Christian Brothers University

www.cbu.edu

Caduceus Newsletter: Summer 2014.03 , August  

CaduceusDNAHelixLarger

Image from the U.S. Department of Energy Genome Program web site:   http://genomics.energy.gov  

Dr. Stan Eisen, Director
Preprofessional Health Programs
Christian Brothers University

650 East Parkway South
Memphis, TN  38104

Home page:
http://facstaff.cbu.edu/~seisen/ 

Caduceus Newsletter Archives:
http://facstaff.cbu.edu/~seisen/Caduceus.html

 

An inconvenient truth, ladies and gentlemen:

 

Classes begin

 

 

Table of Contents:

 

1.   The Trinity School of Medicine, located in the Ratho Mill district of Kingstown, the capital of St. Vincent and the Grenadines, is accepting applications for the September 2014 incoming class with a limited number of seats currently available. 
2.  PharmCAS has launched for the 2014-2015 application cycle. 
3.  Smell and Eye Tests May Permit Early Detection of Alzheimer’s.  Reprinted with permission from Genetic Engineering and Biotechnology News, Liebert Publishing.  
4.  The Lincoln Memorial University – DeBusk College of Osteopathic Medicine will be hosting its Fall 2014 Osteopathic Medicine Awareness Conference & Open House on Saturday, September 20.   
5.  South Carolina College of Pharmacy Pre-Pharmacy Advisor Newsletter, Fall 2014. 

 

1.   The Trinity School of Medicine, located in the Ratho Mill district of Kingstown, the capital of St. Vincent and the Grenadines, is accepting applications for the September 2014 incoming class with a limited number of seats currently available. 

1 in 4 Physicians in the U.S and Canada are International Medical Graduates

Stan,

Re-Apply and Wait or Consider Alternate MD Routes?
The U.S. and Canadian Medical School Application cycle for the 2014 Fall enrollment is closed but that doesn't mean there aren't options for beginning an MD program this year keeping you on track to apply for a Residency position in the 2018 Match. 

What is your ultimate goal? If it's to gain admission to a U.S. or Canadian Medical School then do your homework and formulate a strategy to address your areas of weakness understanding that to execute your plan properly may require anywhere from one to three years. If your real goal is to become a Physician, then consider an alternate path to earning your MD, one that does not greatly extend your timeline or tack on debt from additional education costs like post bacc or Masters programs.  

Trinity is accepting applications for the September 2014 incoming class with a limited number of seats currently available. Complete Trinity's Application for Admission or submit an existing AMCAS, OMSAS, TMDSAS or AACOMAS application report, the Application Process will be expedited within a few short weeks. 

Compare Trinity SOM timeline to the U.S. and Canada

   

WHY CONSIDER TRINITY?

First-term clinical experience
220-bed hospital affiliation
Formal and comprehensive
USMLE Step 1 preparation

Trinity SOM Students in Residency

Share the news...

Share on Facebook Share on LinkedIn Share on Twitter Share on Google+ Share on Email

http://www.trinityschoolofmedicine.org/e-mail/images/spacer.gifhttp://www.trinityschoolofmedicine.org/images/tsom_footer.jpg

Trinity School of Medicine   12600 Deerfield Parkway, Suite 100    Alpharetta,  GA   30004   United States

You received this email because you are subscribed to Marketing Information from Trinity School of Medicine.

Update your email preferences to choose the types of emails you receive.

 Unsubscribe from all future emails 

Powered by HubSpot

 

2.  PharmCAS has launched for the 2014-2015 application cycle. 

Advisors,

 

Just a note to let you know that PharmCAS has launched for the 2014-2015 application cycle.  This year, we have a new and improved website, and we would encourage you to take a look at the new site at www.pharmcas.org .  We are especially excited about the new School Directory and search ability of the new site.  Also new for 2015, we have included graduate programs in the pharmaceutical sciences that reside in our member schools and colleges of pharmacy in PharmCAS, which allows applicants to apply to PharmD and/or Masters/PhD programs.

 

We encourage each of you to create a test application within PharmCAS, and request that you please use Test in your name (e.g. JenniferTest AdamsTest) so that we can identify your test application.  Please do not submit your application (or enter any credit card info!).

