Christian Brothers University

www.cbu.edu

Caduceus Newsletter: Spring 2019.08, Week of February 25

CaduceusDNAHelixLarger

Image from the U.S. Department of Energy Genome Program web site:   http://genomics.energy.gov  

Dr. Stan Eisen, Director
Preprofessional Health Programs
Christian Brothers University

650 East Parkway South
Memphis, TN  38104

Home page:
http://facstaff.cbu.edu/~seisen/ 

Caduceus Newsletter Archives:
http://facstaff.cbu.edu/~seisen/Caduceus.html

Q—What happens when you offer live crickets to L’il Girl Jimmie, the bearded dragon?

 

 

To find out, please go to Marginalia.

 

Table of Contents:

1.   Campus events coming up.
2.  Register now to attend the FREE Naturopathic Medical College Virtual Fair on March 6, 2019.  
3.  Casa de Esperanza is a non-profit in Houston, Texas, which provides residential care to children birth through six who are in crisis due to abuse, neglect, or the effects of HIV.
  
4.  The University of Pennsylvania Veterinary Scientist Training Program offers a VMD-PhD combined degree.  
5.  Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine offers a summer course in Human Anatomy, June 3-June 28, 2019. 
6.  University of Colorado School of Medicine’s Wilderness Medicine Newsletter, CU In the Wild, Volume II, #2, February 2019.  
7.  The University of Massachusetts Medical School (UMMS) Combined Summer Undergraduate Research Opportunity is a non-credit, ten-week, structured research experience. The program consists of "hands-on" laboratory research with an investigator serving as a mentor, role model and advisor.
 
8.  Penn State is partnering with Project Drawdown, and recruiting 40 undergraduates to spend eight weeks this summer delving into research projects related to climate change as part of the University's newest Research Experiences for Undergraduates (REU) program. 
9.  AAMC News:  News About America’s Medical Schools and Teaching Hospitals, February 20, 2019 edition. 
10.  The unique curriculum at the Medical School for International Health (MSIH at Ben-Gurion University of the Negev, Beersheva, Israel) prepares physicians to work with diverse populations locally and globally. 
11.  Grab the Family for a Night Under the Stars at the Memphis Botanic Garden, March 1, 2019! 

12.  Marginalia:  Q—What happens when you offer live crickets to L’il Girl Jimmie, a bearded dragon? 

 

1. Campus events coming up. 

MIDTERM EXAMS!

 

2.  Register now to attend the FREE Naturopathic Medical College Virtual Fair on March 6, 2019.  

Share on Social Media: Share event on Facebook  Share event on Twitter  Share event on LinkedIn

REGISTER NOW to attend the FREE Naturopathic Medical College Virtual Fair on March 6th
Get answers to your most pressing questions from 7 Schools in one Live Event! (Review List)

Naturopathic Medical College Virtual Fair - click to go to registration page

 

 

3.  Casa de Esperanza is a non-profit in Houston, Texas, which provides residential care to children birth through six who are in crisis due to abuse, neglect, or the effects of HIV.   

Good Morning,

I am with Casa de Esperanza, a non-profit in Houston, Texas.  Casa de Esperanza provides residential care to children birth through six who are in crisis due to abuse, neglect, or the effects of HIV.  Care is provided in our neighborhood by our Hands of Hope interns.  Information about our internship may be found here:

https://www.casahope.org/hands-of-hope-internship

A link to our internship application may be found here:
https://www.casahope.org/application-part-one

I am writing with the hope that you may be able to share information about this internship with interested students in your program.  Our internship especially appeals to students who wish to complete a service internship (or gap year) before entering medical or graduate school.

Interns in our program gain valuable experience that is relevant to a number of fields and future career goals while simultaneously making a meaningful difference in the lives of a vulnerable group of children.

Thank you and please let me know if you should need more information.

Stephanie Diehl, Casa de Esperanza de los Niños, Inc.
PO Box 66581
Houston, TX 77266-6581
Main Office: 713.529.0639
Fax:713.529.9179
Stephanie@casahope.org

GAP YEAR OPPORTUNITY FOR GRADUATING SENIORS

 

hands of hope

 

What is this? This program typically lasts for one year and gives young adults the opportunity to care for children under the age of six years old at the time of placement who are currently in residential care with our agency.

 

What will I be doing? Everything necessary to properly and safely care for, advocate for and meet the daily needs of four to five children placed in your home.

