CBUlogo3Mpp

Health Careers at Christian Brothers University:
2013-2014

Prepared by Dr. Stan Eisen, Director
Pre-Health Programs
Christian Brothers University

650 East Parkway South
Memphis, TN 38104

321-3447; 321-4433 (FAX)
E-mail:
seisen@cbu.edu
http://www.cbu.edu/~seisen/hc.html

Links to Christian Brothers University:
University Home Page
School of Science Home Page

Updated:  April 8, 2014

Table of Contents

I.Introduction
II.Some Things to Think About
      A.  About your Facebook page
      B.  Numbers of post-high years of schooling

      C.  If it were that easy, everyone would be doing it
      D.  Entering Medical Student Expectations
III.Criminal Background Checks will become routine
IV.Some General Recommendations
V.Medicine

VI.Pharmacy
VII.Dental
VIII.Medical Technology
IX.Physical Therapy
X.Occupational Therapy

XI.Dental Hygiene
XII. Cytotechnology
XIII. Health Information Management
XIV. Nursing
XV.Optometry
XVI. Veterinary Medicine.
XVII. Physician's Assistant
XVIII.  Podiatry
XIX.  Audiology
XX. Sources of Financial aid and Scholarships for clinical training
XXI. Salary Ranges for Biomedical Careers
XXII.Preprofessional Evaluation Request Form
XXIII.  Timeline for submitting Evaluation Request Form
XXIV.When it comes time to write your personal essay, you need to read this

 

I. Introduction

          This booklet is for students who are interested in a career in the health sciences. It includes summaries of the required courses for specific health-related professional schools, the number of hours, and the names of those courses as they are listed in the CBU catalogue. Although the focus is on the various colleges at the University of Tennessee - Memphis, the programs of the College of Veterinary Medicine at UT - Knoxville, the Southern College of Optometry, and the nursing program at the University of Memphis are also covered.

II.Some Things to Think About

 

A.         Your Facebook presence may be damaging to you and to your friends.

This is adapted from an e-mail sent to me by  Barbara Huntington, PHP Director at SDSU:

Hi Students,

This is urgent.  At the conference for admissions officers and preprofessional health advisors in Santa Fe, we spent several sessions talking about the use of Face Book in medical school admissions and many do check.  Please accept these suggestions as serious and urgent.

1.  Don't post anything you wouldn't want your mother, your boss, an admissions officer, or me to see.  (Please don't block me or I won't be able to warn you if something could hurt you.)

2.  Go through all your pictures of anything that might be even slightly inappropriate (folks looking drunk, holding bottles of liquor, in revealing clothes, discussing parts of anatomy, using foul language, etc) and take off all the tags--especially of people applying to health prof. schools.  Even if the picture itself is ok,  take off the tags if it is in a group of pictures that might lead one to believe the person was at an inappropriate place/party.

3.  Then go back and erase any of those kinds of pictures or pix of friends in groups of those pictures.

4.  Take out any comments that look like you are trying to be sneaky, or you wouldn't want the schools you or your friends are applying to to see.

5.  Some of your friends are applying now, so don't wait.

I realize everyone is enjoying all the fun stuff (and you should) at the end of school, but you also don't want to brand CBU as a party school of students who might not show the best judgement in posting on Facebook because YOU ARE FROM CBU AND WILL BE  JUDGED AS A PRODUCT OF THAT SCHOOL  --Best wishes on your finals and have fun (but be discrete).

 

 

 

B.  Question 1:  How many post-high school years of education are you willing to tolerate? +

         Question 2:  Are you people-oriented or thing-oriented?

 

·         How many post-high school years of education are you willing to tolerate?

Are you People- or Thing-Oriented?

·         1-3

·         4-6

·         7-8

·         >8

People-Oriented

·         Licensed Practical nurse

·         Genetic Counselor

·         Physical/ Occupational Therapist

·         Bachelor's of Science Nurse

·         Veterinarian

·         Dentist

·         Nurse practitioner

·         Optometrist

·         Pharmacist

·         Pediatrician

·         Internist

·         Family Medicine

People-oriented more than Thing-Oriented

·         Dental Hygienist

·         Phlebotomist

·         Park ranger

·         Zoo curator

·         Speech pathologist

·         Research scientist

·         Oncologist

Thing-oriented more than people- oriented

·         X-ray technologist

·         Fisheries/ Wildlife Biologist

·         Medical Technologist

·         Geneticist

·         Surgeon

Thing-Oriented

·         DNA technologist

·         Quality control lab tech

·         Medical Office Manager

·         Bio-statistician

·         Radiologist

 

 

C.    If it were that easy (i.e. getting into a clinical health-related graduate program, everyone would be doing it.

It takes planning, over 4 years.  Here’s a useful website of things to consider, from the AAMC (This timeline is equally appropriate for clinical health-related graduate programs other than medicine.)

http://www.cbu.edu/~seisen/AAMC_Timeline.htm

 

D.  Entering Medical Student Expectations

 

 

 

Entering Medical Student Expectations – excerpted from a joint report from Scientific Foundations for Future Physicians, a joint publication of the Association of American Medical Colleges (AAMC) and the Howard Hughes Medical Institute (HHMI) – 2009. 

 

ScientificFoundationsForFuturePhysicians_Page_01

 

 

Notwithstanding the focus of this initiative, the committee believes that the specific guidance and recommendations presented for undergraduate competencies are not limited to the student engaged in premedical education, but are also valuable for the subsequent study of any career in the health or life sciences. 

 

Overarching Competency at the Time of Entry into Medical School:

 

Demonstrate both knowledge of and ability to use basic principles of mathematics and statistics, physics, chemistry, biochemistry, and biology needed for the application of the sciences to human health and disease; demonstrate observational and analytical skills and the ability to apply those skills and principles of biological situations.

 

Competency E1:  Apply quantitative reasoning and appropriate mathematics to describe or explain phenomena in the natural world.

 

Learning Objectives:

 

1.      Demonstrate quantitative numeracy and facility with the language of mathematics;

2.     Interpret data sets and communicate those interpretations using visual and other appropriate tools;

3.     Make statistical inferences from data sets;

4.     Extract relevant information from large data sets;

5.     Make inferences about natural phenomena using mathematical models;

6.     Apply algorithmic approaches and principles of logic (including the distinction between cause/effect and association) to problem solving;

7.     Quantify and interpret changes in dynamical systems.

 

Competency E2:  Demonstrate understanding of the process of scientific inquiry, and explain how scientific knowledge is discovered and validated. 

 

Learning Objectives:

 

1.      Develop observational and interpretive skills through hands-on laboratory or field experiences;

2.     Demonstrate ability to measure with precision, accuracy, and safety;

3.     Be able to operate basic laboratory instrumentation for scientific measurement;

4.      Be able to articulate (in guided inquiry or in project-based research) scientific questions and hypotheses, design experiments, acquire data, perform data analysis, and present results;

5.     Demonstrate the ability to search effectively, to evaluate critically, and to communicate and analyze the scientific literature.

 

Competency E3:  Demonstrate knowledge of basic physical principles and their applications to the understanding of living systems. 

 

Learning Objectives:

 

1.      Demonstrate understanding ob mechanics as applied to human and diagnostic systems;

2.     Demonstrate knowledge of the principles of electricity and magnetism (e.g. charge, current flow, resistance, capacitance, electrical potential, and magnetic fields);

3.     Demonstrate knowledge of wave generation and propagation to the production and transmission of radiation;

4.     Demonstrate knowledge of the principles of thermodynamics and fluid motion;

5.     Demonstrate knowledge of quantum mechanics, such as atomic and molecular energy levels, spin, and ionizing radiation;

6.     Demonstrate knowledge of principles of systems behavior, including input-output relationships and positive and negative feedback

 

Competency E4:  Demonstrate knowledge of basic principles of chemistry and some of their applications to the understanding of living systems.

 

Learning Objectives: 

 

1.      Demonstrate knowledge of atomic structure;

2.     Demonstrate knowledge of molecular structure;

3.     Demonstrate knowledge of molecular interactions;

4.     Demonstrate knowledge of thermodynamic criteria for spontaneity of physical processes and chemical reactions and the relationship of thermodynamics to chemical equilibrium;

5.     Demonstrate knowledge of principles of chemical reactivity to explain chemical kinetics and derive possible reaction mechanisms;

6.     Demonstrate knowledge of the chemistry of carbon-containing compounds relevant to their behavior in an aqueous environment.

 

Competency E5:  Demonstrate knowledge of how biomolecules contribute to the structure and function of cells. 

 

Learning Objectives:

 

1.      Demonstrate knowledge of the structure, biosynthesis, and degradation of biological macromolecules;

2.     Demonstrate knowledge of the principles of chemical thermodynamics and kinetics that drive biological processes in the context of space (i.e. compartmentation) and time:  enzyme-catalyzed reactions and metabolic pathways, regulation, integration, and the chemical logic of sequential reaction steps;

3.     Demonstrate knowledge of the biochemical processes that carry out transfer of biological information from DNA, and how these processes are regulated;

4.     Demonstrate knowledge of the principles of genetics and epigenetics to explain heritable traits in a variety of organisms.

 

Competency E6:  Apply understanding of principles of how molecular and cell assemblies, organs, and organisms develop structure and carry out function. 

 

Learning Objectives: 

 

1.     Employ knowledge of the general components of prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells, such as molecular, microscopic, macroscopic, and three-dimensional structure, to explain how different components contribute to cellular and organismal function;

2.     Demonstrate knowledge of how cell-cell junctions and the extracellular matrix interact to form tissues with specialized function;

3.     Demonstrate knowledge of the mechanisms governing cell division and development of embryos;

4.     Demonstrate knowledge of the principles of biomechanics and explain structural and functional properties of tissues and organisms.

 

Competency E7: Explain how organisms sense and control their internal environment and how they respond to external stress. 

 

Learning Objectives: 

 

1.      Explain maintenance of homeostasis in living organisms by using principles of mass transport, heat transfer, energy balance, and feedback and control systems;

2.     Explain physical and chemical mechanisms used for transduction and information processing in the sensing and integration of internal and environmental signals;

3.     Explain how living organisms use internal and external defense and avoidance mechanisms to protect themselves from threats, spanning the spectrum from behavioral to structural and immunologic responses.

 

Competency E8:  Demonstrate an understanding of how the organizing principle of evolution by natural selection explains the diversity of life on earth. 

 

Learning Objectives: 

 

1.      Explain how genomic variability and mutation contribute to the success of populations;

2.     Explain how evolutionary mechanisms contribute to change in gene frequencies in populations and to reproductive isolation.

 

III.Criminal background checks are now routine

One of the sessions at the NAAHP conference in 2006 was devoted to the issue of criminal background checks.  Robert Sabalis, Associate Vice President of the Section for Student Affairs and Programs  for the Association of American Colleges gave a presentation on that subject, based on an article he wrote which was published in the June 2006 issue of The Advisor.

The AAMC started addressing the issue of criminal background checks for accepted applicants because of a number of factors:

1.     State legislatures’ consideration of statutes that would mandate such checks;

2.     Clinical institutions (hospitals, in particular) which require such checks for medical students completing clinical rotation in their facilities;

3.     Recent reports by local and national media of criminal activities involving enrolled students.

The AAMC Executive Council decided to establish criminal background checks on accepted applicants to accomplish 4 goals:

1.     To bolster the public’s continuing trust in the medical professions;

2.     To enhance the safety and well-being of patients;

3.     To ascertain the ability of accepted applicants and enrolled medical students to eventually become licensed as physicians; and

4.     To minimize the liability of medical schools and their affiliated clinical facilities.

These background checks:

·        Will be iniaited at the time of first acceptance by a medical school, or for a wait-listed applicant, at the request of a medical school admissions officer;

·        Would NOT be a component of the application, interviedw, or selection processes for medical school, but would be a mandatory component of the pre-matriculation process for each accepted applicant;

·        Would provide medical school admissions committees with a complete list of offenses and adjudications;

·        Would allow a medical school to withdraw an acceptance;

·        Would allow for the applicant to file an appeal.

At this point, approximately ¼ of the 125 AAMC-member allopathic medical schools in the United States now require some type of background screening of accepted applicants and/or enrolled students.  Furthermore, other professional schools or professional organizations representing health-related schools will be establishing their own criteria for criminal background checks.

For more information, read Sabalis, R.  (2006).  Criminal Background Checks:  Meeting the Expectations of the Public and the Needs of the Profession.  The Advisor 26(2):5-8. 

IV. Some General Recommendations

          In the July 1996 issue of Issue Focus, a publication of the Association of American Medical Colleges, there was an article regarding the qualities that medical schools are looking for in their candidates. These qualities can be applied to any other health-related profession:

How Do Medical Schools Select Tomorrow’s Doctors?

          Medical school admissions committees face the challenge each year of assembling an entering class of students who will best fulfill the mission of the school and serve the nation’s diverse population. To meet this challenge, the admissions committees select candidates based on a comprehensive review of each applicant’s total academic and personal qualifications. Among the qualifications they examine are an applicant’s:

    • scholarship
    • accomplishments
    • intellectual curiosity
    • emotional maturity
    • character
    • interest in medicine
    • sensitivity to others
    • communication skills
    • critical thinking and problem-solving skills
    • sense of caring for others, and
    • commitment to service

          Admissions committees gather much of this information from the detailed application each medical school applicant completes. These applications include a personal statement from the candidate, his/her academic, extracurricular and volunteer history, letters of recommendation, transcripts and a report of standardized test scores. Admissions committees also may interview applications to explore their qualifications further.

