Christian Brothers University

www.cbu.edu

Caduceus Newsletter: Summer 2014.01, June 2014  

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Image from the U.S. Department of Energy Genome Program web site:   http://genomics.energy.gov  

Dr. Stan Eisen, Director
Preprofessional Health Programs
Christian Brothers University

650 East Parkway South
Memphis, TN  38104

Home page:
http://facstaff.cbu.edu/~seisen/ 

Caduceus Newsletter Archives:
http://facstaff.cbu.edu/~seisen/Caduceus.html

 

Table of Contents:

 

1.   The West Virginia School of Osteopathic Medicine is sponsoring a Summer Open House on Friday, June 20, 2014.  
2.  ===AAMC STAT===, News from the Association of American Medical Colleges, May 5, 2014.  
3.  Church Health Center’s May 2014 e-newsletter:  Church Health Center's night of theater at Playhouse on the Square is back with a benefit performance of Hairspray on Friday, June 27. 
4.  From yahoo.com News:  Ways Medical School Hopefuls Can Cope After a Rejection.
 
5.  ===AAMC STAT===, News from the Association of American Medical Colleges, June 16, 2014 edition. 

6.  Marginalia:  It’s very important to advise your patients to remain active in retirement.  

 

1.   The West Virginia School of Osteopathic Medicine is sponsoring a Summer Open House on Friday, June 20, 2014.  

 

2.  ===AAMC STAT===, News from the Association of American Medical Colleges, May 5, 2014.  

http://www.aamc.org/em/lyris/images/stat.jpg

News from the Association of American Medical Colleges

May 5, 2014

• AAMC Announces New MCAT2015 Resources and Score Scale
• IPPS Rule Opens Door for Discussion on “Two-Midnights” Rule
• Senate Hearing Focuses on Role of Federal Investment in Innovation
• The AAMC is Moving to Its New Headquarters
• NRMP Results of 2014 Match Available
• ABIM Survey Explores Physician Attitudes on Overuse of Health Care Services
• On the Move



AAMC Announces New MCAT2015 Resources and Score Scale  

The AAMC recently announced new resources to help aspiring medical students prepare for the revised MCAT® exam, which is part of a broader effort by the AAMC and the nation’s medical schools to improve the admissions process and support holistic review of applicants. Because the exam will test new academic competencies, scores will be reported on a different scale than the current exam. The new score scale emphasizes the center of the score range—rather than the top third—because students with scores at the center of the scale have historically performed well in medical school. It is designed to draw attention to applicants who might otherwise be overlooked and supports the holistic review of medical school applicants. The new resources include a free interactive tool to help students learn about the content on the new exam and the Official Guide to the MCAT® Exam (MCAT2015). To learn more, visit www.aamc/mcat2015.


IPPS Rule Opens Door for Discussion on “Two-Midnights” Rule

The Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) is requesting feedback on alternative payment approaches under the Medicare program for short hospital stays or those lasting “two midnights,” according to the fiscal year 2015 Inpatient Prospective Payment (IPPS) rule released last week. The agency is asking for comments on how the short-stay payment methodology should be designed, how short stays should be defined, and what the appropriate payment should be for these stays, presenting an opportunity to suggest a new way for CMS to reimburse hospitals for stays of less than two midnights instead of requiring these services be billed as an outpatient visit. Updates to the payment policies under the proposed rule would decrease IPPS operating payments for all hospitals by about $864 million (0.8 percent reduction). CMS estimates the impact of the changes to teaching hospitals would reduce payments by 1.3 percent. For full analysis of the proposed rule, visit www.aamc.org/advocacy/washhigh


Senate Hearing Focuses on Role of Federal Investment in Innovation

In a statement submitted to the full Senate Committee on Appropriations, the AAMC urged Congress to find a bipartisan solution to restore stable and predictable funding to the National Institutes of Health (NIH) for medical research. The committee’s hearing last week, Driving Innovation through Federal Investments, addressed concerns the nation is falling behind in scientific innovation and featured leaders of U.S. science agencies, including NIH Director Francis S. Collins, M.D., Ph.D. The statement highlighted interdisciplinary initiatives on the cusp of combining novel breakthroughs in the way genomic research is conducted with the development of a comprehensive electronic health record system, and cites the detrimental effect reduced NIH funding has had on a new generation of scientists. The association also signed on to testimony submitted by 50 business, higher education, scientific, and patient organizations.


The AAMC is Moving to Its New Headquarters

On May 19, the AAMC will complete the move to its new headquarters in the Mount Vernon Triangle neighborhood of Washington, D.C. The innovative new building will feature a Learning Center, which will host meetings with AAMC constituents and other learning opportunities throughout the year. The association’s new address will be 655 K Street, NW, Suite 100, Washington, DC, 20001-2399.


NRMP Results of 2014 Match Available 

The National Resident Matching Program® (NRMP) has released its full report on the 2014 Match results. While the 96 percent position fill rate made this year’s Match one of the most successful, 412 U.S. medical school seniors still do not have a residency position. This is fewer than the 528 unmatched students last year. The country still faces a shortage of more than 90,000 physicians across specialties by 2020. Growth in family and internal medicine positions contributed to more than half of the increase in the total number of positions offered this year, according to the report.