 

Will I be doing this alone? The community is made up of ten homes in a gated neighborhood that have approximately four Hands of Hope House Parents in each home.

 

How will this help my future? This gives you the opportunity to earn hands on experience leaning how abuse, neglect, and the effects of HIV play a role in some of society’s most vulnerable children. You will be working directly with therapists, specialists, and social workers to meet the specific needs for each individual child.

SOCIAL WORK

                       ────

              PRE-MEDICINE

                       ────

                PSYCHOLOGY

                       ────

EDUCATION

────

SOCIOLOGY

────

HEALTH SCIENCES

────

SOCIAL JUSTICE

cASA DE ESPERANZA

P.O. BOX 66581
Houston, TX 77266

713-529-9179

www.casahope.org

Person to Contact:

Jordan Chismar

Email: jchismar@casahope.org

 

 

 

 

 

4.  The University of Pennsylvania Veterinary Scientist Training Program offers a VMD-PhD combined degree.  



Please note: the correct web address is: https://www.vet.upenn.edu/education/dual-degree-programs/vmd-phd-program



 

VMD-PhD Degree at Penn Vet. 

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Penn Vet

 

 

VMD-PhD
                                                  Combined=Degree
                                                  ProgramDear Undergraduate Research Advisor,

 

Please share the following with any students you think may be interested in VMD-PhD combined degree training.

 

Thank you!

 

Rabbits help lower cholesterol. Cats may lead to a breakthrough in the AIDS epidemic. And dogs have taught doctors new heart surgery techniques. Even lobsters help scientists understand Parkinson's disease. For over 100 years, animal research has helped wipe out such diseases as smallpox and polio while increasing the human lifespan by 28 years. Whether it's fighting epilepsy, finding a cure for Alzheimer's or making progress in brain and spinal cord trauma, the link between human health and animal health is absolutely crucial.

 

The University of Pennsylvania School of Veterinary Medicine provides an outstanding environment for the training of future veterinary scientists through our combined VMD-PhD program. It's an excellent way for you to continue your education while impacting the future of medicine ­ for humans and all species.


Who knows what today's research could do for future generations? Find out more by visiting www.PennVetPhD.org

 

To opt out of this email notification please send a return email and insert the text "Remove."

 

 

 

http://content.expresspigeon.com/image_gallery/uploaded/448/5568/banner2.jpg
 

 

 

Penn Vet

3800 Spruce Street

Philadelphia PA 19104

United States

 

5.  Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine offers a summer course in Human Anatomy, June 3-June 28, 2019. 

 

 

 

6.  University of Colorado School of Medicine’s Wilderness Medicine Newsletter, CU In the Wild, Volume II, #2, February 2019.  

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Vol II, #2
February 2019
 

CU In The Wild 
University of Colorado School of Medicine 
Wilderness Medicine Newsletter 

 

University of Colorado School of Medicine Wilderness Medicine Section News

The Wilderness Medicine Section offered its first med student Wilderness Advanced First Aid class in early February.  Eleven dedicated University of Colorado med students learned the WAFA curriculum through lectures, labs, and scenarios. They now move on to assisting in labs and scenarios in upcoming WFA and WFR classes, where they will reinforce their learning and learn facilitation and teaching skills (see attached photos). 
 
Erin Lennon, PA, who is a regular speaker for our pre-med program, has been named the 2019 Colorado Academy of PAs Physician Assistant of the Year in recognition of her work in natural disaster relief. In 2017 Erin joined teams of medical relief workers who provided aid to people in St. Thomas and Puerto Rico. The award will be presented at the CAPA 2019 Winter CME Conference in Copper Mountain in early February. 

 

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Wilderness Medicine Links

For an interesting take on the history of first aid kits click here. 
 
Hunting, horses, and hematomas: https://www.uchealth.org/today/2019/01/16/this-elk-hunter-bagged-the-ride-of-his-life/
 
Colorado avalanche fatalities: https://coloradosun.com/2019/02/18/crested-butte-avalanche-aspen-men-killed/.

 

 

 

CU Wilderness Medicine Event 

The Wilderness Section hosted a meet and greet on February 13th at Ubergrippen Indoor Climbing Gym. Around 25 people attended the event where they had the opportunity to network, free climb, and give a presentation on the current projects he or she is working on.  At the end of the event, Jamie Logan, gave a keynote presentation speaking on her many first ascents, a couple to name, Crack of Fear and Diamond of Longs Peak.   