The Biology Department recommends that you send your application to the appropriate school or Application Service as soon as possible. All of the colleges at UT - Memphis, for example, have a "rolling admissions" policy, which means they accept people as they receive applications. Even if you are highly qualified, you may not be considered if the application is sent late. The following is a list of deadlines for the various colleges at UT - Memphis:

College of Allied Health Sciences

  • Clinical Laboratory Sciences: March 1 and September 1
  • Cytotechnology: December 15
  • Dental Hygiene: February 15
  • Health Information Management: March 1
  • Medical Technology: December 1
  • Occupational Therapy: January 15
  • Master's in Physical Therapy (entry level): January 15
  • Physical Therapy M.S. (for people who already have a BS in PT): March 1 & Sept. 1

College of Dentistry: December 31

College of Graduate Health Sciences

  • Interdisciplinary Program: March 1
  • Anatomy and Neurobiology: May 15
  • Biochemistry: March 1
  • Biomedical Engineering: May 15
  • Dental Sciences: May 15
  • Epidemiology: May 15
  • Health Science Administration: March 15
  • Microbiology: May 15
  • Nursing Ph.D.: January 15
  • Pathology: February 1
  • Pharmaceutical Sciences: March 15
  • Physiology & Biophysics: May 15

College of Nursing: January 15

College of Medicine: November 15

College of Medicine Advanced Standing (3rd Year Transfer): April 1

College of Pharmacy: February 1

     If the application service allows for your references to send letters of recommendation directly, please choose that option.  Otherwise, please fill out an Evaluation Request Form to the Director of Preprofessional Health Programs as soon as possible, in order to ensure a prompt response should you receive a request for supplementary information.  Please use the CBU preprofessional evaluation request form, which is attached at the end of this booklet.

A growing number of professional schools are subscribing to application services, which serve as a central distribution office. The applicant fills out a primary form, specifies the schools to which (s)he wants the application to go, and submits it to the central office. Copies of your file are then sent to the respective schools.

The following quote, which appeared in the October 1996 (Vol. 4, No. 1) issue of the AAMC Newsletter for Prehealth Advisors, pertains to the purpose of the secondary application, which some schools send out following receipt of the initial report from AMCAS:

"Considerable variability exists with regard to the purpose of the secondary application. At some schools, there is a desire for additional information not included on the AMCAS application. Some of the desired information may relate specifically to the individual medical school. At other schools, particularly schools with very large applicant pools, the secondary application helps to identify those who are interested enough in the school to take the time to complete the responses to special questions. At still other schools, there is an initial cut in the application pool made based on criteria set by the school and secondary applications are sent only to individuals who pass this cut. Finally, some state schools use information from the secondary application to determine whether the applicant qualifies as a resident of the state."

V.  Medicine:

 

There is now a unified pathway to medical practice in the United States:

 

 

The MCAT is undergoing changes which will be implemented starting in 2015. 

 

The Commercial Appeal ran an article, Medical college entrance test to be updated:  MCAT to include 4 parts, nix writing sample, (http://www.commercialappeal.com/news/2011/may/16/medical-college-test-to-be-updated/ ) which describes these changes:

The new proposed exam would include four sections: one on biology, one on chemistry, one on "behavioral and social sciences principles," and a fourth on "critical analysis and reasoning skills" -- especially on the topics of "ethics and philosophy" and "cross-cultural studies."  The writing sample will be dropped from the exam. 

The incentive for these changes is an increasing awareness of the importance that nontraditional fields in medicine.  The article cites the example of published studies which link childhood trauma with adult-onset illness, or poverty and disease.

As a result, the sentiment among the AAMC’s review committee members is that physicians will need to be more broadly prepared. 

The committee also recommends ‘that the test "provide low-cost preparation materials" and "discounts or waivers on testing fees" for needy students (Coleman spent at least $200 on preparatory material, plus a $235 testing fee and another $60 fee to move her exam date from May to June). The test, which is already 51/2 hours long, will also be 90 minutes longer and nix the writing sample.’ 

For more information, go to http://www.aamc.org/students/mcat/mcatschedule.htm

 

One physician’s answer to the age-old question, “Hey, I’m premed, why must I take organic chemistry?

From the HLTHPROF listserv, a reply from a retired cardiothoracic surgeon:

I would like to respond to your analysis of the usefulness of organic chemistry as a milestone in the selection process for medical school. I am a retired cardiothoracic surgeon with over twenty-five years of clinical practice. Although, on a day to day basis I clearly did not use organic chemistry per se, I did have to continue to teach and learn throughout my career. What organic chemistry demonstrates, insofar as undergraduates [are concerned], is the capacity to absorb huge amounts of information in the context of a rigorous concomitant course load. When the student matriculates at medical school, they take the equivalent of 30 to 35 credits per semester and are expected to be able to conduct excellent time management and learn all of this material. As a practicing physician, you may not use every piece of data that you had to learn in medical school, but you do need to have the capacity to apply knowledge, and continue to learn (and teach) throughout your career.

Medical schools recognize that organic chemistry helps to demonstrate these abilities as prospective applicants.  

 

My take on it?  It builds character.   

http://sphotos.ak.fbcdn.net/hphotos-ak-snc3/hs540.snc3/30604_124085020944862_107134639306567_201408_7897137_n.jpg




 

A.  Allopathic Medicine

          Most allopathic medical schools, including UT - Memphis, subscribe to AMCAS (American Medical College Application Service.)  Osteopathic schools of medicine use a similar application service, AACOMAS (American Association of Colleges of Osteopathic Medicine Application Service.) The application forms for the AMCAS are presently available on disk and via the web.  The disk version will be phased out by 2002 and replaced with a web-based application.

 

Number Crunching 101:  What It Takes To Get Into Selected Allopathic  Schools

 

State

School

Mean GPA

Mean VR

Mean

Writing Sample

Mean Physical Sciences

Mean Biological Sciences

Arkansas

UAMS

3.63

9.0

NA

9.0

9.0

Georgia

Emory

3.75

10.1

P

10.8

10.8

Louisiana

Tulane

3.5

10

NA

10

10

Mass.

Harvard

3.8

10.5

NA

11.7

11.8

Mississippi

U of Miss

3.65

NA

NA

NA

NA

Missouri

St.Louis U

3.68

9.4

Q

9.9

10.2

 

Wash. U

3.8

11.0

NA

12.3

12.5

Tennessee

ETSU for Fall 2013 entering class

3.64

9.5

O

9.0

9.8

 

UT Health Science Center- Mem

3.55

9

O

9

10

 

Vanderbilt

3.73

11.2

NA

11.2

11.2

 

The following table shows the number of people who applied to allopathic medical schools using the AMCAS service, the changes per year, the number of matriculants entering medical school, and the ratio of matriculants to applicants from 1992 to 2001.

Application Year

Number applying

Change since previous year (%)

Number matriculants

Change since previous year (%)

 

Ratio Matriculants/ Applicants (%)

1992

      37,402

-----------

      16,289

-------

43.6

1993

      42,806

14.45

      16,307

0.11

38.1

1994

      45,360

5.97

      16,287

-0.12

35.9

1995

      46,586

2.70

      16,253

-0.21

34.9

1996

      46,965

0.81

      16,201

-0.32

34.5

1997

      43,016

-8.41

      16,165

-0.22

37.6

1998

      40,996

-4.70

      16,170

0.03

39.4

1999

      38,443

-6.23

      16,221

0.32

42.2

2000

      37,008

-3.73

      16,301

0.49

44.0

2001

      34,860

-5.80

      16,365

0.39

46.9

2002

      33,625

-3.54

      16,488

0.75

49.0

2003

      34,791

3.47

      16,541

0.32

47.5

2004

      35,735

2.71

      16,648

0.65

46.6

2005

      37,372

4.58

      17,003

2.13

45.5

2006

      39,108

4.65

      17,361

2.11

44.4

2007

      42,315

8.20

      17,753

2.26

42.0

2008

      42,231

-0.20

      18,036

1.59

42.7

2009

      42,269

0.09

      18,390

1.96

43.5

 

 

College of Medicine (UT - Memphis):

What They Want

# of Hours

What We Call It @ CBU

Biology w/Lab

8

BIOL 111 Lec & Lab

BIOL 112 Lec & Lab

General Chemistry

8

CHEM 113 Lec & Lab

CHEM 114 Lec & Lab

Organic Chemistry

8

CHEM 211 Lec & Lab

CHEM 212 Lec & Lab

Physics

8

PHYS 201 Lec & Lab

PHYS 202 Lec & Lab

English/Literature*

6

ENG 111

ENG 112

Electives

52

Free to choose

*” Facility in the use of both oral and written English is considered highly essential to the successful study of medicine. Introductory freshman English (six semester hours) will meet the admission requirement. Students who qualify for advanced placement credit in English will not be required to take additional English courses, although such students are encouraged to do so.”

 

Some courses that may be worth taking in the relatively sheltered undergraduate environment: 

 

Biology

·        Vertebrate Embryology (BIOL 211)

·        Medical and Scientific Terminology (BIOL 213)

·        Genetics (BIOL 311)

·        Microbiology (BIOL 321)

·        Animal Histology (BIOL 414)

·        Immunology (BIOL 415)

·        Cell/Molecular Biology (BIOL 421)

 

Chemistry

·        Biochemistry (CHEM 315 & 316)

 

Other

·        Economics of Health and Healthcare (ECON 323)

·        Literature (virtually any upper-level English course)

·        Personal Finance (FIN 346)

·        Foreign language (especially Spanish)

·        Medical Ethics (PHIL 322)

 

 

 

 

          Admissions to all professional schools is extremely competitive.  For example, the following data pertains to the College of Medicine at UT - Memphis and the James Quillen School of Medicine at East Tennessee State University:

 

 

University of Tennessee Health Science Center

East Tennessee State University

University of Arkansas College of Medicine

Application cycle

# of Applicants

# of Available spaces

# of Applicants

# of Available Spaces

# of Applicants

# of Available spaces

1993-1994

896

165

1898

60

 

 

1994-1995

2320

165 (1st year of AMCAS)

2232

 

 

60

 

 

1995-1996

2337

165

2090

60

890

150

1996-1997

1959

165

1826

60

906

150

1997-1998

1767

165

1570

60

757

150

1998-1999

1700

165

1574

60

664

150

1999-2000

1637

165

1464

60

560

150

2000-2001

1529

150

1131

60

673

150

2001-2002

1600

150

1144

60

755

150

2002-2003

1354

150

1033

60

675

150

2003-2004

1268

150

995

60

693

150

2004-2005

1051

150

1187

60

694

150

2005-2006

1268

150

1225

60

949

160

2006-2007

1477

150

1449

60

1249

160

2007-2008

n.a.

n.a.

1641

60

1542

160

2008-2009

1353

165

1445

66

1714

174

2009-2010

1345

165

1586

60

2119

174

2010-2011

1302

165

1658

60

2163

174

2011-2012

1630

165

1929

72

 

 

2012-2013

1628

165

1995

72

 

 

 

 

          The College of Medicine at the University of Tennessee - Memphis is a well-respected institution.  In 1999, U.S. News & World Report ranked UT 15th among the nation’s comprehensive medical schools.  The UT - Campbell Clinic Department of Orthopaedic Surgery was ranked 10th in the national among orthopedic surgery departments.  The department is one of two in the South ranked in the top 10.  Furthermore, few medical schools can match UT’s richness of opportunities for clinical experience.  UT is affiliated with a number of teaching hospitals, including Baptist Memorial, Methodist Hospital, the Regional Medical Center and UT Bowld Hospital.  Students and residents also receive experience in five other area hospitals, five clinics and two surgical centers.  

 

          As you can see, Admissions Departments will have no difficulty in filling the available spaces with qualified students.  The challenge to you is to present yourself as well as possible:

          1) Try to find work, either as a paid employee or as a volunteer, in a clinic, practice, or hospital in your field of interest.  That way, you can demonstrate to the Admissions Committee members that you know what you're getting yourself into, and you want it;

          2) Visit the schools.  This is not difficult if you're interested in a program at UT - Memphis, but what about the Quillen School of Medicine at East Tennessee State University?  My opinion is that you will make a favorable impression on them if you make the effort in driving the 500+ miles to see the campus.  (Doug Taylor, Assistant Dean of Admissions, has mentioned that if you drove north the same distance that you would have to drive east to reach ETSU, you'd get to Canada first);

          3) Submit your application as soon as possible, as discussed above;

          4) Do some kind of preparation for the aptitude test.  This may mean enrolling in a Kaplan study course, or working through a book on your own.  You may not learn any more than you already know, but it helps to organize your thoughts and to take exams;

          5) Create for yourself a more professional-sounding e-mail address.  Here's what Adam Pack, PHP Director at Utica College in New York had to say on the subject: "People who certainly CAN benefit from a two address system are the students with email addresses like (none of these are made up - the information after the '@' is deleted to protect their anonymity) "village_idiot", "SweetSexxxtoy", "XXXgurl", and others. At my gentle suggestion, they now have a second, more professional-sounding address with which to correspond with grad schools and my committee..."

How important is it to be prompt in the submission of your AMCAS application and evaluation request form?  Here's a timeline for applicants applying to medical school from the Admissions Office of the University of Tennessee Health Science Center:

What you should be doing

When you should finish doing it

AMCAS Application

  • Electronic Application only - apply through AMCAS ®

5 June 2007

AMCAS Application Deadline

15 November 2007

Processing of AMCAS Application Materials

  • Applicants are screened
  • Supplemental applications are mailed to competitive candidates and NOT to everyone who submits an AMCAS application

June 2007 through January 2008

Notification of Interviews

  • Applicants granted an interview are notified in writing
  • Interviews are conducted on Mondays, Tuesdays and Wednesdays.

September 2007 through February 2008

Pre-professional Evaluation Deadline

  • Submit one pre-medical advisory committee evaluation (where such a committee exists) or three letters from individual faculty members

1 March 2008, depending on when you receive a secondary application

Admissions Committee Decision

  • Meetings are held on Friday afternoons
  • Decisions are mailed on a rolling basis

October 2007 through March 2008

Deadline to Receive Notification of Admissions Committee Decisions

1.     Final decisions completed and remaining applicants notified in writing

1 April 2008

Applicants Who are Not Offered Admission

  • Unsuccessful applicants can meet with the Assistant Dean for Admissions and Student Affairs to discuss reapplication
  • Reapplicants must apply through AMCAS for admission

April 2008 through August 2008

College of Medicine Scholarship Selection

February 2008 through March 2008

Financial Aid Priority Deadline

  • Submit Free Application for Student Aid (FAFSA)

End of February 2008

Deadline to Withdraw Acceptance

  • Official notification must be in writing to request refund of $100 deposit

15 May 2008

Final Official Transcript Deadline

  • Responsibility of accepted applicants to contact the Registrar of each College/University attended to forward official transcripts of course work to the Office of Enrollment Services
  • All transcripts must include verification of degree, if a degree has been awarded.