 

Please join us in welcoming our new PharmCAS participating programs:

 

PharmD

 

           West Coast University

           University of North Texas

           Cedarville University

           Northeastern University

           Sullivan University

           California Health Sciences University

           Keck Graduate Institute

           Xavier University

           Texas Southern University

           Chapman University

 

 

Graduate Programs

 

           Albany College of Pharmacy and Health Sciences, Health Outcome Research

           Albany College of Pharmacy and Health Sciences, Molecular Biosciences

           Albany College of Pharmacy and Health Sciences, Pharmaceutical Sciences

           Nova Southeastern University, Regulatory Affairs

           University of Arizona, Pharmaceutical Sciences

           University of Arizona, Pharmaceutical Sciences

           University of Arizona, Pharmacology and Toxicology

           University of Pittsburgh, MS Pharmaceutical Sciences

           University of Pittsburgh, PhD Pharmaceutical Sciences

           West Virginia University, Health Outcome Research

 

The PharmCAS 2015 application fee is $150 for the first designation and $55 for each additional designation.  A Fee Waiver Assistance Program is available to students with financial need and applications are taken on a first come first serve basis.  For more information visit http://www.pharmcas.org/preparing-to-apply/what-youll-need-to-apply/application-payment/

 

Please see the attached presentation for updates to the cycle and preliminary statistics about the 2014 accepted class as well as information about PCAT and PCAT Prep Programs.  Feel free to share the presentation with your students.

 

PharmCAS is looking forward to another great application cycle!

 

Thanks!

Jen

 

Jennifer Athay Adams, Pharm.D.

Senior Director of Strategic Academic Partnerships

American Association of Colleges of Pharmacy

1727 King Street, Floor 2

Alexandria, VA 22314

Phone: 703-739-2330 ext. 1024

Cell: 703-801-9609

Fax: 703-836-8982

www.aacp.org

 

3.  Smell and Eye Tests May Permit Early Detection of Alzheimer’s.  Reprinted with permission from Genetic Engineering and Biotechnology News, Liebert Publishing.  

 

GEN News Highlights

Jul 14, 2014

Smell and Eye Tests May Permit Early Detection of Alzheimer's

 

Although the medical community insists that it needs ways to detect Alzheimer’s disease earlier, it still struggles with diagnostic techniques that are not only invasive, but expensive as well. Even worse, these techniques—which involve lumbar punctures or PET scans—are not readily available at many locations. Without early detection methods that are both easily applied and readily available, researchers will continue to have difficulty moving treatment and prevention trials earlier in the course of the disease. In addition, patients will be slow to take advantage of whatever preventative measures become available.

The barriers to early detection, however, may soon become less daunting now that researchers have found new ways to assess people for Alzheimer’s disease. At the Alzheimer’s Association International Conference 2014 in Copenhagen, four studies were presented that point to new detection techniques. These techniques promise not only convenience, but also early detection of Alzheimer’s.

In two of the studies, the decreased ability to identify odors was significantly associated with loss of brain cell function and progression to Alzheimer’s disease. In two other studies, the level of beta-amyloid detected in the eye (a) was significantly correlated with the burden of beta-amyloid in the brain and (b) allowed researchers to accurately identify the people with Alzheimer’s in the studies.

The studies were as follows:

    • Olfactory identification and Alzheimer's disease biomarkers in clinically normal elderly (presented by researchers representing Harvard Medical School). In a study population of 215 clinically normal elderly individuals, a smaller hippocampus and a thinner entorhinal cortex were associated with worse smell identification and worse memory. The scientists also found that, in a subgroup of study participants with elevated levels of amyloid in their brain, greater brain cell death, as indicated by a thinner entorhinal cortex, was significantly associated with worse olfactory function—after adjusting for variables including age, gender, and an estimate of cognitive reserve.
    • Olfactory identification deficits predict the transition from MCI to AD in a multi-ethnic community sample (presented by researchers representing Columbia University). In 757 subjects who were followed in this study, lower odor identification scores on UPSIT were significantly associated with the transition to dementia and Alzheimer's disease, after controlling for demographic, cognitive, and functional measures, language of administration, and apolipoprotein E genotype. For each point lower that a person scored on the UPSIT, the risk of Alzheimer's increased by about 10%. Further, lower baseline UPSIT scores, but not measures of verbal memory, were significantly associated with cognitive decline in participants without baseline cognitive impairment.
    • Retinal amyloid fluorescence imaging predicts cerebral amyloid burden and Alzheimer's disease (presented by researchers representing the Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organization, or CSIRO). This group reported preliminary results of a study of volunteers who took a proprietary supplement containing curcumin, which binds to beta-amyloid with high affinity and has fluorescent properties that allow amyloid plaques to be detected in the eye using a novel system from NeuroVision Imaging, and a technique called retinal amyloid imaging (RAI). Volunteers also underwent brain amyloid PET imaging to correlate the retina and brain amyloid accumulation. An abstract prepared by the scientists for AAIC 2014 gives the results for 40 participants out of 200 total in the study. Preliminary results suggest that amyloid levels detected in the retina were significantly correlated with brain amyloid levels as shown by PET imaging. The retinal amyloid test also differentiated between Alzheimer's and non-Alzheimer's subjects with 100% sensitivity and 80.6% specificity.
    • Detection of ligand bound to beta amyloid in the lenses of human eyes (presented by researchers representing Cognoptix). This group reported the results of a study of a fluorescent ligand eye scanning (FLES) system that detects beta-amyloid in the lens of the eye using a topically applied ointment that binds to amyloid and a laser scanner. The researchers studied 20 people with probable Alzheimer’s disease, including mild cases, and 20 age-matched healthy volunteers. The ointment was applied to the inside of participants’ lower eyelids the day before measurement. Laser scanning detected beta-amyloid in the eye by the presence of a specific fluorescent signature; brain amyloid positron emission tomography (PET) scanning was performed on all participants to estimate amyloid plaque density in the brain. Using results from the fluorescent imaging, researchers were able to differentiate people with Alzheimer’s from healthy controls with high sensitivity (85%) and specificity (95%). In addition, amyloid levels based on the eye lens test correlated significantly with results obtained through PET brain imaging.

“In the face of the growing worldwide Alzheimer’s disease epidemic, there is a pressing need for simple, less invasive diagnostic tests that will identify the risk of Alzheimer's much earlier in the disease process," said Heather Snyder, Ph.D., Alzheimer’s Association director of Medical and Scientific Operations. “This is especially true as Alzheimer’s researchers move treatment and prevention trials earlier in the course of the disease.”

“More research is needed in the very promising area of Alzheimer’s biomarkers because early detection is essential for early intervention and prevention, when new treatments become available,” Dr. Snyder added. “For now, these four studies reported at AAIC point to possible methods of early detection in a research setting to choose study populations for clinical trials of Alzheimer's treatments and preventions.”

 

 

4.  The Lincoln Memorial University DeBusk College of Osteopathic Medicine will be hosting its Fall 2014 Osteopathic Medicine Awareness Conference & Open House on Saturday, September 20.   

I hope this e-mail finds you well and I hope that your summer has been enjoyable so far. On behalf of everyone at Lincoln Memorial University – DeBusk College of Osteopathic Medicine, I am happy to share with you below, the invitation to our Fall 2014 Osteopathic Medicine Awareness Conference & Open House, scheduled for Saturday, September 20.  You may see the event flier at the bottom of the page.  The event is open to interested prospective students as well as pre-medical advisors and anyone interested in learning more about our DO program and about osteopathic medicine in general. Please register by using the following link: http://www.lmunet.edu/dcom/omac_registration.shtml. If you click on the link, you will be re-directed to the registration page on our website. Please feel free to forward this e-mail to anyone you know who may be interested in attending.

 

I hope you will be able to join us and please feel free to bring family, friends or colleagues with you!

 

Sincerely,

Daniel Goodpaster, M.S

Lincoln Memorial University

DeBusk College of Osteopathic Medicine Admissions Recruiter

daniel.goodpaster@lmunet.edu

O: 423.869.6091  

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


5.  South Carolina College of Pharmacy (Columbia, SC) Pre-Pharmacy Advisor Newsletter, Fall 2014. 

 

 

Dr. Stan Eisen, Director
Preprofessional Health Programs
Biology Department
Christian Brothers University

650 East Parkway South
Memphis, TN 38104

E-mail: seisen@cbu.edu
http://www.cbu.edu/~seisen/
Caduceus Newsletter Archives: http://www.cbu.edu/~seisen/Caduceus.html