 

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Section Helps Train Ski Patrol

Members of the Wilderness Medicine Section spent a day with the Loveland Ski Patrol, providing advanced medical training for the patrollers and learning about the patrol operations. Section personnel (attendings, residents, fellows, and PAs) designed scenarios to highlight more challenging situations that the patrollers might encounter, including pelvic fractures, hypothermic arrest, and hypoglycemia.  The custom curriculum and on-hill implementation was considered a great success by the patrollers and the Wilderness Medicine Section alike.  Planned future sessions with the LSP include modules on leadership, incident management, and psychological first aid.  

 

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Highlighted Classes

May Costa Rica Pre-Med WFR Class – Join us in Costa Rica May 11-20 to learn about wilderness and emergency medicine with a tropical twist.  See sloths, crocodiles, monkeys, and dozens of species of birds, all front and center in our own tropical paradise. Learn about wilderness medicine interspersed with time at the pool or beach, natural history tours, zip line adventures, whitewater rafting, night hikes, and optional surfing lessons.  Early bird discount ends March 31.  For more information, and/or to register, please go to https://www.coloradowm.org/courses/pre-med/costa-rica/.

Advanced Wilderness Life Support Costa Rica – Earn AWLS certification and 20 CMEs with the University of Colorado School of Medicine’s June wilderness medicine classes. Choose June 18-24 or June 24-30 and learn wilderness medicine skills while participating in authentic wilderness activities such as whitewater rafting, zip-lining, night hikes, and natural history tours in the beauty of Costa Rica’s Pacific Ocean coast. Initially designed for medical students, these two classes are appropriate for any health care professional. For more information, and/or to register, please go to https://www.coloradowm.org/courses/med-student-electives/costaricamedstudentelective/.

 

 

Podcasts

Not necessarily wilderness medicine related, but definitely wilderness and high adventure oriented, check out the Cutting Edge, podcasts from the American Alpine Club:
https://americanalpineclub.org/cutting-edge-podcast.

 

 

Case Study

Glissade Aid


After reaching the summit you are descending Buckeye Peak, an almost 13,000 foot mountain near Leadville (CO).  You return to the top of the snow-filled gully you laboriously ascended an hour or two earlier.  The snow is deep but the avalanche hazard low.  You pull out your ice axe—you’ve been dying to use it—and hop up, landing on your butt to glissade that baby.  You scream in joy all the way down and then leap to your feet to watch one of your buddies follow you.  It looks like she too is having a blast, snow flying high over her head as she rockets down the slope, when near the bottom you see her start to go sideways and then suddenly she catapults through the air and lands off to the side.  You quickly posthole up to her.

Scene and Primary Assessment: You are on a 30 degree slope with low avalanche hazard.  It is moderately cold (20 degrees F.) but with a nasty, maybe 20 MPH wind, otherwise safe.  The rest of your five person crew more carefully descends the slope to join you.  Terry has an airway, she is breathing rapidly and painfully.  You don’t see any blood or major disabilities.  She moans and barely acknowledges you when you ask her how she is and what is wrong.

Secondary Physical: Terry’s physical is normal until you get to her chest.  She almost screams when you palpate the right side of her chest.  You decide you need to look under her parka.  It makes you glad you were smart enough to bring a sleeping pad with you on this winter climb.  You pull out it out and get her to sit on it.  You then unzip her parka and pull up her shirt.  She moans as you do and you watch her rapid breathing but there seems to be minimal movement on her hurt side.  You gently put you hand on the ribs to determine if you can feel anything wrong.  Your hands are too cold to feel much and you are worried about the icy wind so you quickly pull the shirt down and zip up the coat.  You are super worried and wonder if it’s worth even completing the physical in this exposed spot, but you are this far along, you just hurriedly finish it, finding nothing else of note.

SAMPLE Assessment: Symptoms as noted above.  Terry is looking scared and pale.  No allergies.  No relevant history.  In terms of medicine, Terry is taking just naturopathic medicines including zinc, ginkgo, and something else she can’t remember.  She has never felt like this or had a collision like that.  She has been drinking regularly (one and half water bottles since leaving the hut this morning, plus coffee and instant milk with granola this am), ate a reasonable sized lunch, and had a good breakfast.  She was doing fine, “outs” all normal, and enjoying the climb and the exciting glissade, until it ended with her losing control and slamming her side into a boulder.