31 July 2008

 

 

Some Useful Sources of Information regarding Allopathic Medical Schools:

 

Association of American Medical Colleges

<http://www.aamc.org/>

 

Schools in the Mid-South (Address Inquiries To):

Arkansas

Office of Student Admissions

University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences

College of Medicine                                                        

4301 West Markham Street, Slot 551                          

Little Rock, Arkansas  72205-7199                    

(501)   686-5354; 686-5873 (FAX)

E-Mail:  SouthTomG@uams.edu

Web site:  http://www.uams.edu

Contact people:

Tom South, Assistant Dean, Medical Student Admissions and Financial Aid
Linda DuPuy, Director of Medical Student Admissions and Recruitment

 

Mississippi

Chairman, Admissions Committee

University of Mississippi

School of Medicine                                                         

2500 North State Street                                                

Jackson, Mississippi  39216-4505                            

(601)   984-5010;  984-5008  (FAX)                    

http://www.usmsed.edu

Contact person:  Dr. Steven T. Case, Chairman, Admissions Committee

 

Tennessee

Assistant Dean for Admissions and Records

East Tennessee State University                                

James H. Quillen College of Medicine                 

P.O. Box 70580                                                               

Johnson City, TN  37614-0580                                             

(423) 929-6221;  929-6616 (FAX)

E-mail:  sacom@etsu.edu

http://qcom.etsu.edu

Contact person:  Edwin Taylor, Assistant Dean for Admissions & Records

 

Director, Admissions and Records

Meharry Medical College                                              

1005 D.B. Todd Boulevard                                         

Nashville, TN  37208                                                     

(615) 327-6223;  327-6228  (FAX)

http://www.mmc.edu

Contact person:  Allen D. Mosley, Director, Admissions and Records

 

University of Tennessee - Memphis

College of Medicine                                                        

790 Madison Avenue                                                     

Memphis, TN  38163-2166                                         

 (901) 448-5559; 448-7255 (FAX)                      

http://www.utmem.edu/medicine

Contact person:  Nelson Strother, Assistant Dean for Admissions and Student Affairs

                  

Office of Admissions

209 Light Hall

Vanderbilt University                                                    

School of Medicine                                                         

Nashville, TN  37232-0685                                         

(615) 322-2145;   343-8397 (FAX)                     

E-Mail:  medsch.admis@mcmail.vanderbilt.edu

Web Site:  http://www.mc.vanderbilt.edu/medschool

Contact person:  Dr. John Lukens, Chairman, Committee for Admissions

 

Other relatively nearby medical schools:

Missouri

Washington University School of Medicine

Office of Admissions                                           

Campus Box 8077                                                        

660 South Euclid Avenue

St. Louis, MO  63110-1093

(314)   362-6844    FAX:  (314) 362-4658

E-Mail:  wumscoa@msnotes.wustl.edu

Web Site:  http://medschool.wustl.edu/admissions/

Contact person:  Dr. W. Edwin Dodson, Assoc. Dean

 

B.   Osteopathic Medicine

 

The following comparison between osteopathic and allopathic medicine appears in "Mind/Body/Spirit", a brochure distributed by the Kirksville (MO) College of Osteopathic Medicine:

 

"Osteopathic physicians (D.O.s and allopathic physicians (M.D.s) are the only two types of complete physicians.  They are both fully trained and licensed to prescribe medication and perform surgery.

 

The similarities include the following:

·        Applicants to both D.O. and M.D. colleges have a four-year undergraduate degree with an emphasis on science courses.

·        Both D.O.s and M.D.s complete four years of basic medical education.

·        After medical school, both D.O.s and M.D.s can choose to practice any area of medicine after completing an internship and residency program.

·        Both D.O.s and M.D.s must pass national and state licensing examinations.

·        D.O.'s and M.D.s practice together in accredited hospitals and centers.

·         D.O.s and M.D.s both take educational courses annually.

·         Most osteopathic and allopathic medical schools use the MCAT as part of their admissions criteria.

 

The differences include the following:

·        Osteopathic medical schools graduate more students who become primary care physicians.

·        D.O.s practice a "whole person" approach to medicine.  Instead of just treating specific symptoms or illnesses, they regard the body as an integrated whole.

·        Osteopathic physicians focus on preventive health care.

·        D.O.s receive more training in the musculoskeletal system- the body's interconnected system of nerves, muscles, and bones.  This training provides osteopathic physicians with a better understanding of the ways that an injury or illness in one part of the body can affect another.

·        Osteopathic manipulative treatment (OMT) is incorporated in the training and practice of osteopathic physicians.  With OMT, osteopathic physicians can also use their hands to diagnose injury and illness and encourage the body's natural tendency toward good health.  By combining all other medical procedures with OMT, D.O.s offer their patients the most comprehensive care available in medicine today."

 

From An Introduction to Osteopathic Medical Education, a brochure distributed by the American Association of Colleges of Osteopathic Medicine:

 

Osteopathic medicine is a distinctive form of medical care founded on the philosophy that all body systems are interrelated and dependent upon one another for good health. This philosophy was developed in 1874 by Dr. Andrew Taylor Still, who helped pioneer the concept of "wellness" and recognized the importance of treating illness within the context of the whole body. Based on this philosophy, Dr. Still opened the first osteopathic medical college in Kirksville, Missouri in 1892. 

 

Doctors of Osteopathic Medicine (D.O.s) provide comprehensive medical care to patients in all 50 states and the District of Columbia, and must pass a national and/or state medical board examination in order to obtain a license to practice osteopathic medicine.

 

Osteopathic physicians use all of the tools available to modern medicine including prescription medicine and surgery.  They also incorporate a hands-on system of diagnosis and treatment known as osteopathic manipulative medicine into patient care as appropriate.  These techniques are used to relieve pain, restore range of motion and enhance the body's natural capacity to heal.

 

Currently, there are approximately 52,000 D.O.s practicing in the United States.  Reflecting the osteopathic philosophy of treating the whole person, 65% of all D.O.s serve in the primary care areas of family medicine, general internal medicine and general pediatrics, often establishing their practices in medically underserved areas.

 

Today, there are 25 colleges of osteopathic medicine that train future physicians to provide holistic, full-spectrum health care.

 

For information on applying to the colleges of osteopathic medicine, please visit the association's web site at www.aacom.org .

 

"To find health should be the object of the doctor, anyone can find disease."  -- Andrew Taylor Still, founder of osteopathic medicine.

 

 

Factoids About Selected Osteopathic Medical Schools:  2010-2011 Enrollment

 

Name of Institution

AACOMAS Applications received

First-Year Enrollment

Total Enrollment

A.T. Still University – Kirksville College of Osteopathic Medicine  Kirksville, MO

 

 

3,478

 

 

177

 

 

701

University of Health Sciences - Kansas City, MO

 

 

3,052

 

 

244

 

 

985

West Virginia School of Osteopathic Medicine, Lewisburg

 

 

3,384

 

 

219

 

 

811

Pikeville College of Osteopathic Medicine, Pikeville, KY

 

 

2,513

 

 

83

 

 

304

DeBusk College of Osteopathic Medicine, Harrogate, TN

2,616

168

620

 

 

Courses Required by the Selected Osteopathic Schools Mentioned Above

 

Kirksville - Kirksville, MO

University of Health Sciences - Kansas City, MO

West Virginia - Lewisburg

Pikeville - Pikeville, KY

DeBusk College of Osteopathic Medicine

 

# of Required Hours

English Comp

6

6

6

6

8

8

6

General Chem

8

8

8

8

8

Organic Chem

8

8*

8

8

8

Physics

8

8*

8

8

8

Biological Sci

8

12

8

12

8

Minimum # of hours

90

90

90

90

Not specified

Biochemistry

 

3

 

 

 

Genetics

 

3

 

 

 

Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation (CPR) prior to matriculation

 

 

 

ü

 

 

 

*A total of 16 hours in chemistry are required, of which 3 must be biochemistry.

 

 

Grade point Averages and Average (Mean) Medical College Admission Test (MCAT) Scores (Quantitative sections) for Entering Students

 

 

Year

 

2008

2009

2010

GPA

 

 

 

·        Science

3.39

3.35

3.36

·        Non-science

3.58

3.58

3.57

·        Overall Mean

3.48

3.48

3.47

MCAT

 

 

 

·        Biological Science

9.13

9.22

9.29

·        Physical Science

8.40

8.38

8.51

·        Verbal Reasoning

8.59

8.59

8.69

 

 

 

Contact people for regional Osteopathic Schools:

 

DeBusk College of Osteopathic Medicine

Office of Admissions

LMU-DCOM

Attn: Admissions

6965 Cumberland Gap Parkway

Harrogate, TN 37752

phone: 1.800.325.0900 ext. 7090
Internet:  http://www.lmunet.edu/DCOM/index.htm

email: dcomadmissions@lmunet.edu
fax: 423.869.7172

 

Kirksville College of Osteopathic Medicine

800 W. Jefferson St.   

Kirksville,   MO    63501   

Phone:   866.626.2878

Internet:  http://www.atsu.edu/kcom/

 

Pikeville College of Osteopathic Medicine
147 Sycamore Street
Pikeville, Kentucky 41501

(606) 218-5250
1-866-BEARS-00
www.pc.edu 

 

West Virginia School of Osteopathic Medicine

400 North Lee Street

Lewisburg, WV  24901

Telephone:  1-800-356-7836

Internet:  http://www.wvsom.edu/west_virginia_school_of_osteopathic_medicine.aspx

 

William Carey University College of Osteopathic Medicine

Box 207
498 Tuscan Avenue
Hattiesburg, MS 39401

Telephone:  1-601-318-6235

Internet:  http://www.wmcarey.edu/COM/Home/1722/CollegeofOsteopathic.shtm

 

American Association of Colleges of Osteopathic Medicine

5550 Friendship Blvd., Suite 310

Chevy Chase, MD  20815-7231

Phone:  (301) 968-4148

FAX:  (301) 968-4191

Internet:  http://www.aacom.org

c. Holistic Medicine

Statement from the American Board of Holistic Medicine: May 28, 2002:

The American Board of Holistic Medicine (ABHM) offers its fourth certification examination November 21, 2002, in Denver, Colorado.

For treating acute medical problems and trauma, conventional medicine in the United States has evolved a very efficient plan, unsurpassed by any of the world's current medical systems. However, about 85 percent of our health-care dollars are spent in the management of chronic and degenerative disease. The conventional approach to chronic illness has utilized techniques that attempt to intervene in the degenerative process, emphasizing drugs and surgery. The importance of lifestyle and the mental, emotional, social and environmental aspects of human experience have attracted only minimal attention in medical practice. Energy medicine and spiritual experience and their relationship to healing have received even less emphasis.

Studies during the last ten years have repeatedly confirmed the intense interest of consumers in the areas encompassed by holistic medicine. Governmental agencies, legislatures, medical educators and insurance carriers are attempting to respond to the changes precipitated by this interest.

Holistic Medicine is the emerging medical specialty that incorporates the art and science of (1) caring for the whole person – body, mind, and spirit – to treat and prevent disease; and, (2) empowering patients to create a condition of optimal health far beyond merely the absence of illness. Both outside and inside the medical profession, this concept of medicine of the whole person is gathering increasing support. The body-mind-spirit approach integrates many disciplines and modalities, including physiology, biochemistry, nutrition, exercise, environment, emotions, attitudes, beliefs, social relationships, manual medicine, herbs, homeopathy, energy medicine, acupuncture, meditation, prayer, and biofeedback.

Holistic medicine is based on the core belief that unconditional love is life's most powerful healer. At its essence, the practice of holistic medicine embraces a spirit of interdisciplinary and physician-patient cooperation; balances the mitigation of causes with relief of symptoms; integrates conventional and complementary therapies; and facilitates the experience of being fully alive.

As these concepts were incorporated into American medical practice, medical education, health planning, and research, reasonable standards needed to be established regarding the application of the body of knowledge which encompasses the field of Holistic Medicine. The A.B.H.M. is not presently an affiliate of the American Board of Medical Specialties. Once criteria are met, it is the intent of the Board of Directors to apply for that affiliation.

The ABHM was founded in 1996 for the purposes of

  • Evaluating the candidacy of applicants desiring certification as specialists in Holistic Medicine.
  • Establishing and maintaining a recognized standard of excellence in the specialty of Holistic Medicine.
  • Improving the quality of medical care provided to the public.

Its founders envisioned a paradigm shift in the development of the practice of medicine in the United States. Certification will help meet the public demand and professional interest in the inclusion of "alternative" medical practices in the integrated delivery of the best medical care. The offering of the Board's first certifying examination in December of 2000 marked a milestone in the realization of the vision of the founders of the ABHM.

Nearly 400 diplomates of the ABHM benefit from knowing that they have met a peer-reviewed standard. In today's concern for excellence and accountability in medical care, qualification by virtue of having met this standard will have implications for medical training and practice, as well as the legal and reimbursement systems. As a result of achievement of board certified status, Diplomates in Holistic Medicine will know that:

  • they have met the only comprehensive peer-reviewed test standard for M.D.s and D.O.s regarding knowledge in Complementary, Integrative and Holistic Medicine.
  • their patients will benefit from the enhancement of their holistic skills as the result of attendance at the review course and preparation for the certifying examination.
  • their location as board-certified holistic physicians will appear on the ABHM website which is available for inquiries by patients seeking holistic resources.
  • they have contributed to the advancement of the cause of holistic medicine as part of the growing number of certified physicians.
  • In licensure, medical disciplinary and medicolegal issues, they will be recognized as members of a group with peer-reviewed, acknowledged standards with an identified database and scientific basis.

 

D. Naturopathic Medicine: From a flyer distributed by the American Association of Naturopathic Medical Colleges:

The American Association of Naturopathic Medical Colleges (AANMC) was established in February 2001 to propel and foster the naturopathic medical profession by actively supporting the academic efforts of accredited and recognized schools of naturopathic medicine.

All U.S. AANMC member institutions have been accredited or are in candidate status for accreditation by one of the regional accrediting agencies approved by the U.S. Department of Education. In addition, all of the naturopathic medicine programs of the member schools have been accredited (or are candidates for accreditation) by the Council on Naturopathic Medical Education (CNME), the recognized accreditor for naturopathic medical programs in North America.

Students graduating from the naturopathic programs of AANMC member schools are eligible to sit for the naturopathic physicians licensing examinations (NPLEX). Passing the NPLEX is required before a doctor of naturopathic medicine can be licensed by a state or provincial jurisdiction as a primary care general practice physician.

