Christian Brothers University

www.cbu.edu

Caduceus Newsletter:  Spring 2014.13, Week of April 7

CaduceusDNAHelixLarger

Image from the U.S. Department of Energy Genome Program web site:   http://genomics.energy.gov  

Dr. Stan Eisen, Director
Preprofessional Health Programs
Christian Brothers University

650 East Parkway South
Memphis, TN  38104

Home page:
http://facstaff.cbu.edu/~seisen/ 

Caduceus Newsletter Archives:
http://facstaff.cbu.edu/~seisen/Caduceus.html

 

Well, maybe there is something to the “5-second rule”.

 

 

For more information, please go to Marginalia.  

 

Table of Contents:

 

1.  Events coming up.  

2.  The CBU Physician Assistant Student Society (PASS) is sponsoring a PA Shadow Day, Wednesday, April 9, 2014. 
3.  We will be able to see a total lunar eclipse, Monday, April 14 through Tuesday, April 15, 2014, midnight to 3 a.m., CDT.  

4.  Unite for Sight’s Global Impact Corps provides a hands-on, immersive and unique global health experience.  
5.  The Illinois College of Optometry (Chicago) will host the 7th annual Focus on Your Future Summer Program for underrepresented minority undergraduate students.  
6.  Brown School of Washington University in St. Louis Master of Public Health Newsletter, Spring 2014 edition.  
7.  The University of Colorado School of Medicine announces the inauguration of a Pre-Med Emergency & Wilderness Medicine Program, designed specifically for undergraduate students (or recent grads) interested in medical, nursing, PA, PT, or dental school (or other related health professions
).  
8.    The Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME), the American Osteopathic Association (AOA), and the American Association of Colleges of Osteopathic Medicine (AACOM) have approved an agreement resulting in a single accreditation system for graduate medical education (GME).  
9.  Lipscomb University (Nashville, TN) offers a Master of Science in Biomolecular Science degree.  
10.  St. George’s University School of Veterinary Medicine (Grenada, West Indies) is fully accredited by the American Veterinary Association Council on Education (AVMA COE).  
11.  The Medical School for International Health (Ben-Gurion University of the Negev, Beersheva, Israel) 4th year medical students have a 97% match rate. 

12.  Marginalia:  Apparently, there is something to the 5-second rule for dropped food.  From Scientific American.com.   

 

1.  Events coming up.  

·         Saturday, April 5, 2014:  The Student National Dental Association of UTHSC (Memphis) have organized an “Impressions” program for April 5, 2014, designed to expose college students to the profession of dentistry by opening the College and allowing prospective students access to their students and faculty in a relaxed setting;

·         Tuesday, April 8, 2014:  Medicine Meets Military event, presented by UTHSC and the United States Army Medical Command, to bring students, educators, health care providers, and administrators together as a community for an educational look at Army medicine, 11 a.m., 800 Madison Avenue;

·         Wednesday, April 9, 2014:  The CBU Physician Assistant Student Society (PASS) is sponsoring a PA Shadow Day, Wednesday, April 9, 2014.  For more information, please see Article #2;

·         Monday, April 14 through Tuesday, April 15:  Total lunar eclipse, Midnight to 3 a.m., CDT.  For more information, please see Article #3. 

·         Tuesday, April 15, Noon to 2 p.m.:  CBU’s 18th Annual Student Research Poster Session.  The Alpha Chi Student Research Poster Session will be Tuesday, 15 April 2014 from Noon-2:00pm.  Please submit the title of poster, the co-authors, the name of the course that the poster was prepared for, and the name of the faculty member that is responsible for the course to Dr. Malinda Fitzgerald malinda@cbu.edu by Friday 11 April 2014.  Posters may be set up starting at 10:00am on 15 April 2014.  The Poster Session schedule will be similar to the 2013 session:  http://facstaff.cbu.edu/aross/biodept/Posters-2013/Research-Posters-2013.htm

 

 

2.  The CBU Physician Assistant Student Society (PASS) is sponsoring a PA Shadow Day, Wednesday, April 9, 2014. 

P.A.S.S.  PA Shadow Day Itinerary

April 9, 2014

 

 

8:00 – 9:30 Sit in on a Lecture: Ages 65 and Older Medicine aka Geriatric Medicine

 

9:30- 12:00 Brief Lesson on the History of the PA Profession

-          Learn how the PA Profession got started!!!