ABIM Survey Explores Physician Attitudes on Overuse of Health Care Services

Physicians are concerned about the use of unnecessary tests and medical procedures but still report that the average physician orders these at least once a week, according to survey results released by the ABIM Foundation. Nearly three out of four physicians expressed these attitudes on both issues. More than half of physicians think they are in the best position to address the problem and have ultimate responsibility for making sure patients avoid unnecessary care, according to the survey.


On the Move 

David S. Hefner will step down as CEO of Regents Medical Center and Medical Associates and executive vice president of clinical affairs for Georgia Regents University to pursue other opportunities. He will continue to work in a strategic capacity on behalf of GRHealth. Peter F. Buckley, dean of the Medical College of Georgia at Georgia Regents University, will serve in the interim until a permanent replacement is found.

Elizabeth "Liz" Concordia has been appointed president and CEO of the University of Colorado Health System, effective Sept. 2. Concordia currently serves as executive vice president of the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center (UPMC) and president of UPMC's Hospital and Community Services Division. Bill Neff, M.D., chief medical officer, has served in the interim over the last eight months.


 

 

3.  Church Health Center’s May 2014 e-newsletter:  Church Health Center's night of theater at Playhouse on the Square is back with a benefit performance of Hairspray on Friday, June 27. 

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Walking As One was a HUGE success. Thanks to everyone who showed up to better the community through exercise and fellowship!  More than 1,400 people attended and walked with us, and thanks to some very generous anonymous donors who donated $20 per participant, we raised more than $65,000!

 

Thanks again to each and every one of you who came out! Click here to see pictures from the event.

 

 

First Tennessee Bank 150 Days of Giving - We won! 

 

Thanks to all who voted for us and of course First Tennessee Bank for their continued support! You can still vote for other great organizations who do good work for the city!

 

Hairspray - Save the Date!

Friday, June 27

Church Health Center's night of theater at Playhouse on the Square is back with a benefit performance of Hairspray on Friday, June 27. For more information, contact Jennie Dickerson at 901-701-2097 or dickersonj@churchhealthcenter.org.

 

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1210 Peabody Ave. | Memphis| 901-272-7170
churchhealthcenter.org

 

4.  From yahoo.com News:  Ways Medical School Hopefuls Can Cope After a Rejection. 

Here’s the URL:  http://news.yahoo.com/ways-medical-school-hopefuls-cope-rejection-133000438.html

 

By Sylvia Morris, M.D.

If you did not get into medical school on the first try, it's not the end of the world.

Receiving thin envelopes or impersonal rejection emails from medical school admissions offices is tough to take, especially after investing an incredible amount of energy into the application process.

Still, hold your head up high. Think about all those premed students who started undergraduate chemistry with you and did not stick to the program, much less apply to medical school. You had a goal and followed through on a plan. That speaks to resilience and perseverance.

But if you were not admitted, you now must pivot, and many options are at hand. Don't think of this as plan B but as an opportunity to grow and add to the diversity of your experiences that will serve you in many ways in the future.

[Understand the top reasons medical school applications are rejected.]

This experience is an outstanding learning opportunity. Review your reasons for going to medical school. Evaluate your feelings to determine if you wish to endure another application season and both the mental and financial expense of reapplying to medical school.

If you determine you still want to go, then consider a postbaccalaureate program that combines a graduate degree and preparation for reapplying to medical school.

Seek the counsel of a trusted adviser and have a frank discussion about your future. Write down what you enjoy, what you are good at and where you see yourself going. It's good to start by listing undergraduate experiences that really resonated with you and brought you joy.

Consider pursuing a graduate school program that relates to your undergraduate degree. Science majors often cringe at the thought of a graduate science degree, but there are other options including public health andbusiness

 school

.

Think about committing to a few years of service with organizations such as Teach for America, the Peace Corps or AmeriCorps. Public service, whether abroad or in the U.S., spawns future opportunities by establishing lifetime connections and forges personal growth in a positive learning environment.

[Take steps to plan a gap year before medical school.]

Another option is entering the business world via the consulting, biotechnology or pharmaceutical industries. Tapping into volunteer or internship experiences during college can also yield potential job opportunities. There's nothing like a little cash and real-world experience to help bring clarity to a life plan.

If you are a year out from graduation, this provides the benefit and luxury of time before completing your bachelor's degree. However, if you are finishing your undergraduate degree in the coming weeks, all is not lost. Merely redirect your energy.

[Learn ways to get off a medical school waitlist.]

Do not be distracted by the possibility of another medical school application process and remain focused on completing the last few classes to secure your degree. Enjoy graduation and be proud. You still have a noteworthy achievement to celebrate.

When friends, family and classmates ask what your plans are after graduation, tell them as much or as little as you want -- try saying, "I'm weighing my options" and deliver it with a broad smile.

Whether graduate school, service or the workforce is in your immediate future, rest assured you will make the right decision by listening to your gut through stillness, trust and patience.