The following US States and Canadian Provinces currently license naturopathic physicians:

Alaska

Montana

Puerto Rico

Arizona

New Hampshire

British Columbia

California

Oregon

Manitoba

Connecticut

Utah

Ontario

Hawaii

Vermont

Saskatchewan

Kansas

Washington

 

Maine

Washington, D.C.

 

The AANMC member schools are four-year professional level medical programs that result in a Naturopathic Medicine Degree (ND) for those with the belief in the healing power of nature and the importance of body, mind and spirit. Students are educated in the latest advances in science in combination with natural approaches to therapy, disease prevention, and clinical education. A naturopathic physician is educated in all of the same basic sciences as an M.D. but also studies holistic and nontoxic approaches to therapy with a strong emphasis on disease prevention and optimizing wellness. In addition to a standard medical curriculum, the naturopathic physician is required to complete four years of training in clinical nutrition, acupuncture, homeopathic medicine, botanical medicine, psychology, and counseling (to encourage people to make lifestyle changes in support of their personal health). A naturopathic physician takes rigorous professional board exams so that he or she may be licensed by a state or jurisdiction as a primary care general practice physician.

The schools which offer N.D. degrees include the following:

 Bastyr University
Kenmore, Washington 98028-4966
www.bastyr.edu

The Canadian College of Naturopathic Medicine
Toronto, Canada M2K 1E2
www.ccnm.edu

National College of Naturopathic Medicine
Portlant, OR 97201
www.ncnm.edu

Southwest College of Naturopathic Medicine and Health Sciences
Tempe, AZ 85282
www.scnm.edu

University of Bridgeport College of Naturopathic Medicine
Bridgeport, CT
www.bridgeport.edu/naturopathy

For admission into most naturopathic medicine programs, students must have completed three years of premedical training and earned a bachelor of science degree. While no specific major is required for admission, students are expected to have completed courses in English and humanities, as well as math, physics and psychology, with a strong emphasis on chemistry and biology. Courses that will help prepare students for the naturopathic course of study include anatomy, physiology, biochemistry, botany and developmental psychology. In addition to prerequisite course work, prospective students must demonstrate appropriate observational and communication skills, motor function, intellectual-conceptual abilities, integrative and quantitative abilities, and behavioral and social maturity.

 

E. Chiropractic

The following is a listing of prerequisites for Northwestern College of Chiropractic, located in Minneapolis, MN. These courses can be taken at any regionally accredited undergraduate college or university, and be at the preprofessional level. Survey courses are not accepted. The courses listed are subject areas and not necessarily exact course titles. Lastly, the six hours listed for each of the sciences are a credit hour minimum.

What They Want

# of Hours

What We Call It @ CBU

Biology (Animal or Vertebrate Biology with labs)

6

BIOL 111 Lec & Lab
BIOL 112 Lec & Lab

General Chemistry

6

CHEM 113 Lec & Lab
CHEM 114 Lec & Lab

Organic Chemistry

6

CHEM 211 Lec & Lab
CHEM 212 Lec & Lab

Physics

6

PHYS 201 Lec & Lab
PHYS 202 Lec & Lab

English, Communications

6

ENG 111 & ENG 112

Psychology

3

PSYC 105

Humanities or Social Sciences

15

HUM(anities)
POLS (Political Science)
HIS(tory)
Social Science

Electives

42

Free to choose


VI. Pharmacy

"One of the main tools of physicians treating patients is medication, but though doctors prescribe pharmaceuticals, the professionals who actually dispense the medication are pharmacists…Pharmacists advise health professionals and the public on the proper selection and use of medicines. The special knowledge of the pharmacist is needed because of the complexity and potential side effects of the large and growing number of pharmaceutical products on the market…." From Stanfield, Peggy S. 1995. Introduction to the Health Professions, second edition. Jones and Bartlett, Publishers.

Most pharmacy schools subscribe to PharmCAS, the Pharmacy College Application Service. 

PharmCAS provides the following:

  • One application to multiple pharmacy schools and colleges broadens your "reach" as you are considered by several institutions at once.
  • One application eliminates duplicate information and transcripts
  • One application saves you time
  • One application = one point of contact

For more information, visit http://www.PharmCAS.org .

College of Pharmacy (UT - Memphis):

What They Want

# Hours

What We Call It

General Biology/Zoology

8

BIOL 111 Lec & Lab
BIOL 112 Lec & Lab

General Chemistry

8

CHEM 113 Lec & Lab
CHEM 114 Lec & Lab

Organic Chemistry

8

CHEM 211 Lec & Lab
CHEM 212 Lec & Lab

English Composition

6

ENG 111
ENG 112

Anatomy and Physiology (as of the entering class of 2005)

8

BIOL 217 Lec & Lab
BIOL 218 Lec & Lab

Biochemistry

8

Recommended: CHEM 315 & 316 Lec & Lab; Permitted: CHEM 312 & 438 Lec & Lab

Microbiology

4

BIOL 321 Lec & Lab

Speech

3

SPCH 125

Statistics

3

BUS 221 or MATH 201 or PSYC 356

Fundamentals of Calculus

3

MATH 106 or MATH 131

Social Sciences electives

6

Any of the following:

  • PSYC(ology)
  • SOC(iology)
  • ECON(onomics)
  • POLS (Political Science)

Humanities Electives

6

Any of the following:

  • HUM(anities)
  • HIS(tory)
  • PHIL(osophy)
  • Foreign languages

General Electives

 12*

Free to choose

The following courses are recommended, but not required:

·        Immunology (BIOL 415 Lecture and Lab)

·        Physics (PHYS 201 & 202, Lecture and Lab for each)

 *May include the following:

  • Mathematics if it is a prerequisite for physics;
  • Any other institution requirements will also count in this category.

"The shortage of pharmacists nationwide has dramatically increased the applicant pool for the 2001-2002 application cycle to more than 400 applicants. The College will increase the class size from 100 to 125 students starting in Fall 2002 to address this shortage. This year's entering class averaged 110 hours of prerequisites, with 75% possessing a degree. The average GPA was 3.4 and the average PCAT was 220 (80th percentile). " (From a memo dated May 13, 2002, sent by Dr. James C. Eoff, III., Pharm. D., Executive Associate Dean of the University of Tennessee Health Science Center College of Pharmacy.)

Regarding the Pharmacy College Admission Test (PCAT's):

 

PCAT Computer-Based Testing

The PCAT is now a computer-based test (CBT) version of the PCAT.

Below are the Pharmacy College Admissions Test (PCAT) examination dates

and registration fees for the 2011-2012 cycle: 

 

July 20, 27, 2011
September 14, 19, 21, 26, 28, 2011
January 10, 11, 2012

 

 

Some Useful Sources of Information

Pharmacy College Application Service
http://www.PharmCAS.org

The "Pharmacy School Admissions Requirements" (PSAR) guidebook is for free on the AACP web site at <http://www.aacp.org/Students/psar.html>
http://www.aacp.org/Students/psar.html.

Students and advisors may also purchase a printed copy of the PSAR from the

AACP Publications Department ($25 plus $3 for shipping and handling):
- 703/739-2330, #1034;
http://www.aacp.org/Resources/resources.html
<
http://www.aacp.org/Resources/resources.html>

Dr. Carl Trinca, Executive Director
American Association of Colleges of Pharmacy
1426 Prince Street
Alexandria, VA 22314

Telephone: 703-739-2330
FAX: 703-836-8982
Web Site:
http://xerxes.nas.edu:70/1/cwse/AACP.html

For a list of accredited colleges of pharmacy, contact

American Council on Pharmaceutical Education
311 West Superior Street
Chicago, IL 60610

Schools in the Mid-South (Direct inquiries to):

Mississippi

The University of Mississippi
Dr. Marvin C. Wilson, Associate Dean for Academic Affairs
School of Pharmacy
University, MS 38677-9814
(601) 232-7996
pmarvin@olemiss.edu

Tennessee

The University of Tennessee Health Science Center.
Dr. James Eoff, Pharm.D.
The University of Tennessee - Memphis
800 Madison Avenue
Memphis, TN 38163

(901) 448-6120
E-mail:
Jeoff@utmem.edu
http://pharmacy.utmem.edu/

Enrollment statistics for UTHSC

 

http://pharmacy.utmem.edu/

(Enrollment is now 100 students per class.  Because of demand, they will try to increase it to 120.  They received 290 applications for the entering class of Fall 2000.  Minimum composite PCAT that they will consider is 190, with no section < 180.)

Applicant Pool for the entering class of Fall 2000:

Total Applicants:  290 (up approximately 30% over last year's pool)

Non-Resident:  70

Tennesseeans 200

 

Class of 2000 Admissions Statistics:

Total accepted:  100

% Females:  65%

% Minorities:  16%

% Non-residents:  20%

Prior BS Degree:  55%

 

Average Cumulative GPA = 3.35

Average Cumulative PCAT = 218 (77th percentile)

Average Hours completed = 100 semester hours

Average Age = 22.5

Pharmacy Work Experience = 70%

(Pharmacy Work experience is not required, but career path exploration IS important.

 

Enrollment statistics for Lipscomb University

 

 

Class of 2012

Class of 2013

Class of 2014

Combined Total

Pharmcas 2009 Comparison data*

Average GPA

 

3.21

 

3.34

 

3.29

 

3.28

 

3.41

Average PCAT

 

68%

 

68%

 

66%

 

67%

 

55%

Average Hours

 

133

 

127

 

137

 

132

 

N/A

Degree Holders

 

55%

 

49%

 

60%

 

55%

 

N/A

Class Size

 

74

 

75

 

77

 

226

 

N/A

Male

27%

48%

47%

40%

38%

Female

73%

52%

53%

60%

59%

 

*As provided by AACP for applicants offered at least one acceptance. 

 


 VII. Dentistry

         

          Fifty of the 54 dental schools in the United States subscribe to the AADSAS (American Association of Dental Schools Application Service).  UT - Memphis nor the University of Mississippi participate in this service, but Meharry College does.  All require the DAT test.

         
The AADSAS now has an electronic dental school application.  This innovative service will allow college students and others applying to dental school through AADSAS to complete their application electronically through their website and to submit it directly to them without having to complete a paper application.  This

effort culminates two years of intense efforts by AADS staff, the AADSAS

Task Force, Liaison International (an IT consulting firm in Boston also

involved with dental education at the BU School of Dental Medicine), and the

AADS Executive Committee.  It is a user-friendly andefficient electronic service that is attractive to applicants, most of whom are highly IT savvy.  This innovation puts the AADSAS at the forefront of application services in the health professions arena, and responds to the expectations and needs of today's applicants and college health professions advisors.  It will allow for electronic submission of the application,

improving efficiency, accuracy and timeliness for our member schools. 

 

If you would like to check out the AADSAS web application yourself you

should go to the AADS web site at:

 

1. http://WWW.AADS.JHU.EDU and

2. select Student Applicant and Advisor Information

3. select AADS's On-Line Dental School Application

4. select continue

5. Go through all three sections of instructions

6. select Go to New Application

7. Fill in name, etc.

8. You must now create a dummy account. In the box called Enter a User Name

type in the first four spaces the word test and then add anything you want

to create your user name.  I would use testdon, for example.

9. Enter password and confirm and

10. Behold, you are there

11. Have fun.

 

         The DAT exam is available only in electronic form.  It can be taken at any Sylvan Learning Center, virtually any day of the year.

 

Details about the DAT, excerpted from http://www.ada.org/prof/ed/testing/dat/index.asp

You must apply to take the test with the ADA and receive your eligibility letter prior to scheduling your testing appointment with Prometric. Tests are administered year-round at Prometric Test Centers Link opens in separate window. Pop-up Blocker may need to be disabled.in the United States, it's territories including Guam, Puetrto Rico, and the U.S. Virgin Islands, and Canada.

Dental Admission Test Blackout Dates
Due to scheduled maintenance, there will be no testing during the following dates: 

2/7/2009 to 2/28/2009
4/9/2009 to 4/30/2009

Advanced Scheduling
To increase the likelihood you will receive your first choice of date, time and location, you should schedule 60 to 90 days before the desired test date. Please remember, you may schedule your testing appointment with Prometric only upon receipt of your eligibility letter.

Rescheduling Testing Appointments
Rescheduling your testing appointment will result in a rescheduling fee.

Canceling Testing Appointments
Canceling your testing appointment will result in a complete forfeiture of your testing fee (as noted in Step 2 above, testing fees are nonrefundable).

Test Preparation Material
The Dental Admission Testing Program does not endorse any test preparation courses and has no data on the content or efficacy of test preparation courses designed to prepare examinees to take the DAT. The Department of Testing Services urges individuals considering participating in test preparation courses to review carefully the course materials to ensure that they reflect the current content of the DAT.

Step 4: Take the Test at a Prometric Test Center
Examinees who experience concerns about scheduling issues, testing conditions, or any unresolved problem should inform the Test Administrator before leaving the test center and record this information in the appropriate section of the post-test survey. For issues requiring further action, examinees must contact the Dental Admission Testing Program within five business days of the testing appointment.

Step 5: Scores
Immediately upon completion of the DAT, an unofficial score report is provided to directly to you at the Prometric Testing Center. This unofficial report is subject to review and audit for accuracy before official reporting of scores. This will be your only copy. No other score report will be sent to you.

Official score reports will be sent directly to dental schools requested on the DAT application approximately 3–4 weeks after the test; five score reports are included in the application fee.

Requests for score reports after the test are subject to delay and additional expense. Once an application has been submitted, no score report request changes will be allowed. Use the form below for information on how to estimate your score or to request an additional score report.


Purpose of the Test
The testing program is designed to measure general academic ability, comprehension of scientific information, and perceptual ability. While all dental schools require examinees to participate in the Dental Admission Testing Program, test results are only one factor considered in evaluating the admission potential of an examinee.

Contact Information
ADA Department of Testing Services
211 East Chicago Avenue, Suite 600
Chicago, IL 60611

800-232-1694
E-mail Us

 

 

If you are planning on applying to UT - Memphis, you will be expected to log in and verify 150 volunteer or paid hours in a dental clinic as part of your application portfolio.