 

                       Snapshot: What does it take to get into PA School?

-          If you are not sure this is the session for you. Hear several student stories about how they got into PA School at CBU!!!!

 

                       PA Mock Interview Session

-          Practice makes perfect when it comes to the PA interview! In this session you will have the chance to hear and answer numerous authentic PA interview questions. You will also receive a printed copy of the questions once you have completed the session.

 

12:00-1:00 Lunch with your fellow P.A.S.S. Members….Don’t be shy!!!!

 

 

1:00 – 2:00 Physical Exam in the Lab

                       In this session you will have the chance to see how the physical exam is done. You may be a

                       patient if you would like or you can simply have fun viewing the eardrum, listening to bowel

                       sounds as well as to the heart and the lungs!!!

 

                                       

 

 

 

P.A.S.S.  PA Shadow Day Itinerary

April 10, 2013

 

2:00 – 3:00 – Personal Statement…..What’s That?

                           - If you are unsure about how to construct your personal statement for PA school we are

 here to help. In this session you will also get the chance to view the personal statement 

 of several students who were accepted into the CBU PA Program!

 

3:00 – 4:00 – It’s Not a Resume!

                             - Buff up your CV in this session.

 

4:00 – 5:00 – Study Skills Session

                             - The transition from undergraduate studies to graduate can be daunting but you can do

                                it! Learn from current students which study methods are most helpful.

 

 

5:00 – 6:00 – HAPPY HOUR Outside the Buc

-          Come meet greet and hang out!!

                       

 

          

 

 

3.  We will be able to see a total lunar eclipse, Monday, April 14 through Tuesday, April 15, 2014, midnight to 3 a.m., CDT.  

According the Brother Kevin Ryan, it will be clearly visible in Memphis, easy to see with the naked eye or with binoculars.  A telescope will be set up in the Stritch parking lot.

All are invited…except for clouds.

Here is NASA’s take on the upcoming eclipse:  http://eclipse.gsfc.nasa.gov/OH/OH2014.html#LE2014Apr15T

 

4.  Unite for Sight’s Global Impact Corps provides a hands-on, immersive and unique global health experience.  

Global Impact Corps: Global Health Volunteer Abroad Opportunity
http://www.uniteforsight.org/volunteer-abroad


Join Unite For Sight’s Global Impact Corps for a hands-on, immersive and unique global health experience. A transformative volunteer abroad experience for students and professionals, Unite For Sight is renowned as the highest quality global health immersion and volunteer abroad program worldwide. Unite For Sight prides itself on offering the best global health experience for our volunteers, coupled with the highest quality healthcare delivery programs with our local doctor partners.

Locations of Year-Round Health Care Delivery: Ghana, Honduras, and India
(volunteer for 7 days, 15 days, 20 days, 4 weeks, 6 weeks, 8 weeks, 10 weeks, or more)

What do Unite For Sight volunteers do? Unite For Sight’s Volunteer Abroad Program is an immersive global health experience for students and professionals who are interested in public health, international development, medicine, or social entrepreneurship.  Volunteers participate with and learn from Unite For Sight's talented local partner doctors who have provided care to nearly 1.8 million patients living in poverty, including more than 80,000 sight-restoring surgeries. Volunteers assist with patient education, visual acuity testing, patient intake, distributing the glasses and medication prescribed by the local eye doctors, and other important support tasks.  They also have the opportunity to observe the surgeries provided by the local doctors.  Additionally, volunteers may participate in the Global Impact Lab, an optional program for those interested in pursuing research. For example, we currently have volunteers pursuing research studies about medication management, the use of visual resources for patient education, traditional medicine practices, and patient barriers to eye care.