Sylvia E. Morris received her M.D. from Georgetown University School of Medicine and her Master's in Public Health from Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. She is an assistant professor at Emory University School of Medicine and a community health advocate. Find her on Facebook and follow her on Twitter.

 

5.  ===AAMC STAT===, News from the Association of American Medical Colleges, June 16, 2014 edition. 

http://www.aamc.org/em/lyris/images/stat.jpg

News from the Association of American Medical Colleges

June 16, 2014

• New Guidelines to Prepare Medical Students for Residency Training and Improve Patient Safety
• Annual AAMC/SACME Harrison Survey Report Now Available

• AAMC Council of Deans Fellowship Program Names 2014–2015 Fellows

• Upcoming Webinar Examines Competency-Based Medical Education

• Minority Faculty Career Development Seminar Open for Registration

• On the Move



New Guidelines to Prepare Medical Students for Residency Training and Improve Patient Safety

A new set of
guidelines from the AAMC will help bridge the gap between patient care activities that new physicians should be able to perform on day one of residency training, and those they feel ready to perform without direct supervision. With the goal of improving patient care and safety, the guidelines are the first formal outline of the activities and requisite competencies and behaviors that graduating medical students should be able to perform entering residency. Working with a group of graduate medical education experts, the AAMC developed the Core Entrustable Professional Activities (EPAs) for Entering Residency, which includes 13 activities that all medical students should be able to perform, regardless of specialty, to standardize the expectations for both learners and teachers and better prepare students for their roles as clinicians. The core EPAs—activities such as gathering a patient history, prioritizing differential diagnoses, and recommending tests—were chosen as the framework for the guide because they offer a promising approach for assessing the real-world impact of a resident’s education on patient care.


Annual AAMC/SACME Harrison Survey Report Now Available

The sixth annual
AAMC/SACME Harrison Survey report
outlines strengths of academic continuing medical education (CME) units—including their potential to assist academic medical centers (AMCs) achieve missions and improve patient care—and summarizes the challenges for CME units, providing six possible strategic improvement goals. Over a six-year period, the CME community has seen an increased focus on faculty development, more linkages with programs such as quality improvement and patient safety, greater use of effective educational methods, and more fiscal stability, according to the report. In 2013, the survey was redesigned to better understand the placement and alignment of the CME unit within AMCs, providing a better picture of its impact on both the internal and external audience and on the community it serves.


AAMC Council of Deans Fellowship Program Names 2014–2015 Fellows

The AAMC has named Allison Brashear, M.D., M.B.A., Wake Forest School of Medicine; Robert S.D. Higgins, M.D., MSHA, The Ohio State University College of Medicine; and D. Brent Polk, M.D., Keck School of Medicine of the University of Southern California as the
2014–2015 Council of Deans (COD) Fellows. Last year, the COD resumed its fellowship program for senior faculty, including department chairs and assistant and associate deans, to enhance the development of future leaders in academic medicine. Key program components include going on campus visits with two dean mentors, being introduced to the COD’s strategic activities, participating in COD meetings and other professional development opportunities specific to deans, and completing a leadership project that addresses an important challenge at his or her institution.


Upcoming Webinar Examines Competency-Based Medical Education

The AAMC is offering another opportunity to participate in the webinar, “Competency-Based Medical Education: A Primer for the Medical Education Community,” on Thursday, June 19, from 4:00–5:30 p.m. EST. This 90-minute informational and highly-interactive webinar provides participants with the tenets of competency-based medical education and the implications for assessment of learners across the education and training continuum. To register,
click here.


Minority Faculty Career Development Seminar Open for Registration

Registration is open for the AAMC
Minority Faculty Career Development Seminar, Sept. 5–8 in Vancouver. The three-day seminar for junior faculty (senior clinical and research fellows, instructors, and assistant professors) and post-docs who aspire to leadership positions in academic medicine provides participants with real-world guidance and tools for pursuing career advancement in academic medicine, developing key professional competencies, building grant writing and communication skills, and expanding their network of colleagues and role models. Additionally, faculty who are preparing a National Institutes of Health (NIH) Career Development K or R grant proposal can apply to attend the Grant Writers Coaching Group for NIH Awards, which is offered on the first day of this seminar and includes an individual meeting with the coach, followed by biweekly virtual group meetings to facilitate ongoing review and discussion. To learn more about both programs, click here.



On the Move

Ronald W. Swinfard, M.D., announced his retirement as president and CEO of Lehigh Valley Health Network, effective July 1. Swinfard has served in the role since Nov. 2010, when he succeeded the health network's longtime president and CEO, Elliot J. Sussman, M.D
.

 

 

6.  Marginalia:  It’s very important to advise your patients to remain active in retirement. 

 

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Dr. Stan Eisen, Director
Preprofessional Health Programs
Biology Department
Christian Brothers University
650 East Parkway South
Memphis, TN 38104
E-mail: seisen@cbu.edu
http://www.cbu.edu/~seisen/
Caduceus Newsletter Archives: http://www.cbu.edu/~seisen/Caduceus.html