 

College of Dentistry (UT-Memphis): 

 

What They Want

# Hours

What We Call It

Biology

8

BIOL 111 Lec & Lab
BIOL 112 Lec & Lab

Other Biology (Applicants must take one of the following):

·        Histology

·        Microbiology

·        Comparative anatomy

 

 

4

 

 

BIOL 415

BIOL 312

BIOL 212

General Chemistry

8

CHEM 113 Lec & Lab
CHEM 114 Lec & Lab

Organic Chemistry

8

CHEM 211 Lec & Lab
CHEM 212 Lec & Lab

Biochemistry

4

CHEM 312 Lec & Lab

General Physics

8

PHYS 201 Lec & Lab
PHYS 202 Lec & Lab

Electives

52

See list*

*Elective courses can be chosen from the following:  genetics, comparative anatomy, developmental biology, cell biology, histology, microbiology, molecular biology, physiology, and neurobiology.

 

Non-science elective courses may be chosen from philosophy, business administration, economics, public speaking, computer science and courses in the social sciences. 

 

 

Some Useful Sources of Information:

American Association of Dental Schools
<http://www.aads.org>

Schools in the Mid-South (Direct Inquiries to):

Mississippi

University of Mississippi
Dr. James Brown
, Associate Dean
School of Dentistry
2500 North State Street
Jackson, MS 39216

(601) 984-6009
1997 statistics: 121 applicants, 31 matriculated students

Tennessee

Meharry Medical College
Allen D. Mosley, M.S., Director
Meharry Medical College

1005 D.B. Todd Boulevard
Nashville, TN 37208

(615) 327-6223
1997 statistics: 1313 applicants, 50 matriculated students.

J. Stansill Covington, III, D.D.S., M.S., F.R.S.M., Associate Dean, Admissions & Student Affairs (Interim)
University of Tennessee Health Science Center
875 Union Avenue        
Memphis, TN 38163
(901) 448-6201 or (800) 788-0400

Test Preparation Programs:

Kaplan, Inc.
1-800-KAP-TEST
E-mail:
Info@kaplan.com
On America Online, keyword: kaplan
On the Internet’s World Wide Web:
http://www.kaplan.com
Local Office:
Kaplan, Inc.
4515 Poplar Avenue, Suite 330
Memphis, TN 38117-7503

(901) 767-1861; 767-3213 (FAX)

Williams & Wilkins
(Publisher of Betz Preparation Materials)
1-800-634-4365

E-mail: custserv@wwilkins.com
W&W on line
catalog
http://www.wwilkins.com
Home page:
http://www.wwilkins.com/sor

 
VIII. Medical Technology

          "Because changes in body fluids, tissues, and cells are often a sign that something is wrong, clinical laboratory testing has come to play a crucial role in the detection and diagnosis of disease. Medical technologists perform these tests in conjunction with pathologists (physicians who diagnose the cause and nature of disease) and other physicians, or scientists who specialize in clinical chemistry, microbiology, or the other biological sciences. Medical technologists develop data on the blood, tissues, and fluids in the human body by using a variety of precision instruments…." From Stanfield, Peggy S. 1995. Introduction to the Health Professions, 2nd edition. Jones and Bartlett, Publishers.

UT - Memphis College of Allied Health Sciences (Medical Technology): (Modified March 25, 2009)

What They Want

# Hours

What We Call It

Biology

8

BIOL 111 Lec & Lab
BIOL 112 Lec & Lab

General Chemistry

8

CHEM 113 Lec & Lab
CHEM 114 Lec & Lab

Organic Chemistry

8

CHEM 211 Lec & Lab
CHEM 212 Lec & Lab

English and/or Communication skills*

6

ENG 112
ENG 112

Biology - Human Anatomy & Physiology

3

BIOL 217 Lec & Lab
BIOL 218 Lec & Lab

College Algebra

3

MATH 117

Electives

25

Free to choose

Human A & P: Although the requirement is for only three hours, we suggest that you will have a more comprehensive understanding of human anatomy and physiology by taking the BIOL 217-218 sequence.

Regarding Recommended courses:. We suggest taking all courses which are designated as recommended.

          *Three hours of English can be substituted with a 3-hour speech class. We do not recommend that.

Some Useful Sources of Information:

American Society for Clinical Laboratory Science
Member Services
7910 Woodmont Avenue
Suite 1301

Bethesda, MD 20814

(301) 657-2768 (Voice)
Web Page:
http://www.ascls.org

American Society of Clinical Pathologists
Board of Registry
P.O. Box 12270
Chicago, IL 60612
1-800-621-4142
http://www.ascp.org

American Medical Technologists
710 Higgins Road
Park Ridge, IL 60068
International Society for Clinical Laboratory Technology
818 Olive Street, Suite 918
St. Louis, MO 63101

For information about the program at the University of Tennessee - Memphis:

College of Allied Health Sciences
Program in Medical Technology
UT Memphis
800 Madison Avenue
Memphis, TN 38163
Phone number: (901) 448-6304
e-mail address:
cls@utmem.edu
Web page: http://www.utmem.edu/allied/Med.Tech/med.tech.html
Program Director: Linda L. Ross, MS, MT (ASCP) CLS

IX. Physical Therapy

          "Physical therapists, or PT’s, are health care professionals who evaluate and treat people with health problems resulting from injury or disease. PT’s assess joint motion, muscle strength and endurance, function of heart and lungs, and performance of activities required in daily living, among other responsibilities…Although many physical therapists practice in hospitals, more than 70 percent practice in private physical therapy offices, community health centers, industrial health centers, sports facilities, rehabilitation centers, nursing homes, home health agencies, schools or pediatric centers…." From Internet Home Page of the American Physical Therapy Association, http://www.apta.org/

DOCTOR OF PHYSICAL THERAPY

AT THE UNIVERSITY OF TENNESSEE HEALTH SCIENCE CENTER

General Information

The Department of Physical Therapy is located within the College of Allied Health Sciences. The program is designed as a "4 + 3" program that leads to the Doctor of Physical Therapy degree. Students complete four years of preprofessional coursework at other colleges or universities, and then complete three years of professional education on the campus of the University of Tennessee, Health Science Center. Candidates are required to have a baccalaureate degree prior to admission. Students matriculate in the fall semester and graduate at the end of the winter/spring semester (June), three years later, after completion of all academic and clinical internship requirements.

Clinical internship sites are located in Memphis, throughout Tennessee, and in surrounding states. Due to the limited number of clinical sites in Memphis and other urban areas, students should anticipate the financial impact of traveling and living out of town for the majority of their clinical internships. The intent of the clinical internships is to provide the student with a broad exposure to physical therapy practice in a variety of settings and geographic locations. As a rule, no student will be allowed to complete all clinical internship experiences in any one geographic location.

Admission Requirements

To be eligible for consideration for admission, applicants must fulfill the requirements listed below. Meeting the minimum requirements does NOT assure admission to the Doctor of Physical Therapy program. Priority is given to residents of Tennessee and children of UT System alumni. Arkansas and Mississippi residents may apply but must have an exceptionally good academic record to be considered for admission. Applicants whose native language is not English must submit results of the TOEFL, with minimal score of 550.

1.       A baccalaureate degree which includes prerequisite courses for the Program must be completed prior to enrollment, with a minimum cumulative grade point average of 2.00 on a 4.00 scale. Grades of "D" in required courses are not acceptable.

          -        If a required course is repeated, both grades are calculated into the cumulative GPA, but the credit hours assigned to the course may be counted only once in fulfilling the required number of hours.

          -        Credit hours earned for non-theory courses in physical education, music, and military science are not accepted in fulfillment of prerequisite hours or as elective hours.

          -        Credit for science courses completed more than five years prior to application will be carefully reviewed by the Admissions Committee and may not be accepted in fulfillment of the required number of hours.

          -        Courses completed in a PTA program may not be used in fulfillment of any science course required for admission to the UT Memphis physical therapy program. Selected coursework completed in a PTA program may be accepted in partial fulfillment of the required number of elective hours.

                -               Experience has shown that generally a cumulative GPA of at least 3.00 must be presented for an applicant to be competitive.

- Priority is given to students who have completed at least a portion of each required course sequence by the fall term prior to application.

2. A competitive score on the verbal and quantitative sections of the Graduate Record Examination will be required.

3.       A completed application and application fee must be received by the Department of Enrollment Services on or before January 15 prior to the September class for which admission is sought. The following additional materials must be received by the Department of Enrollment Services prior to any final action taken by the Admissions Committee.

          -        Pre-Professional Advisory Committee recommendation from each college or university attended for more than one term

          -        Official transcript from each college or university attended.

          -        Projected plan for completion of remaining required courses which include date(s) and name(s) of institution at which student plans to enroll

            -           Verification of completion of American history in high school or college

4. A personal interview is required for admission.

5. Applicants must demonstrate good physical and mental health consistent with the demands of the educational program.

6. Applicants who accept a position in the program must declare the ability to fulfill the Technical Standards for Admission to the College of Allied Health Sciences, Program in Physical Therapy.

Prior to enrollment, the following courses, described in the UTHSC Admissions Requirement Brochure, must be completed with grades of "C" or better.

College of Allied Health Sciences -- Doctorate in Physical Therapy (UT - Memphis)

What They Want

# Hours

What We Call It

General Biology*

8

BIOL 111 Lec & Lab
BIOL 112 Lec & Lab

General Chemistry*       

8

CHEM 113 Lec & Lab
CHEM 114 Lec & Lab

General Physics*

8

PHYS 201 Lec & Lab
PHYS 202 Lec & Lab

English

6

ENG 111
ENG 112

Human Anatomy and Physiology*

8

BIOL 217 Lec & Lab
BIOL 218 Lec & Lab

Mathematics1

3

One of the following:

  • MATH 117
  • MATH 131
  • MATH 105
  • MATH 117

(Their website specifies MATH 101, which does not exist.)

Computer Sciences2

3

MIS 153 (formerly ITM 153)

Statistics3

3

Must include descriptive, t-test, Chi-square, ANOVA

Psychology4

6

PSYC 105 & PSYC 218

Humanities/Social Sciences5

12

Four courses with any of the following prefixes:

PSYC(hology)
SOC(iology)
POLS (Political Science)

Foreign language, fine or performing arts, communication arts

Electives

30

Free to choose

* Must include laboratory experiences

1 Student must complete coursework that fulfills physics prerequisite.

2 If coursework has not been taken, must demonstrate computer literacy in computer technology

3Statistics – course should cover nonparametric and parametric statistics, including analysis of covariance and multivariate analysis of variance. Use of statistical techniques with data sets, interpretation of statistical results and computer interaction in data analysis strongly recommended. Biomedical statistics, education statistics, business statistics, psychology statistics as well as statistics courses in the math department are acceptable.

4Must include General Psychology I and II or General Psychology I and Human Growth and Development

5Recommended courses to complete humanities/social science courses are: (child, adolescent or abnormal) psychology, personality development, psychology of adjustment, sociology, anthropology, economics, counseling, human relations, political science, humanities, art history, philosophy or logic, English literature, history, foreign language, fine arts, religion

Some Useful Sources of Information:

For more information on a career in physical therapy, please send a self-addressed, stamped envelope to "A Future In Physical Therapy, "APTA, P.O. Box 37257, Washington, D.C. 20013.

American Physical Therapy Association
1111 North Fairfax Street
Alexandria, VA 22314

Telephone: (703) 684-2782
FAX:           (703) 706-3396
Web page:
http://www.apta.org

Physical therapy programs in the Mid-South:

University of Tennessee - Memphis (PT only)

College of Allied Health Sciences
UT Memphis
800 Madison Avenue
Memphis, TN 38163

(901) 448-5888
E-mail:
pt@utmem.edu
http://www.utmem.edu/physther/mpt.Intro

Arkansas State University (PT & PT assistant)
Department of Health Professions
P.O. Box 69
State University, Arkansas 72467-0069
(501) 972-3073 JONESBORO

X.Occupational Therapy

"Occupational therapists are health professionals who use 'occupation', or purposeful activities with specific goals, to help people of all ages prevent, lessen, or overcome disabilities. The activities may be as basic as bathing, dressing or eating, or as complex as operating a computer with modified control switches. Those who work in occupational therapy use their personal and professional skills to help people deal with health problems that interfere with their ability to function in daily life.

When a patient is referred for treatment, the occupational therapist assesses that individual's ability to carry out necessary developmental, physical, social and emotional functions in relation to his or her prognosis. The assessment and analysis of the individual's personal goals and the demands of his or her environment are reviewed and become the basis of an individualized treatment program. During the course of treatment, the occupational therapist frequently reassesses the patient's status and coordinates the occupational therapy program with that of the other members of the health care team." From the promotional flyer regarding the UT - Memphis Occupational Therapy Program, 1999.

From a brochure entitled Occupational Therapy Makes It Possible, distributed by the American Occupational Therapy Association:

Sometime in our lives many of us will face physical, cognitive, or mental health challenges that will prevent us from being as independent and active as we'd like. These challenges can begin at birth, develop gradually later in life, or arise suddenly at any age.

Occupational therapy makes it possible for people facing such challenges to participate more fully in the job of living at home and at school, at work and at play.

Occupational therapy helps children and adults acquire daily living skills needed to engage in meaningful activities, ranging from self-care such as dressing and feeding oneself to work, school, leisure, and community pursuits. People who choose a career in occupational therapy are part of a vibrant, dynamic profession that serves millions of people each year.

For example, more than one fourth of the nation's occupational therapy professionals focus on helping children thrive in the "occupations" of childhood -- learning, playing, and growing.

Many occupational therapy professionals work at schools, offering students the skills and confidence needed to confront learning disabilities or behavioral problems. They also work with youngsters with developmental disabilities like cerebral palsy and Down Syndrome to become as independent as possible.

Occupational therapy professionals help premature newborns learn oral-motor skills needed for eating, and show parents and their children with disabilities how assistive technology can enrich their lives.

For someone who has experienced a traumatic experience, such as an injury, stroke, or amputation, occupational therapy professionals ease the transition from hospital to home by showing survivors new ways to dress, eat, bathe, cook, do laundry, drive, and work. Often, they recommend special technology -- from simple devices like button hooks to sophisticated, computerized systems -- that make routine tasks simpler and give persons with disabilities access to a greater range of activities.

Occupational therapy professionals also can suggest ways to adapt a person's home, school, or work environment to make it safer; to conserve energy; and to enhance comfort, independence and productivity.