Unite For Sight is the only organization in the world that:

  • is a healthcare delivery organization that also offers immersive global health education opportunities for students and professionals;
  • uses 100% of all donations and funds submitted to directly provide care for patients who are otherwise unable to access or afford care;
  • directly teaches the importance of supporting and assisting local professionals in their own social ventures to eliminate disparities in their communities and countries;
  • offers an opportunity to learn from local medical professionals about effective strategies to reach the hardest-to-reach patients in villages, slums, and refugee camps;
  • develops comprehensive training materials in cultural competency, ethics, and global health best practices to prepare its volunteers for a high-impact immersive experience.

Complete details are available online at http://www.uniteforsight.org/volunteer-abroad

 

 

5.  The Illinois College of Optometry (Chicago) will host the 7th annual Focus on Your Future Summer Program for underrepresented minority undergraduate students.  

The Illinois College of Optometry will host the 7th annual Focus on Your Future Summer Program for underrepresented minority undergraduate students. The program is a weeklong experience that will expose undergraduate students to the profession of optometry in a variety of settings. Participants will have the opportunity to meet and work with current optometry students, ICO Faculty & Staff, as well as practicing optometrists.

 

Students will be housed at no charge in our Residential Complex. There is no cost to participate in this program. Participants are responsible for their travel expenses and/or transportation cost to and from ICO.

 

Program Dates: Monday, July 14 - Friday, July 18, 2014

 

Application Deadline: Friday, April 11, 2014

 

Notification: Applicants will be notified no later than Friday, May 9, 2014

 

For eligibility and application information, visit http://www.ico.edu/admissions/events-for-prospective-students/focus-on-your-future/. Please feel free to contact me if you and/or your students have any questions.

 

Thank you in advance for sharing this information with your students.

 

Best regards,

 

Teisha Johnson, M.S.
Senior Director of Admissions


Illinois College of Optometry
3241 South Michigan Ave.
Chicago, IL 60616-3878


T: 312-949-7407

F: 312-949-7399

ICO.edu | blog.ico.edu

 

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6.  Brown School of Washington University in St. Louis Master of Public Health Newsletter, Spring 2014 edition.  

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Claire LaSee, MPH/MSW, ‘12

Epidemiologist at the Washington State Department of Health, Olympia, WA

Claire works in the Infectious Disease Assessment Unit, focusing on sexually transmitted diseases. After a recent outbreak in several counties, the work of her unit was featured on NPR and in Time magazine.  read more

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Jaime Bodden, MPH/MSW, ‘12

Director/Health Officer for the Shawano-Menominee Counties Health Department, Shawano, WI

Jaime enjoys working with a wide range of partners including service agencies, governments (both county and tribal), community groups and individual leaders. “I’m living and working in a rural area, which has unique health issues and needs.”  read more

 

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Gernes wins U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) recognition

Rebecca Gernes, a dual-degree MPH/MSW ’14 candidate, was chosen by the EPA for the Toxic Release Inventories University Challenge for the 2013-14 academic year. She is studying the relationship between air pollution and asthma in the St. Louis, Missouri area.  read more

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Sequeira, MPH ’13, helps assess health impact of school location

Locating a school within a transit-oriented development could deliver significant public health benefits, concludes a recently published report. Sonia Sequeira contributed to this report - one of the first in the nation to consider the impact of health when deciding where to build a school.
read more

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Fairchild wins CECCR poster award

Maggie Fairchild, MPH ’14 candidate, was honored at the 10th Annual meeting of the Centers of Excellence in Cancer Communication Research (CECCR). Maggie’s poster, “Tracking the spread of MIYO: Dissemination activities and adoption of a cancer communication innovation,” won second prize.  read more

 

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Rivera-Nunez study links drinking-water disinfectants to preterm deliveries

Pregnant women who drink water with some disinfectant by-products during the second trimester have a higher risk for preterm delivery (PTD), according to a study led by Zorimar Rivera-Nunez, PhD, assistant professor.  read more

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Health effects of discrimination found in both blacks and whites