Vitals: Round 1 – HR 112, RR28, AOx4.  Round 2 (15 minutes after accident) – HR 120, RR 32, AOx4 but anxious..    

Setting: ~12,000 in the Central Rockies.  Skies are clear, about 20 degrees F., but there is a nasty wind above treeline.  There are some crusty drifts up here, but down below snow conditions are near perfect.  It’s almost 2 pm, February 18.  Less than a half mile to a 10th Mountain Division Hut (with wood stove, solar lighting, bunks, etc.), or 3.5 miles to a trailhead, mostly, but not entirely downhill.  You had cell service on the way up but you notice that your battery is dead.  You have a solar recharger at the hut, which also has a first aid kit (though you have no idea what is in it) and you’ve been told a rescue sled.  It’s you and four other friends, not counting Terry.  You all have daypacks with extra clothes, some left over lunch, maybe a liter of water left each, avalanche gear (shovel, transceiver, and probe), ice axes, helmets, plus that sleeping pad.

You think about a snow cave but figure it isn’t far to the hut so you ask Terry if she can walk.  She can, but with difficulty, so you take her pack and slowly walk down to your skis, which are waiting just below the real steep stuff, close to treeline.  By the time you get to the skis Terry is stumbling and only able to go at a snail’s pace.  You decide to get to the trees, let Terry rest, and reassess before getting on the skis.

Reassessment: Round 3 of Vitals – HR 128, RR 36; V on the AVPU scale. You all take a break and then do a reassessment of Terry’s condition.  Now out of the wind you are able to fully expose Terry’s chest.  Terry moans as you carefully work the jacket off and pull up her shirt.  You see a big bruise starting to appear on the right side. It appears she is mainly using her left side to breath.  You gently place your hand on the right side, the hurt side, and you feel crepitus.  It seems part of the chest wall is moving independently of the rest of the chest wall. 
 
You are now about a quarter mile, and a relatively easy ski, from the hut.  It is 3 pm.
 
What do you do?  What is your assessment, anticipated problems, and plan?

 

 

Knowing is not enough; we must apply.  Willing is not enough; we must do.
~ Johann Wolfgang von Goethe
 

 

Check back on our Facebook or Instagram account for case study responses soon! (Answers will be posted on March 12th)

If you are looking for the answers from our last newsletter please visit our website: https://www.coloradowm.org/blog/case-study-january-newsletter-2019/

 

 

7.  The University of Massachusetts Medical School (UMMS) Combined Summer Undergraduate Research Opportunity is a non-credit, ten-week, structured research experience. The program consists of "hands-on" laboratory research with an investigator serving as a mentor, role model and advisor. 

On behalf of program directors, Dr. Brian Lewis and Dr. Pranoti Mandrekar, please share this opportunity with your students and within your various networks: https://www.umassmed.edu/gsbs/outreach-programs/summer-undergraduate-research-program/.

The online application is found at https://www.umassmed.edu/gsbs/outreach-programs/summer-undergraduate-research-program/apply-now/.

The application deadline in March 15, 2019!

 

Best wishes for the New Near!

 

2019 Combined Summer Undergraduate Research Opportunity

Ten Week Program - May 26 - August 2, 2019

 

2018 Summer Fellows

 

Program Description

The University of Massachusetts Medical School (UMMS) Combined Summer Undergraduate Research Opportunity is a non-credit, ten-week, structured research experience. The program consists of "hands-on" laboratory research with an investigator serving as a mentor, role model and advisor.

The Combined Summer Undergraduate Research Opportunity is funded by the National Institute of Health (NIH) and UMMS Provost’s Office.

Goals

The program is designed to provide participants in-depth exposure to actual biomedical research. Participants will develop career-building connections with faculty, postdocs, graduate students, and peers. The program encourages participants to consider biomedical research as a viable career choice.

Why should I apply?

• Intense research experience in state of the art laboratories

• Summer Research Fellows receive a stipend of $4000. Stipends are paid to participants in three payments over the ten-week program

• Travel and housing are paid for and arranged by the program

• Participants engage in networking sessions with UMMS leaders, faculty and trainees

• Participants prepare and present a professional research poster

 

   

Confidentiality Notice:

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8.  Penn State is partnering with Project Drawdown, and recruiting 40 undergraduates to spend eight weeks this summer delving into research projects related to climate change as part of the University's newest Research Experiences for Undergraduates (REU) program. 