College of Allied Health Sciences - Occupational Therapy (UT - Memphis):

The Program in Occupational Therapy is designed as the third and fourth years of a baccalaureate program, and consists of 24 months on the campus of the University of Tennessee, Memphis or clinical education sites. To be eligible for consideration for admission, the applicant must fulfill the following requirements:

Please note: The Occupational Therapy program at the University of Tennessee Health Science Center - Memphis is an entry level Master's program.

What They Want

# Hours

What We Call It

General Biology/Including Zoology

8

BIOL 111 Lec & Lab
BIOL 112 Lec & Lab

General Chemistry

8

CHEM 113 Lec & Lab
CHEM 114 Lec & Lab

General Physics

8

PHYS 201 Lec & Lab
PHYS 202 Lec & Lab

English (recommend one course in speech)

9

ENG 111
ENG 112
SPCH 125

Anatomy & Physiology

8

BIOL 217 Lec & Lab
BIOL 218 Lec & Lab

Psychology, including:

  • General Psychology
  • Human Development
  • Abnormal Psychology

 

 

9

 

PSYC 105

PSYC 218

PSYC 230

Sociology

3

SOC 101

Electives**

19

"The faculty suggest that elective courses be taken from the following areas: Computer skills, Anatomy, Kinesiology, Physiology; plus a broad selection from: Anthroplogy, Education, Fine and Performing Arts, History, Humanities, Language and Communication Systems, Mathematics, Philosophy, and Western Civilization. No more than four credits in activity-based courses are acceptable.

Total: 64

For additional information:

The American Occupational Therapy Association, Inc.

4720 Montgomery lane
P.O. B. 21220
Bethesda, MD 20824-1220
1-301-652-2682
http://www.aota.org/

For more information about the UT Memphis Department of Occupational Therapy
Call Diane Garrison at 1-901-448-8393, or write
822 Beale Street
Memphis, TN 38163
Start by accessing:
http://www.utmem.edu/occ_therapy/home.html
Mail to:
anolen.utmem.edu

 

XI.Dental Hygiene

"Dental hygiene is a preventive oral health profession whose practitioners support total health and are responsible for promoting optimal oral health for people of all ages. In doing so, dental hygienists facilitate the prevention and treatment of oral diseases such as dental caries (cavities) and periodontal (gum) disease. Dental hygienists, working with dentists, carefully monitor the oral health status of their patients and intervene as necessary with a variety of therapeutic services. Specific professional activities of the dental hygienist may include:

  • Initial screening examination and charting of a patient's teeth, soft tissue, and other oral structures;
  • Exposing and developing radiographs;
  • Developing individualized oral hygiene programs for plaque control;
  • Removing calculus and plaque from above and below the gumline;
  • Applying caries-preventive agents such as fluoride and dental sealants."

(From the promotional brochure describing the Dental Hygienist program at the University of Tennessee - Memphis.)

College of Allied Health Sciences - Dental Hygiene (UT - Memphis):

          The Program in Dental Hygiene is designed as the third and fourth years of a baccalaureate program, and consists of 2 academic years of full-time instruction. Thirty-four (34) students are accepted into the program each year. The program is fully accredited by the Commission on Dental Accreditation of the American Dental Association. For consideration for admission, the applicant must fulfill the following requirements: 

What They Want

# Hours

We Call It

General Biology

4

BIOL 111 Lec & Lab

General Chemistry

8

CHEM 113 Lec & Lab
CHEM 114 Lec & Lab

English

9

ENG 111
ENG 112
One English elective

Speech

3

SPCH 125

General Psychology

6

PSYC 105 & 1 PSYC elective

Nutrition

3

BIOL 236

General Sociology

6

SOC 101 & 1 SOC elective

Microbiology

4

BIOL 321 Lec & Lab**

Anatomy & Physiology

8

BIOL 217 Lec & Lab**
BIOL 218 Lec & Lab**

Electives

7

Free to choose***

Total: 58

**In order to take these courses, you would have to take BIOL 112 Lec and Lab, CHEM 211 Lec and Lab, and CHEM 212 Lec and Lab as CBU prerequisites. They can be fit into the electives.

For more information:

American Dental Hygienists' Association (ADHA)
http://www.adha.org

For more information about the UT-Memphis program in Dental Hygiene:
Peggy Waring, Ed.D.
Program Director
Dept. of Dental Hygiene
822 Beale Street
Memphis, TN 38163

1-901-448-6230
http://www.utmem.edu/dent_hyg/dh.html
E-mail:
jdavis@utmem.edu

XII.Cytotechnology

"A cytotechnologist is a highly skilled laboratory professional who examines cells under a microscope to diagnose cancer and a variety of other diseases processes. These individuals must know basic human anatomy, physiology and pathology, and have an in-depth knowledge of cell morphology in order to interpret varied cytology specimens accurately. They use specialized techniques for collecting, preparing and staining many types of cell samples. Cytotechnologists are trained to recognize minute abnormalities in color, size and shape of the cell structures.

An individual considering a career in cytotechnology should be able to perform work that requires precision and sound judgement. Manual dexterity, dependability, and good vision including color vision are also important characteristics. Since the expertise of the cytotechnologist is relied upon in assuring high quality patient care, individuals who want to become cytotechnologists should have a high degree of integrity and be willing to assume a great deal of responsibility. Cytotechnologists play an integral part in the total health care of patients. They must, at all times, be aware that each specimen represents a patient and that accuracy of the diagnostic report is essential." (From the promotional flyer describing the UT - Memphis program.)

College of Allied Health Sciences - Cytotechnology (UT - Memphis):

The Program in Cytotechnology is designed as the fourth year of a baccalaureate degree program. It consists of one year on the campus of the University of Tennessee - Memphis. A maximum of 10 students can be accepted into the program each year. Upon successful completion of the program, students are awarded a Bachelor of Science Degree in Cytotechnology. The program is fully accredited by the Programs Commission on Accreditation of Allied Health Education Programs (CAAHEP), formerly known as CAHEA. For consideration for admission, the applicant must fulfill the following requirements:

                                      

What They Want

# Hours

What We Call It

General Biology

8

BIOL 111 Lec & Lab

BIOL 112 Lec & Lab

General Chemistry

8

CHEM 113 Lec & Lab

CHEM 114 Lec & Lab

English

9

ENG 111

ENG 112

One English electives

Microbiology

3

BIOL 321 Lec & Lab**

Advanced Biology

15

Recommended:

·        Immunology (BIOL 415)**

·        Histology (BIOL 414)**

·        Cell/Molecular Biology (BIOL 421)**

·        Genetics (BIOL 311)**

·        Anatomy and Physiology I and II (BIOL 217 and BIOL 218)**I

Social Science

12

Can include PSYC or SOC courses, such as PSYC 105, PSYC 218, SOC 101

College Mathematics

3

MATH 117

Electives

30

Free to choose

 

Total:            85

**In order to take these courses, you must take CHEM 211 Lec & Lab and CHEM 212 Lec and Lab as CBU prerequisites.  They can be fit in as electives.

***In order to take these courses at CBU, you must also be enrolled in CHEM 211 Lec and Lab.

 

For more information about cytotechnology:

UT - Memphis Program in Cytotechnology
Phone Number (901) 448-6304
e-mail:
cls@utmem.edu
Web page: http://www.utmem.edu/allied/Cytology/cytology.html
Program Director: Barbara Benstein, Ms, SCT (ASCP)

American Society of Clinical Pathologists
P.O. Box 12270
Chicago, IL 60612

http://www.amcp.org
1-800-621-4142

American Society for Cytotechnology
Web page:
http://www.asct.com


XIII.Health Information Management

"A career in health information management combines the exciting, challenging world of medicine with computerization, business, and management into one excellent career. While health information management (HIM) professionals possess skills similar to those of other business professionals, they must draw from a broader base of knowledge. Their knowledge of business and science is combined with a knowledge of law and medicine. While HIM professionals may not be as visible as the physician, nurse, or other health professional, their presence is vital to keeping the facility functioning smoothly.

As health information becomes more computerized, the health information manager is involved in designing and maintaining health information systems for insurance companies, accounting firms, consulting firms, as well as health care organizations." (From the promotional flyer describing the UT - Memphis program in Health Information Management.)

College of Allied Health Sciences - Health Information Management (UT - Memphis):

The Program in Health Information Management is designed as the fourth year of a baccalaureate degree program. The program is for one calendar year in length, and students are assigned to off-campus sites for a five-week management affiliation experience as part of the education program. The program is fully accredited by the American Health Information Management Association (AHIMA) and the Commission on Accreditation of Allied Health Education Programs (CAAHEP) For consideration for admission, the applicant must fulfill the following requirements:

 

What They Want

# Hours

What We Call It

General Biology

8

BIOL 111 Lec & Lab*
BIOL 112 Lec & Lab*

Human Anat. & Phys.

8

BIOL 217 Lec & Lab**
BIOL 218 Lec & Lab**

English

12

ENG 111
ENG 112
2 3-credit electives

Management, Business & Office Administration (1course in Management required)

12

MGMT 337

(Computer Literacy highly recommended):
ITM 153

Other courses in the following subjects are acceptable: Accounting - ACCT 261 & 262 Finance - FIN 327 & 328

Business Law - BUS 301 & 302

Computer Science - CS 161, 162

Wage & Salary Admin. - MGMT 412

Psychology

6

PSYC 105
1 3-credit elective, e.g. PSYC 218

Social Science

6

Two courses in:
SOC(iology)
HIST(ory)
POL(itical science)

Statistics

3

STAT 201 or MATH 201

Speech

3 (Recommended)

SPCH 125

Electives

35

Free to choose

Total: 90

*In order to take BIOL 111 and BIOL 112, you must have MATH 117 or its equivalent as a pre- or co-requisite.

**In order to take BIOL 217 and 218, you must have CHEM 113 as a prerequisite.

For more information:

About the UT - Program

Chair
Dept. of Health Information Management
The University of Tennessee - Memphis
822 Beale, Suite 300
Memphis, TN 38163
(901) 448-6486
Web site:
http://www.utmem.edu/him/homepage.htm
Mail to: MMCAIN@UTMEM.EDU

About the career

American Health Information Management Association
919 North Michigan Avenue, Suite 1400
Chicago, Illinois 60611
(312) 787-2672

About accreditation

CAAHEP
515 North State Street, Suite 7530
Chicago, IL 60610-4377
(312) 464-4636

XIV. Nursing:

          "Registered nurses care for the sick and injured and help people stay well…Hospital nurses constitute by far the largest group of nurses. Most are staff nurses, who provide skilled bedside nursing care and carry out the medical regimen prescribed by physicians…Nursing home nurses manage nursing care for residents with different needs [e.g. Alzheimer’s disease]…Public health nurses work in government and private agencies and clinics, schools, retirement communities, and other community settings…Private duty nurses care for patients needing constant attention…They provide services in homes, hospitals, nursing homes, and rehabilitation centers…Occupational health or industrial nurses provide nursing care at worksites, to employees, customers, and others with minor injuries and illnesses…Head nurses or nurse supervisors direct nursing activities.

The Lowenburg School of Nursing at the University of Memphis offers several BSN programs.  Here is a general description of their BSN programs, from

Bachelors of Science in Nursing

The Loewenberg School of Nursing BSN program prepare students for careers in professional nursing.  As part of a comprehensive university, the school is dedicated to developing scholarship in nursing and provide services that support the institutional mission.  The program is designed to accommodate the needs of high school graduates, transfer students and college graduates, and registered nurses who are graduates of diploma or associate degree nursing programs.

Our school offers four options in its BSN undergraduate degree program:

Student Outcomes of the BSN Program

The baccalaureate program prepares the graduate to:

1.     Apply leadership and decision-making skills to create a safe, caring environment necessary for the delivery of quality care within dynamic health systems.

2.     Translate current clinical and research-based evidence into practice to improve patient health outcomes.

3.     Incorporate patient care technologies with information and communication systems to provide evidence-based care that is safe and cost effective.

4.     Participate in healthcare policy and political processes to positively influence socio-cultural, economic, legal and political factors that shape healthcare delivery and professional nursing practice.

5.     Communicate and collaborate effectively both interprofessionally and intraprofessionally to optimize patient health outcomes.

6.     Implement clinical prevention and health promotion strategies to improve patient health outcomes.

7.     Emulate professional values and ethical behaviors in all dimensions of nursing practice.

Regarding the two fast-track programs:

The Loewenberg School of Nursing (LSON) offers two fast track options in obtaining the Bachelor of Science in Nursing degree - Fast Track and +Accelerated Fast Track.


Fast Track - click here to view Sample Curriculum Pattern

The fast track option begins in either the *Fall or **Spring term.

*Fall - Spring - Summer [Pre-Summer, 1st and 2nd term] - Fall - Spring
**Spring - Fall - Spring - Summer [Pre-Summer, 1st and 2nd term] - Fall

The following requirements must be met for the Fast Track option:

  • Completion of all General Education courses
  • Completion of nursing pre-requisites (for admission to the BSN program)
  • Acceptance in the BSN program
  • Approval from the LSON Associate Dean of Undergraduate Programs

Accelerated Fast Track - click here to view Sample Curriculum Pattern

+To qualify for the Accelerated Fast Track option, students must have a minimum grade of "B" in every nursing course during the first semester of the BSN program and must obtain permission from the LSON Associate Dean of Undergraduate Programs.

The accelerated fast track option only begins in the Fall term.

Fall - Spring - Summer [Pre-Summer, 1st and 2nd term] - Fall

The following requirements must be met for the Accelerated Fast Track option:

  • Approval from the LSON Associate Dean of Undergraduate Programs
  • Completion of all General Education courses
  • Completion of all nursing pre-requisites
  • Minimum grade of "B" in each of the 1st semester nursing courses

 

Union University-Germantown campus also offers an accelerated post-baccalaureate BSN program, described at http://www.uu.edu/academics/adultstudies/acceleratedbsn/ :

UnionUAcceleratedBSN_Page_1.jpg

UnionUAcceleratedBSN_Page_2.jpg

 

National organizations of nursing schools have mandated that the entry-level clinical practice degree will be a Master’s Degree.  The UTHSC program is committed to admit its first entry-level Master’s students in the Fall 2009. 