Health benefits associated with increased socioeconomic position (SEP) could be undermined by racial discrimination, particularly among whites, according to a study by Darrell L. Hudson, PhD, assistant professor. It was the first study to examine the interaction of life course SEP and racial discrimination on mental and physical health.  read more

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Iannotti recommends low-dose vitamin A regimen for acute malnutrition

New findings from Lora L. Iannotti, PhD, assistant professor, suggest that children with severe acute malnutrition should be given a low-dose regimen of vitamin A supplementation (VAS). Iannotti’s review of the literature from 1950-2012 found high-dose VAS could result in adverse effects, such as respiratory infection or diarrhea.  read more

 

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Kreuter named associate dean of public health at the Brown School

Matthew W. Kreuter, PhD, is a professor and the founder of the Brown School’s Health Communication Research Laboratory.  He oversees the Master of Public Health program, which features transdisciplinary problem-solving approaches to help students improve population health.
read more

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School offers new MPH program specializations

The Global Health specialization focuses on issues most pertinent to low- and middle-income countries. The Epidemiology/biostatistics specialization trains students in research methods used to describe and understand public health problems and apply that knowledge to improve population health.  read more

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Brown School expansion on track

Work continues on a two-year, $60 million expansion that will bring together the Brown School’s public health and social work programs and is slated for completion in 2015.  read more

 

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Brown School at American Public Health Association

The Brown School will be at APHA this November in New Orleans, Louisiana. If you will be attending, presenting or would like to attend our reception, please drop us a line. mphprogram@brownschool.wustl.edu

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Stay Connected

If you would like to provide updated contact info, news, practicum opportunities or job postings, please send them our way. mphprogram@brownschool.wustl.edu

 

Brown School at Washington University in St. Louis
Campus Box 1196, One Brookings Drive, St. Louis, MO 63130-4899


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Join the conversation online.

 

7.  The University of Colorado School of Medicine announces the inauguration of a Pre-Med Emergency & Wilderness Medicine Program, designed specifically for undergraduate students (or recent grads) interested in medical, nursing, PA, PT, or dental school (or other related health professions).  

From Dr. Todd Miner, Instructor, Department of Emergency Medicine, Wilderness Medicine Section: 

I am writing to announce the inaugural University of Colorado School of Medicine Pre-Med Emergency & Wilderness Medicine Program, designed specifically for undergraduate students (or recent grads) interested in medical, nursing, PA, PT, or dental school (or other related health professions).  Registration is now open for three offerings of the program this summer: June 1-13; August 8-20; and August 20-September 1.

The program involves a week on the University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus with lectures (mainly by medical school faculty), scenarios, simulation labs, emergency department shadowing, and EMS ride-alongs covering general and emergency medicine and then a week at a camp in the heart of the Rockies where we'll focus more on wilderness medicine including lectures, lots of scenarios, and a three-day backpacking experience. 

We are actively seeking a diverse student body.  Five to six full scholarships, based on need, are available for each of the sections.  See attachment for application.

You can learn more about the program at http://www.coloradowm.org/undergraduate_courses.html, or directly register at https://www.regonline.com/UofColoEmergWildMed.   Background info that describes the program in more detail is shown below.  

Sincerely,

Dr. Todd Miner

Instructor

Department of Emergency Medicine, Wilderness Medicine Section

University of Colorado School of Medicine

607-592-5224

todd.miner@ucdenver.edu

www.Coloradowm.org

http://wms.org/conferences/adventure/

 

A description of the program:

University of Colorado

School of Medicine

Undergraduate Courses in Emergency and Wilderness Medicine



For undergraduate college students (and recent grads) the University of Colorado School of Medicine is offering an exciting new hands-on opportunity to explore the fields of emergency and wilderness medicine.  This two week program begins in Denver and concludes at a camp and backcountry in the heart of the Rocky Mountains. 

 

The hospital-based first week will includes lectures from experts in international humanitarian relief, wilderness medicine and disaster response work; an ambulance ride-along with paramedic crews; shadowing residents and faculty physicians in a world-class emergency room; and hands-on skills labs including CPR, suturing, splinting and ultrasound workshops. 