Drawdown Penn State
Drawdown Scholars Research Experiences for Undergraduates Program


Penn State is partnering with Project Drawdown, and recruiting 40 undergraduates to spend eight weeks this summer delving into research projects related to climate change as part of the University's newest Research Experiences for Undergraduates (REU) program. Applications are beingaccepted

 now

 for the June 4 - July 31, 2019 program. We invite you to learn more about the Drawdown Scholars program, and to pass along the invitation to others you think may have an interest. 

  

Drawdown Scholars Research Experiences for Undergraduates Program

For Students

Penn State and Project Drawdown are partnering to launch the Drawdown Scholars Research Experiences for Undergraduates Program this summer. Come spend eight week s (June 4 - July 31, 2019) at Penn State, delving into research projects built around modeling, analyzing the feasibility of, and developing curriculum for Drawdown's solutions to address global warming. You will be a part of unique cohort of 40 students from different disciplines working and living together to address one of the greatest challenges of our era: reversing climate change. 

 

Along with a once-in-a-lifetime research experience, Drawdown Scholars will also receive the following:

1.     Penn State University Park participants will receive a $2,000 housing allowance

2.     Non-Penn State University Park participants are eligible to receive travel grants to present research at the Drawdown International Scientific Conference

More information about the program, including how to apply is available here:  https://www.engr.psu.edu/drawdown/

 

 

Applications are due by February 27, 2019

 

About Drawdown Penn State

 

Together, Penn State and  Project Drawdown are working to explore and enhance "the most comprehensive plan ever proposed to reverse global warming." Facing wide-spread fear and apathy, an international coalition of researchers, professionals, and scientists has come together to offer a set of realistic and bold solutions to climate change. Their list became,

Drawdown, a New York Times bestseller, which now offers the map for the Drawdown Scholars Research Experiences for Undergraduates Program at Penn State. 

 

The solutions to reverse global warming already exist. Most are already implemented. Now, we need research and education to see how they're working, to understand how to scale them appropriately, and to communicate these efforts to policymakers and to the public.  

 

Learn more at https://www.engr.psu.edu/drawdown/

--

Ted Toadvine

 

Nancy Tuana Director of The Rock Ethics Institute

Associate Professor of Philosophy

The Pennsylvania State University

 

Editor-in-Chief, Environmental Philosophy

Co-Editor, Chiasmi International

Co-Editor, Contributions to Phenomenology Series, Springer

_______________________________________________
iaep-announce mailing list
iaep-announce@lists.uoregon.edu
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9.  AAMC News:  News About America’s Medical Schools and Teaching Hospitals, February 20, 2019 edition. 

AAMC - Association of American Medical
Colleges

News About America's Medical Schools and Teaching Hospitals

 

February 20, 2019

Calculating

"How much will it really cost?"

At times, prices for medical tests and procedures can be almost impossible for patients to predict or understand. Cutting-edge hospitals are working to change that.

Read More

Convey Logo

To disclose or not to disclose: That is just one of the questions

The relationship between academia and industry — though necessary for innovation — can pose a slew of ethical dilemmas. The AAMC takes a deep dive into conflict of interest and Convey®, an innovative tool that streamlines disclosures.

Read More

Consoling a colleague

Sexual harassment in medicine

Even before the #MeToo movement, national leaders in medicine began taking significant strides to transform the culture and curb unacceptable behavior. The AAMC, with other organizations, has also launched a consortium to advance the professional and ethical conduct, climate, and culture across the science and medical fields.

Read More

In case you missed it: Do student-athletes make good doctors? Also, a match made in medical school.

More from AAMCNews

New report explores burnout among medical school faculty

A new AAMC Analysis in Brief provides a snapshot of burnout in U.S. medical school faculty by examining the prevalence of reported burnout and exploring the relationship with faculty engagement. Results show that all types of medical school faculty reported burnout, including those involved in patient care, those not involved in patient care, and those in basic science departments.
Read More

Gold Foundation launches humanism in health care essay contest

The Gold Foundation invites medical and nursing students to enter its Hope Babette Tang Humanism in Healthcare Essay Contest by submitting reflective writing that describes an experience where humanism was at the core of patient care. Three winners will receive an award of up to $1,000, and winning essays will be published in Academic Medicine, a journal of the AAMC. The deadline is March 15.
Read More

On the move

Erica Friedman, MD, has been appointed interim dean of the CUNY School of Medicine. She previously served as deputy dean and chair of the department of medical education. Friedman is an associate editor for the AAMC's open access journal, MedEdPORTAL.
Read More

Duane Mezwa, MD, has been appointed interim dean of the Oakland University William Beaumont School of Medicine and chief academic officer. He was previously chair of the department of diagnostic radiology and molecular imaging.
Read More

 

10.  The unique curriculum at the Medical School for International Health (MSIH at Ben-Gurion University of the Negev, Beersheva, Israel) prepares physicians to work with diverse populations locally and globally. 