From the description of the University of Tennessee Clinical Nurse Leader Program:, http://www.utmem.edu/nursing/bemorenursing/prereq.php 

Clinical Nurse LeaderFull-time, primarily face-to-face, four-term program for individuals who hold a bachelor’s degree or higher in a non-nursing field from a regionally accredited college or university (or approved international equivalent) seeking professional entry to nursing practice and RN licensure, including the prerequisite courses shown in Prerequisite Courses Table.  (Note: The prerequisite requirements show that individuals may not enter the CNL program directly from high school.)

CNL is for individuals who hold a bachelor’s degree or higher in a non-nursing field seeking professional entry to nursing practice and RN licensure.

 

Courses required

Semester Hours

What We Call Them

Human Anatomy & Physiology

8, with lab

BIOL 217 Lecture & Lab
BIOL 218 Lecture & Lab

Microbiology

minimum 3 hours, with lab

BIOL 321 Lecture & Lab

Statistics

3

MATH 201 or  PSYC 354 or STAT 201

Lifespan Development/ Psychology

Recommended
(Not required)

PSYC 218

Humanities/The Arts

Recommended
(Not required)

Any Art (ART), Humanities (HUM), Literature, or Music (MUSC) or foreign language

Nutrition

Recommended
(Not required)

BIOL 236

Psychology

Recommended
(Not required)

PSYC 105

Sociology

Recommended
(Not required)

SOC 101

Anthropology

Recommended
(Not required)

ANTH 128 (Physical) or ANTH 160 (Cultural)

 

For more information about other programs in the Memphis area, contact:

Baptist Memorial College of Health Sciences
1003 Monroe Avenue
Memphis, TN 38104

1-800-796-7171

Arkansas State University
Department of Health Professions
P.O. Box 69
State University, Arkansas 72467-0069

(501) 972-3073 JONESBORO

Union University – Germantown Office
UU/Germantown Campus
2745 Hacks Cross Road
Germantown, TN 38138
Contact: Wendy Glass
E-mail: wglass@uu.edu
Phone: 901-312-1901
FAX: 901-759-1197

University of Memphis Lowenburg School of Nursing
Loewenberg School of Nursing
Phone: 901.678.2003
Fax: 901.678.4906
Mail: 100 Billy Mac Jones
Memphis, TN 38152

University of Tennessee Health Science Center College of Nursing
877 Madison Avenue
Memphis, Tennessee 38163
901-448-6128
Fax: 901-448-4121
Toll Free: 800-733-2498
Program Inquiries:  901-448-6125
Justin Casey, Student Affairs – Coordinator:  jcasey4@utmem.edu
Janet Wood, Student Affairs – Coordinator: jwood26@utmem.edu
Roylynn Germain, Student Affairs – Administrative Assistant:  rgermain@utmem.edu

 

Some Useful Sources of Information:

The National League for Nursing
350 Hudson Street
New York, NY 10014

Information on career opportunities for registered nurses is available from

Kathy Milholland, Ph.D., RN
American Nurses’ Association
600 Maryland Avenue S.W., #100W
Washington, DC 20024-2571

(202) 651-7060 FAX: (202) 651-7001
e-mail:
KMILHOLL@ANA.ORG

For information on nursing careers in hospitals, contact:

American Hospital Association
Division of Nursing
810 North Lake Shore Drive
Chicago, IL 60611

XV. Optometry:

          "Optometrists are primary eye care providers who examine people’s eyes to diagnose and in some cases treat vision problems and eye diseases…Optometrists prescribe eyeglasses, contact lenses, vision therapy, and low-vision aids. They use drugs for diagnosis in all states and, as of 1991, they may use drugs to treat some eye diseases in 28 states." From Stanfield, Peggy S. 1995. Introduction to the Health Professions, edition 2, Jones and Bartlett, publishers.

OptomCAS offers applicants a convenient, web-based application that will allow them to apply to more than one participating optometry school or college with one application.  ALL twenty schools and colleges of optometry will participate.    

The OptomCAS website is now available at www.optomcas.org.  This includes an FAQ section that may be helpful to you and your students.  This website will be updated on a continuous basis as the application launch date approaches.  In addition, we plan to host webinars for those advisors who may be interested.  Information will be sent shortly. 

If you have any questions, please email Paige Pence at ppence@opted.org

Paige Pence, Director, Student and Professional Affairs
Association of Schools & Colleges of Optometry
6110 Executive Boulevard, Suite 420
Rockville, MD  20852
(301) 231-5944, x3019
(301) 770-1828 Fax
http://www.opted.org

 

Conditions typically treated by Doctors of Optometry include:

  • Diseases and disorders of the anterior segment of the eye such as corneal abrasions/ulcers/infections, glaucoma and the management of other ocular diseases and conditions.
  • Visual skills problems such as the effective ability to move align, fixate and focus the ocular mechanisms as in reading, driving, computer use, hobbies, etc.
  • The inability to properly process and interpret visual information such as in problems of perception, visualization and retention as in the learning task.
  • Poor vision-body coordination as one interacts with the environment such as in sports, occupations, or just everyday spatial judgments.
  • Clarity problems, be they simple near or farsightedness, astigmatism, or the complications due to the aging process, disease, trauma or malfunction.

Doctors of Optometry are also concerned with:

  • The diagnosis, management and referral, when required, of such systemic diseases as hypertension, diabetes and others which are often first detected in the eye.
  • Provide pre- and post-surgical care of cataracts, refractive laser treatment, retinal problems, and other conditions that require pre- and post-surgical care.
  • Preventative measures as in infants and children's visual development, job/school/hobby related tasks, and nutrition and hygiene education

 

Prerequisites for the Southern College of Optometry

What They Want

# Hours

What We Call It

General Biology

8

BIOL 111 Lec & Lab
BIOL 112 Lec & Lab

General Chemistry

8

CHEM 113 Lec & Lab
CHEM 114 Lec & Lab

Organic Chemistry

8

CHEM 211 Lec & Lab
CHEM 212 Lec & Lab

Physics

8

PHYS 150 Lec & Lab*
PHYS 251 Lec & Lab*
PHYS 252 Lec & Lab*

English

6

ENG 111
ENG 112

Microbiology

4

BIOL 321 Lec & Lab

Mathematics (Calculus)

3

MATH 131

Statistics (any type)

3

MATH 201 or BUS 221 or PSYC 356

Social Sciences

6

Any course with the following prefixes:

HIS(tory)
PHIL(osophy)
SOC(iology) or
EDUC 380 (Geography)

Psychology

3

PSYC 105 or upper elective

Anatomy & Physiology (R)

8

BIOL 217 Lec & Lab
BIOL 218 Lec & Lab

*Since the optics courses are calculus-based, we recommend that you take the calculus-based physics sequence at CBU.

                   (R): We suggest taking all such courses which are designated as recommended.

Some Useful Sources of Information:

Southern College of Optometry
1245 Madison Avenue

Memphis, TN 38104
(901) 722-3224
Contact person: Joseph H. Hauser, Asst. Director
Profile of 1998 Entering class:

  • Total Entrants: 122
  • No. Applicants: 1,012

Association of Schools and Colleges of Optometry (ASCO)
6110 Executive Blvd., Suite 510
Rockville, MD 20852

(301) 231-5944
Web Site:
http://www/opted.org

American Optometric Association (AOA)
243 North Lindbergh Blvd.
St. Louis, MO 63141

(314) 991-4100
http://www.aoanet.org/aoanet

Optometry Admission Testing Program (OAT)
211 East Chicago Avenue Suite 1846
Chicago, Illinois 60611 - 2678
(312) 440-2693

Regarding the OAT:

What is the OAT?
The Optometry Admission Test (OAT) is a standardized examination designed to measure general academic ability and comprehension of scientific information. The OAT is sponsored by the Association of Schools and Colleges of Optometry (ASCO) for applicants seeking admission to an optometry program. All schools and colleges of optometry in the United States, and the University of Waterloo, Canada require the OAT.
back to top

What subjects does the OAT cover?
The OAT consists of four tests: Survey of the Natural Sciences (Biology, General Chemistry, and Organic Chemistry), Reading Comprehension, Physics and Quantitative Reasoning.
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When should I take the OAT?
At least one year of college education, which should include courses in biology, general chemistry, organic chemistry and physics, is required prior to taking the OAT. Most students, however, elect to complete two or more years of college prior to taking the exam.
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When is the OAT examination administered?
The OAT exam is computerized and examinees are allowed to take the OAT an unlimited number of times but must wait at least 90 days between testing dates.  However, only scores from the four most recent attempts and the total number of attempts will be reported. 
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Where can I get more information about the OAT?
You can submit your application for the OAT examination and/or request additional copies of score reports online. You can view the Optometry Admission Testing Program - Online Candidate Guide, by clicking here:
http://www.opted.org/../graphics/new2.gifOn-line Registration for OAT. You can request a free OAT candidate guide information booklet and a test application form by contacting the Optometric Admission Testing Program, 211 East Chicago Avenue, 6th Floor, Chicago, IL 60611-2678, (800)232-2159. Only the printed edition of the OAT Candidate Guide contains samples of the four tests used in the Optometry Admission Testing Program.

The Optometry Admission Test is offered in a computerized format.  Testing is available year round – you select the date, time, and place that is most convenient for you to test.  You receive your scores immediately after the completion of the test.  Schools receive official score reports within two weeks.

 

Information about the OAT can be obtained online at http://www.opted.org .  This site contains information about the test, application process, fees, test content, and a sample test.  Use this site to register online for the test and to request additional score reports.  A credit card is required for online registration or two request additional score reports.

 

Information is also available by calling the Optometry Admission Testing program at 1-800-232-2159.  Automated information lines provide select information 24 hours a day, seven days a week.  Representatives are available to assist you Monday through Friday from 8:30 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. Central Time.  Print application materials are available for those special situations where applying online is not possible.  This material can be requested by calling the 800 number.

 

For information about the OAT, visit http://www.opted.org .


XVI. Veterinary Medicine:

From a memo circulated to the HLTHPROF listserv, July 18, 2008:

Electronic Evaluations:
We want to clarify that the VMCAS application can accept a minimum of three (3) and a maximum of five (5) electronic evaluations. It is highly recommended that students follow the evaluation instructions for the school(s) they are applying to as schools have various requirements for evaluations.  All evaluations received by VMCAS are sent to all of the applicants designations.  Evaluations received for an applicant above and beyond the schools requirements are still sent to all the schools being applied to, but are not guaranteed by the school to be reviewed. 
 
Please see our FAQ located here: http://www.aavmc.org/vmcas/vmcas_faq.htm for more information.
 
There are updated instructions regarding evaluations on our website as well as in the VMCAS evaluator section instruction page: http://www.aavmc.org/vmcas/evaluations.htm
 
Composite & Multi-Page Committee Letters:
The VMCAS system cannot currently accommodate multiple page evaluations (composite letters & multi-page committee letters). As such, applicants will be able to download a copy of the evaluation form on our website. 
 
Single Page Committee Letters:
As a result of many requests, single page committee letters can now be submitted through the VMCAS electronic letters of recommendation (eLOR) system, and will be counted as one (1) electronic submission.  The applicant will register the chairperson (or designated alternate) in the eLOR system. This prompts an email to the registrant with instructions on completing the evaluation.
 
Test Accounts:
We welcome those of you who wish to setup a test application. Requests for test accounts in VMCAS should be requested by emailing the VMCAS staff at vmcas@aavmc.org.  You will receive a controlled username and instructions on processing a VMCAS Application.
 
VMCAS NAAHP Presentation:
Weve attached a copy of the VMCAS presentation that was given at the NAAHP Meeting for those that did not attend. 
 
We hope weve addressed any concerns and hope that you will contact us if any matters remain unresolved by calling our Student and Advisor Hotline at 877-862-2740 or email to: vmcas@aavmc.org
 
Shaba Lightfoot, VMCAS Student Affairs Coordinator
Tony Wynne, Operations Manager
John Roane, Chief Operating Officer


Application requirements for all VMCAS colleges are located at the VMCAS link at aavmc.org (http://www.aavmc.org/vmcas/listschools.htm).

 

VETERINARY MEDICAL COLLEGE APPLICATION SERVICE (VMCAS)

FACT SHEET

Association of American Veterinary Medical Colleges (AAVMC)

The AAVMC coordinates the affairs of the 27 U.S. Veterinary Medical Colleges, 4 Canadian Colleges of Veterinary Medicine, Departments of Veterinary Science and Comparative Medicine, animal medical centers, and the University of Glasgow. Additionally, the association fosters the membership's teaching, research and service missions both nationally and internationally. Addressing the interests of producers and consumers of food and fiber, the interests of animal owners, and those of pet owners, AAVMC's principal goal is improving the quality of human and animal life. Specifically, we continue to address societal concerns about food safety, advance veterinary education, improve animal health and well being, strengthen biomedical research and enhance environmental quality. The AAVMC sponsors the Veterinary Medical College Application Service (VMCAS).

Veterinary Medical College Application Service (VMCAS)

VMCAS is a centralized application program for participating Veterinary Medical Colleges. Listed below are the 24 Veterinary Medical Colleges that participate in VMCAS, along with two Canadian Veterinary Medical Colleges, and the University of Glasgow.

VMCAS Colleges

Auburn University

North Carolina State University

University of California-Davis

Ohio State University

Colorado State

Oklahoma State University

Cornell University

Oregon State University

University of Florida

University of Pennsylvania

University of Georgia

Purdue University

University of Illinois-Urbana

University of Tennessee

Iowa State University

Virginia-Maryland Regional College

Kansas State University

Washington State University

Louisiana State University

University of Wisconsin

Michigan State University

University of Glasgow

University of Minnesota

University of Guelph

Mississippi State University

University of Prince Edward Island

University of Missouri

 

VMCAS Instructions

 

Information about the VMCAS process can be found at the VMCAS link at www.aavmc.org.

Basic Application Requirements:

VMCAS Web Application
Transcripts
Three (3) letters of recommendation
VMCAS Application Fee

To access the VMCAS Web Application visit www.aavmc.org and click on VMCAS.

Veterinary Medical School Admission Requirements Book (VMSAR)

VMSAR is a book containing the admission requirements and contact information for all 31 U.S. and Canadian Veterinary Medical Colleges, in addition to the University of Glasgow. VMSAR also provides statistical data on numbers of applications and matriculants, and specific information on the slots available at each college. For ordering information, please check out the Purdue University Press (publisher) Web site at http://www.thepress.purdue.edu/ (ISBN number is 1-55753-168-4), or call (800) 247-6553 (distributor). The price is $16.95, excluding shipping costs.