The second week takes students to a basecamp located in the heart of the Rocky Mountains to focus on applying skills learned during the initial coursework. Learn or enhance outdoor skills such as map and compass, backpacking, canoeing, and rock climbing. Participate in authentic, scenario-based learning designed to teach the skills necessary to prevent, assess, and treat a variety of backcountry challenges and emergencies ranging from blisters to major trauma.

 

In addition to learning about emergency and wilderness medicine, students will meet with members of medical school admissions committees and get the inside scoop on the medical school application process.  Students will also have time get to know successful emergency room physicians (as well as PAs, paramedics, and nurses), and learn what it takes to excel in a medical career. 

 

This unique program includes all instruction, labs and simulations, EMS ride-alongs, Emergency Department shadowing, lunches and snacks, a week at a local camp (all food and lodging included), recreational activities, transportation to and from camp, group camping gear, and a certificate of completion.  It does not include breakfasts, dinners, and lodging for the first week, nor personal camping equipment.

 

Five to six full scholarships are available for each of the three 2014 sections.  To apply for a scholarships potential students can contact Dr. Todd Miner at todd.miner@ucdenver.edu.

 

At the completion of the two-week hands-on program, students will have gained invaluable exposures to emergency and wilderness medicine.  Students will better understand the track to medical school and have obtained a valuable addition to their application to medical or other health professional schooling.  They will benefit from getting to know medical school faculty and inside knowledge regarding a successful medical career, and perhaps most importantly, they will have gained the skills to treat and/or save the life of a friend or family member in the event of an emergency in the backcountry or just the backyard.

                                                                                                                             

 

Key Questions

Who: Undergraduate students interested in exploring a career in medicine or other health professions (nursing, PA, paramedic, dental, etc.).  Recent grads interested in applying to medical school.  Anyone looking to get an edge up and outstanding experience for the application process to medical school or other health professions. 

What: A comprehensive two week introductory course to emergency and wilderness medicine. 

When: June 1-13; August 8-20; August 20-September 1

Where: The first week will be located in Denver, a thriving, hip, metropolitan city and the second week will be located at basecamp in the heart of the Rocky Mountains. 

Why: At the end of this course, students will have learned valuable skills in assessing and treating patients in an emergency or wilderness medical crisis, gained shadowing exposure with paramedics and physicians in an emergency setting, and met members of a medical school admission team to discover how to be more successful in medical applications. Students will also be given a certificate of completion, documenting their participation.

 

How Much: June program - $1795; August programs - $1895

 

To register please go to

 https://www.regonline.com/ UofColoEmergWildMed


For further information, and/or to apply for a scholarship, please contact

Dr. Todd Miner at todd.miner@ucdenver.edu

 

 

 

Financial Aid Application:

"-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Financial Aid Application

University of Colorado School of Medicine

Pre-Medicine Emergency and Wilderness Medicine Program

Name: ____________________________     E-Mail: _______________________________

Phone: _________________  Mailing Address: ____________________________________________

Home School: __________________________          Expected Year of Graduation: _______

1. Applying for which dates:

            __ June 1-13                __ August 8-20                       __ August 20-Sept. 1

2. Indicate percentage of any financial aid package

__% Loans         __% Scholarships        __% Grants        __% Other (describe:__________________________)

3. Were you awarded Pell Grant for 2013-24 academic year: __Yes  __No   __No, but was in _______ academic year

4. 2013 Personal and Family Gross Annual Income:*

            __ less than $15,000               __ $15,000-$34,999                __ $35,000-$59,999

            __ $60,000-$74,999                __ $75,000-$99,999                __$100,000-$149,999

            __  more than $150,000

*If you or your parents/guardians filed and IRS tax return, gross annual income will be recorded

on IRS form 1040—line 22, Form 1040A—line 18, or Form 1040EZ—line 4

            __ Listed amount is from IRS tax return

5. Total family size, including yourself, parents/siblings, and other dependents living at home: ___

6. Number of siblings (not counting yourself) attending full time higher education in 2013 or 2014: ___

7. Gender, Ethnicity, and Age (Questions 6-11 are optional)

            Gender:              ­­__ Female     __ Male           __ Other (please describe - ___________________)

