Caduceus Newsletter:

Summer 2005.02 July, 2005

 

 

1. Applicants to Washington University School of Medicine (St. Louis, MO) can access their web site and check the status of their application.
2. Received this month
3. TEST REVEALS GENDER EARLY IN PREGNANCY: from the June 27, 2005 issue of Science in the News, a daily science digest from Sigma Xi.
4. Dr. Mzungu Lungu (AKA Manny Patel) and his account of volunteer work in Uganda. 

 1. Applicants to Washington University School of Medicine (St. Louis, MO) can access their web site and check the status of their application.

 Information for applicants including application status can be found at http://medinfo.wustl.edu/admissions .

 

2. Received this month

University of Alabama at Birmingham School of Medicine MD/PhD Program

        Brochures describing the Medical Scientist Program

Associated American Dental Schools Application Service (AADSAS)

        Information brochures for applicants

 

3. TEST REVEALS GENDER EARLY IN PREGNANCY: from the June 27, 2005 issue of Science in the News, a daily science digest from Sigma Xi.

 

 

First came the home pregnancy test. Now here comes the home gender test.

 

A new blood test being marketed to American women offers them the chance to

find out whether they are having a boy or a girl almost as soon as they

realize they are pregnant, as early as five weeks along.

 

Just two or three days after mailing the test overnight to a Lowell lab for

processing, a pregnant woman can know what color to paint the nursery -- or

even decide whether to get an abortion if she wants a child of the opposite

sex, a prospect that worries ethicists.

http://tinyurl.com/9tyb2

 

 

4. Dr. Mzungu Lungu (AKA Manny Patel) and his account of volunteer work in Uganda

Hey guys,

Well I first of all want to apologize for the delay in this email. You would have to understand that we live in a village named Hope North, located in Bweyale, a trading post in the district of Masindi, about 3 hours north of Kampala

 

We have no electricity and no internet so it is impossible for me to contact you.  (Ed. Note: There are Internet cafes in Kampala.) However life in the camp is awesome. I am staying in a modified refugee camp that is a self-sustainable camp.  The village is made up of a group of Acholi people that are being displaced from their homes by the rebel armies in the north.  As far as the camp goes , I have become the doctor in the group. I have treated many ailments for example, malaria, typhoid, and many other bruises and scrapes.  I am also teaching at the school located in the camp.  I teach biology, chemistry, and some physics.  They also want me to coach the futbol team but since I have never played I really cant.  The place is awesome though, and i have learned so much about these people.  Many of the students here are orphans and learning about their experiences on how their parents and siblings were killed is rather frightful.  The students come from all different ages and all of them go to school. Some of them are older than me so when I teach the classes it seems real weird.  Life at the camp is a bit hard.  For instances we have to cook for ourselves and also do our own laundry.  Try doing your own laundry just using your hands.  We have to also iron our clothes with a coal iron so that we kill some eggs that were laid on our clothing by some mango flies.  I hope that everything is going well back home and hope to hear from you soon...

 

Manny

Dr. Stan Eisen, Director
Preprofessional Health Programs
Biology Department
Christian Brothers University

650 East Parkway South
Memphis, TN 38104

E-mail: seisen@cbu.edu
http://www.cbu.edu/~seisen/
Caduceus Newsletter Archives: http://www.cbu.edu/~seisen/Caduceus.html