 

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Applying Global Health Concepts Locally

The world is more interconnected than ever before and with that, the 
health of people everywhere is of growing concern to us all.  Diseases do not respect boundaries and countries throughout the
https://gallery.mailchimp.com/0efcbd5002a6c92198432b561/images/7729d80a-d5be-4b2d-8975-c602ce8aa2ab.jpgworld are more diverse than they were even a decade ago. Global health is about improving healthcare worldwide, reducing healthcare disparities and applying global health strategies to underserved populations locally. Students who study global health become more attuned to social justice issues, they gain experience working with diverse communities, and they learn to work effectively with underserved populations. Students learn about community-led programs that can uncover boundless potential for health equity in local communities. The remarkable lessons of global health that they learn can be applied in Malawi, Israel, the U.S., Canada or anywhere worldwide.  

The unique curriculum at the Medical School for International Health (MSIH) prepares physicians to work with diverse populations locally and globally. Israel's diverse population introduces a mixture of ethnicities and national origins rendering it a microcosm of a globalized society.  The curriculum includes:

Through this coursework and clinical work, students learn to understand the global burden of disease and to work in resource poor settings with vulnerable populations.  They learn to work within the complexities of cross-cultural medicine, including working with international organizations, and they gain experience working with diverse communities locally and throughout the world. 

Alumni Update:
Dr. Mimoza Meholli is a 2006 graduate of MSIH and and completed her residency in internal medicine at Jacobi Medical Center.
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She served as a teaching hospitalist, palliative care attending and ethics consultant at Jacobi Medical Center. Dr. Meholli notes that MSIH, "helped me practice medicine in the Bronx, where often times I felt like I was a physician treating patients from all over the world." Learn more about Dr. Meholli's experiences in her video with her alumni reflections.  In 2018, Dr. Meholli was appointed Assistant Dean of students at New York’s Albert Einstein College of Medicine.

Learn More About MSIH

Join us for a webinar.  We will be hosting an informational webinar for any students interested in learning more about MSIH.  Click here to register for the March 21st webinar at 7:00 pm EST.

Ready to apply?  Admissions at MSIH is on a rolling basis.  We are currently accepting applications for the entering class of 2019.  Additional information can be found on our website. 

If you would like more information about the Medical School for International Health, or to schedule an information session at your college or university, please contact the Admissions Office at 844-422-MSIH, visit our website at msih.bgu.ac.il or view the first-year medical student blogs MSIH first year blog.

Best wishes,      
Kelly A. Coleman, MBA
Assistant Director of Recruitment and Public Relations
Medical School for International Health
Coleman@post.bgu.ac.il

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What is the student profile?

Average MCAT is 509

Average GPA is 3.5

Global health interest

Volunteer activities

Undergraduate degree
 

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Accepting applications for the Entering Class of 2019  

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Questions?

Visit us at msih.bgu.ac.il

or email us at
msihadmissions@post.bgu.ac.il
 

 

11.  Grab the Family for a Night Under the Stars at the Memphis Botanic Garden, March 1, 2019! 

 

 

12.  Marginalia:  Q—What happens when you offer live crickets to L’il Girl Jimmie, a bearded dragon? 

A:  https://youtu.be/-0cJrDKuBXs

BY THE WAY, a special ongoing fund has been set up to help pay for food and supplies.  For a mere dollar, just $1(!), you can name an earthworm after an ex and then feed it to L’il Girl Jimmie.  L’il Girl will take care of the rest.  This fund will be called the L’il Girl Jimmie Fund.

Dr. Stan Eisen, Director
Preprofessional Health Programs
Biology Department
Christian Brothers University
650 East Parkway South
Memphis, TN 38104
E-mail: seisen@cbu.edu
http://facstaff.cbu.edu/~seisen/ 
Caduceus Newsletter Archives: http://facstaff.cbu.edu/~seisen/Caduceus.html