            Ethnicity:  __ Hispanic, Chicano, Mexican, Latino, Cuban, Puerto Rican, Central/South American

                             __ American Indian or Alaska Native                   __ Black or African-American

                             __ Pacific Islander or Native Hawaiian     __ Asian

8. Is English your native language: __ Yes  __ No (if no, primary language - ______________________)

9. Parents country of birth (only if not born in the US)

            Father/Guardian: ___________________      Mother/Guardian: _________________

10. Family Education Background – Indicate highest level of formal education attained by your parents or legal guardians:

            __ less than high school graduate                   __ high school graduate or equivalent

            __ 2-year college degree or tech school                      __ bachelor degree

            __ master degree                                             __ doctoral degree

11. Other information that would help describe your need for financial aid:

 

 

 

 

 

 

I attest that to the best of my knowledge, the information submitted on this application is true and complete. I understand that if found to be otherwise, it is sufficient cause for refusal or dismissal from the program.

 

Signed: ________________________________                   Date: _______________

 

Please return to Dr. Todd Miner at todd.miner@ucdenver.edu

"------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

 

 

8.    The Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME), the American Osteopathic Association (AOA), and the American Association of Colleges of Osteopathic Medicine (AACOM) have approved an agreement resulting in a single accreditation system for graduate medical education (GME).  

The Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME), the American Osteopathic Association (AOA), and the American Association of Colleges of Osteopathic Medicine (AACOM) have approved an agreement resulting in a single accreditation system for graduate medical education (GME).   The leadership of all three organizations believe that this approach to GME accreditation not only streamlines but also strengthens the postdoctoral education process.

To serve you as Pre-Health Advisors and your aspiring premedical students, please find the attached PDF, “Pathway to Medical Practice in the U.S.”  It is an extremely helpful advising tool, published by the Federation of State Medical Boards (www.fsmb.org)   The document provides greater clarity about IMG requirements for taking the USMLE and more accurate color coding overall.   The document is still conveniently two pages long but may be formatted as one sheet with two sides and can be electronically forwarded, copied or printed, as needed. It has electronic links to all of the organizations listed on it.   As the unification of GME accreditation moves forward in the months and years ahead, the FSMB will update the pathway as needed.

 For more information on GME, please view the links below:

·      AACOM Student Survey on Unified GME Accreditation

·      Student Factsheet

·      Joint Press Release

·      FAQs

·      Media Coverage

 

We hope you find this document and the links above, valuable advising tools, when meeting with your students.  

 

Thank you in advance for your support,

Gina

 

Gina M. Moses, M.Ed.

Associate Director of Application Services

 

cid:image001.png@01CF4CEE.F52D2E20-------------------------------------------------

American Association of Colleges of Osteopathic Medicine
5550 Friendship Blvd, Suite 310 | Chevy Chase, MD 20815 

p 301-968-4184  | f 301-968-4191

 

 

9.  Lipscomb University (Nashville, TN) offers a Master of Science in Biomolecular Science degree.  

Lipscomb University's Master of Science in Biomolecular Science program is currently accepting applications for its annual three cohorts on a rolling basis. It is a non-thesis master's degree created specifically to better prepare successful undergraduates for medical, dental or veterinary school, or help those with a biological sciences background to develop greater opportunities in a range of growing biology-related fields. It is the only one of its kind in the region and has already attracted students from around the country.

 

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This 30-hour program has a unique emphasis on laboratory techniques common in the biotech sector and can be completed with evening classes in about 12 months. It is offered in eight-week blocks (with five blocks per calendar year) and students may enter the program each year in June, August or January. Classes are offered during the evenings to accommodate busy working professionals, with lecture courses meeting twice each week and labs meeting once each week. Faculty also offers personal advising, study skills support and help in preparing applications to graduate schools.