VMCAS Contact Information

E-mail:        vmcas@aavmc.org        
Telephone:  (202) 682-0750, or
Student/Advisor Toll Free Hotline - 1 (877) 862-2740
Fax:   (202) 682-1122             
Mail: VMCAS
1101 Vermont Ave., NW
Suite 701

Washington, DC 20005

***************************************************************************************************************************

Applicants are encouraged to deliver the VMCAS application weeks before the deadline to avoid system congestion and delayed response times.

 

NAAHP

VMCAS Presentation Summary

July 2002

AAVMC

The Association of American Veterinary Medical Colleges (AAVMC) sponsors the Veterinary Medical College Application Service (VMCAS). AAVMC has five full-time staff and its members consist of 32 veterinary medical colleges, including 4 in Canada and one in Scotland, as well as medical centers and comparative science departments.

 In 1995, AAVMC contracted with a vendor to run a centralized application service, and brought the service in-house three years later. We discovered that the scope and complexity of such a service was difficult to implement; therefore, the association elected to implement the project in several phases. VMCAS is currently in the second phase of development. The phased approach should minimize increases in applicant fees, and future phases are expected to include advisor resources and applicant data reports.

 

Letters of recommendation should be completed using the VMCAS Evaluation Form; actual letters can be attached. Committee letters can serve as multiple recommendation requirements; however, a VMCAS evaluation form must be used for each, and be signed by the author of the recommendation. This standardized form serves many purposes; most importantly, it adds a level of consistency to the admissions selection process.

Test scores and supplemental application requirements vary among colleges. College requirements are listed at www.aavmc.org.

 The Web application, recommendation letters, and the VMCAS fee are sent to VMCAS. Transcripts test scores and supplemental applications are sent to the VMCAS colleges.

Key Dates

May 27       VMCAS application went live

October 1    Application deadline for majority of colleges

November 1         Application deadline for Oregon State University and University of Tennessee

The application launch date was shifted from August to May to encourage applicants to prepare for the application process prior to summer break.

VMCAS Resources

www.aavmc.org

Web application and instructions

VMCAS@aavmc.org    

E-mail

Veterinary Medical School Academic Requirements

Order at www.thepress.purdue.edu, or 800-247-6553

VMCAS College Web sites and Fact Sheet

Both located at www.aavmc.org

Recommendations From Veterinary College Admissions Officers

  • apply early; last-minute applications run the risk of slow response times due to Web and server congestion.
  • have a rigorous science curriculum and extensive veterinary experience
  • take note of the unique requirements for VMCAS colleges.
  • use the VMCAS Evaluation form.
  • call the Student and Advisor Hotline for assistance

 

College of Veterinary Medicine (UT-Knoxville)

                            

What They Want

# Hours

What We Call It

General Biology

8

BIOL 111 Lec & Lab
BIOL 112 Lec & Lab

General Chemistry

8

CHEM 113 Lec & Lab
CHEM 114 Lec & Lab

Organic Chemistry

8

CHEM 211 Lec & Lab
CHEM 212 Lec & Lab

English Composition

6

ENG 111
ENG 112

Humanities and Social Sciences

18

"May include, for example, courses in English literature, speech, music,art, philosophy, religion, language, history, economics,anthropology, political science, psychology, sociology and geography."

Biochemistry

4

CHEM 312 Lec & Lab

Genetics

3

BIOL 311 Lec & Lab

Cellular Biology

3

BIOL 421 Lec & Lab

Some Useful Sources of Information:

VMSAR is available at:

http://www.thepress.purdue.edu/books/vmsar/vmsar.html

and
http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/ASIN/1557532192/o/qid=989352729/sr=2-1/107-1724089-0855732

American Veterinary Medicine Association
930 North Meacham Road
Schaumburg, IL 60196

American Association for Laboratory Animal Science
70 Timber Lake Creek Drive, Suite 5
Cordova, TN 38018

Veterinary Medical College Application Service
http://aavmc.org

World-Wide Web Virtual Library: Veterinary Medicine (Biosciences)
http:ss.niah.affrc.go.jp/NIAH/mirror/vetmed/vetmed.html#progs

Office of the Associate Dean
College of Veterinary Medicine
P.O. Box 1071       :
University of Tennessee 
Knoxville, TN 37901-1071
(423) 974-7263
1998 Statistics

  • # Applicants: 584
  • # Available Slots: 68


XVII. Physician's Assistant

(PA), health care professional who provides patient services ranging from taking medical histories and doing physical examinations to performing minor surgical procedures.  Physician's assistants work under the supervision of a physician, who can be on or off site. PAs receive two years of postgraduate training and pass a national certifying exam.  They are licensed by the states. Many health care analysts believe that physician's assistants, who typically deliver quality routine health care less expensively than doctors, could be an important part of the American health care system, as they are in Canada and some European countries.

 

The American Academy of Family Physicians, the American Academy of Pediatrics, the American Academy of Physician Assistants, the American College of Physicians - American Society of Internal Medicine, the American College of Surgeons, the American Medical Association, and the Association of Physician Assistant Programs cooperate with the ARC-PA to establish, maintain, and promote appropriate standards of quality for entry level education of physician assistants (PAs) and to provide recognition for educational programs that meet the minimum requirements outlined in these Standards. These Standards are to be used for the development, evaluation, and self-analysis of physician assistant programs.

 

Physician assistants are academically and clinically prepared to provide health care services with the direction and responsible supervision of a doctor of medicine or osteopathy. The physician-PA team relationship is fundamental to the PA profession and enhances the delivery of high quality health care. Within the physician-PA relationship, PAs make clinical decisions and provide a broad range of diagnostic, therapeutic, preventive, and health maintenance services. The clinical role of PAs includes primary and specialty care in medical and surgical practice settings. PA practice is centered on patient care and may include educational, research, and administrative activities.

 

The role of the PA demands intelligence, sound judgment, intellectual honesty, appropriate interpersonal skills, and the capacity to react to emergencies in a calm and reasoned manner. An attitude of respect for self and others, adherence to the concepts of privilege and confidentiality in communicating with patients, and a commitment to the patient’s welfare are essential attributes of the graduate PA. The professional curriculum for PA education includes basic medical, behavioral, and social sciences;

introduction to clinical medicine and patient assessment; supervised clinical practice; and health policy and professional practice issues.

 

Here are the entrance requirements for the CBU Physician Assistant Program:

 

Christian Brothers University

Application Requirements for Master of Science in Physician Assistant Studies*

 

Those interested in the program should complete the following before applying to CBU’s Physician Assistant Program:

 

CASPA application.

 

The PA Program application completed and application fee received.

 

Completion of a baccalaureate degree from a regionally accredited college or university in the United States.

 

Official transcripts from all universities attended. Original transcripts will be sent to CASPA and our program for review.

 

Submit three letters of recommendation, one must be from a health care professional such as a Physician, Physician Assistant or Nurse Practitioner.

 

Completion of all of the pre-requisite course work with a cumulative GPA of 3.0 on a 4.0 scale.

 

Completion of the Graduate Record Exam (GRE). Applicants who already hold a prior advanced graduate degree are exempt from taking the GRE exam.

 

 

Course

Semester Hours

General Biology

8

General Chemistry

8

Organic Chemistry

8

Anatomy and Physiology

8

Microbiology

4

General Psychology

3

Genetics

3

calculus, statistics, or other advanced math

3

 

Text Box:

 

 

*Please note:  Christian Brothers University has applied for provisional accreditation from the Accreditation Review Commission on Education for the Physician Assistant (ARC-PA). In order to offer the program beginning Spring 2012 ARC-PA must grant provisional accreditation.

 

Today’s healthcare environment, while filled with many rewards, can be challenging on both a professional and personal level. In order to maximize your success both as a Physician Assistant and as a CBU Physician Assistant Studies student we believe that prior experience in healthcare and/or shadowing a healthcare provider, preferably a Physician Assistant, will provide the student with an increased understanding of today’s complicated healthcare environment and the fulfillment of providing this care.

 

While prior clinical experience is not a requirement for admission, evidence of such experience is strongly felt to not only be indicative of the applicant’s desire and commitment to serve as a health care provider, but also as a foundation in which the student can expand their knowledge and abilities as a medical professional.

 

We prefer this experience to be completed while observing or shadowing a physician assistant as this will allow the individual to acquire specific insights into the role of the physician assistant and will provide information that will allow the individual to fully commit to this rewarding yet demanding profession.

 

No Advanced placement is possible.

 

No prerequisites older than 5 years will be accepted unless you have been employed full time in the health care field since completion of those prerequisites.

 

No Physician Assistant credits from another institution may be transferred into the didactic or clinical years.

 

No online courses for the chemistry or biology disciplines will meet the program's prerequisite requirements.

 

Other programs in Tennessee:

 

 

Prerequisites

Course title

 

What we call those courses at CBU

# of semester hours required at Trevecca Nazarene University in Nashville

# of semester hours required at DeBusk College of Osteopathic Medicine, Harrogate, TN

# of semester hours required at Bethel University, McKenzie, TN

General Biology

 

BIOL 111 & 112, Lecture & Lab

 

0

 

8

 

8

Human Anatomy & Physiology

 

BIOL 217 & 218, Lecture and Lab*

 

8

 

8

 

8

General Chemistry

 

CHEM 113 & 114, Lecture & Lab

 

 

8

 

 

8

 

8

Biochemistry or Organic Chemistry

CHEM 211 & 212, Lecture and Lab

 

 

0

 

 

4-5

 

Recommended, not required

Medical Terminology

 

 

0

(one semester)

 

0

General Psychology

 

PSYC 105

3

3

3

Microbiology

 

BIOL 321**

4

4

4

Human Growth and Development

 

PSYC 218

 

3

 

0

 

0

Psychology elective

PSYC prefix

0

3

0

Mathematics (college algebra or higher)

MATH 103 or 106 or 117 or 131

 

 

0

 

 

3

 

 

-----

Genetics

------

-------

------

4

Cell biology

BIOL 421

------

------

Recommended

Immunology

BIOL 415

------

------

Recommended

Pharmacology

BIOL 367

------

------

Recommended

Biochemistry

CHEM 312

-------

See prerequisite for either organic or biochemistry

Recommended

Introductory statistics

MATH 121 or MATH 201 or STAT 221

------

------

Recommended

*BIOL 111 & 112, Lecture and Lab are prerequisites

**CHEM 211 & 212, Lecture and Lab are prerequisites

 

Contact information

 

DeBusk College of Osteopathic Medicine Physician Assistant Program
LMU-DCOM PHYSICIAN ASSISTANT PROGRAM
OFFICE OF ADMISSIONS AND STUDENT ADVANCEMENT
6965 CUMBERLAND GAP PARKWAY
HARROGATE, TN 37752

Internet:  http://www.lmunet.edu/DCOM/pa/index.htm

 

Trevecca Nazarene University
333 Murfreesboro Road Nashville, TN 37210
1-615-248-1200

Internet:  http://www.trevecca.edu/pa

 

For more information:

Association of Physician Assistant Programs

950 N. Washington Street

Alexandria, VA 22314-1552

703/548-5538

 

Two notes about the differences between Nurse Practitioners (NP) and Physician Assistants

1) An excerpt from an e-note sent by Dr. Elaine Cusker, PhD., Assistant Dean for Student Affairs, School of Nursing, University at Buffalo, NY) to the HLTHPROF listserv in March, 2003:

Nurse Practitioners and nursing in general approach health care from a different philosophical view than medicine. The focus is on patient care, wellness, health promotion and education, and disease prevention.

Secondly, most Nurse Practitioners exercise a high degree of independence in their practice including the ability in many areas to have their own practice. We have examples of graduates who have developed companies offering very creative health care delivery services as well as some who are the sole provider of health care for isolated or very needy populations.
ecusker@buffalo.edu
http://nursing.buffalo.edu

2. From an e-note sent by James R. Fry, MS, PA-C, Academic Coordinator, Physician Assistant Program, Marietta College, to the HLTHPROF listserv in February, 2003:

This question comes up occasionally. The article referred to was a comparison between the schooling of both professions. Perhaps that could be reprinted in the upcoming issue of the Advisor.

As far as the job is concerned, PAs and NPs work in very similar roles. In most states NPs can practice independently but may have some restrictions if they want to prescribe medications or they may be required to work under strict protocol lists. PAs prefer the dependant role since under state law we are restricted in our practice to the limits of our supervising physician not to a protocol list. 47 states allow PAs prescriptive privileges. I am not sure how many states allow NPs to prescribe but it hasn't been universal.

The biggest difference is in the training. PAs are training under the medical model very similar to medical school. They can enter the profession without any prior medical experience or education. PA programs graduate students with Associate, Bachelor or Master degrees, although the move is toward the Master's degree. NPs are advance

practice nurses and must have a BSN before they can enter the profession. Their training is based on the fact that they have prior medical schooling and tends to have a concentration of nursing theory involved. They are awarded a Master's degree. You will find some NPs who are certificate holders but I believe that all of those programs have converted to a degree. They also can be limited in their practice setting as NPs specialize in particular areas, pediatrics, adult medicine, geriatrics, OB/GYN, etc. This can limit their ability to move in the market. PAs are trained as generalist and are limited by their interest in specific fields. Since our scope of practice is regulated by that of the supervising physician we generally change specialties with a fair amount of ease, depending on the market.

I would not agree that there is a concern about too many mid-level providers. The market has seemed to remain steady and absorb new graduates. There has been a slowing of PA schools in the last couple of years. I am involved at the national level in the American Academy of Physician Assistants. We have looked at this issue many times and feel that there is a lot of room for growth. Besides the profession has been around long enough that some of us want to retire!!

Long winded but hopefully helpful.

 James R. Fry, MS, PA-C
Academic Coordinator
Physician Assistant Program
Marietta College
215 Fifth Street
Marietta, OH 45750

740-376-4952
740-376-4951 (Fax)

Check out our program information at:
http://mcnet.marietta.edu/~paprog/  

 

Also, a note regarding the distinction between PA's and MD's, also from James Fry:

I think this is the first time that I have heard this specific question. Actually the training will be very similar since a PA curriculum is based on the medicine model.

The major difference will be in the length of schooling. The average PA school is 25 months, year round. Med school certainly is 4 years plus inter