 

Lipscomb University is a faith-based institution founded in 1891 and is continually ranked as one of the best universities in the South. It has also been named one of the top 20 regional master's universities by U.S. News and World Report's "2014 America's Best Colleges" guidebook.

 

More information can be found at lipscomb.edu/biology/graduate-program. To learn more about Lipscomb University visit lipscomb.edu.

 

Feel free to share our information and website with your students and please let me know if you have questions or need additional information. Information sessions are held regularly, and faculty is available to communicate one-on-one with any prospective student.

 

Best Regards,

 

Kent Gallaher, Ph.D.

Professor and Chair - Department of Biology

Lipscomb University

kent.gallaher@lipscomb.edu

 

10.  St. George’s University School of Veterinary Medicine (Grenada, West Indies) is fully accredited by the American Veterinary Association Council on Education (AVMA COE).  

 

 

 

11.  The Medical School for International Health (Ben-Gurion University of the Negev, Beersheva, Israel) 4th year medical students have a 97% match rate. 

This email is a paid announcement being sent as a service to The Medical School for International Health.  Please direct your inquiries to them.

 

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MSIH 4th year medical students have 97% match rate

Fourth year medical students at the Medical School for International Health celebrated their near-perfect match on Friday, March 21, 2014, when they found out that 97% of those who entered the National Resident Matching Program (NRMP) were matched into residency programs in the United States.


http://ih.constantcontact.com/fs134/1105132857422/img/433.pngThe NRMP advance data reported that US seniors matched at 94.4%, a slightly higher number than last year as new residency slots are created. The overall match rate for all applicants was 75%.

 

25% of MSIH fourth-year medical students or alumni who entered the match this year placed in either Pediatrics or Family Medicine (see graph at left), with another 12.5% placing into Internal Medicine. 

 

Highlights of the match include Bram Wispelwey, MS, a graduate of Columbia University's Institute of Human Nutrition (IHN), who was selected for Harvard University's Brigham and Women's Hospital in Boston, Massachusetts. He will be specializing in Internal Medicine.


Another IHN graduate, Lauren Cook-Chaimowitz, MS, entered the Canadian Residency Matching Program (CaRMS), and was selected by the Department of Emergency Medicine at McMaster University in Hamilton, Ontario Canada.

http://ih.constantcontact.com/fs134/1105132857422/img/434.jpgTobin Greensweig, (seen at left with MSIH co-director Richard Deckelbaum, MD) was featured in last week's enews update; Tobin will be moving to Indianapolis, Indiana to begin his Medicine-Pediatrics residency at Indiana University's School of Medicine.  

 

Sarah Corbridge, a graduate of Northwestern University and a native of Evanston, Illinois, will spend her first year of residency at Maimonides Medical Center in Brooklyn, New York. She was selected for a PGY-1 preliminary year in Medicine. She will then move back to the Midwest, to do her PGY-2 year in the Department of Neurology at the University of Wisconsin's School of Medicine in Madison. 

 

David Kawior, a Yeshiva University graduate, will be returning home to Chicago, where he will begin his Emergency Medicine residency at Resurrection Medical Center in Chicago, Illinois. 

 

Irene Koplinka-Loehr, a recipient of a tuition scholarship to help cover her first year of medical school at the MSIH, was selected for the Family Medicine/Inner City residency program at the University of Rochester's Strong Memorial Hospital. We know that Irene's family, who lives in Ithaca, New York, will be grateful that instead of a ten-hour plane ride, it will only take them a ninety-minute drive to visit her. 

 

Another first-year tuition scholarship winner, Isaac Hatton, will be in the same state as Tobin, as he has been selected for the Family Medicine residency program at Memorial Hospital in South Bend, Indiana.
 
For more information on the 2014 match, you can visit our residency page here or view the MSIH residency placements from 2014-2002

 

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Do you fit the profile?

 

Average MCAT is 31


Average GPA is 3.49

 

Global health interest

 

Volunteer activities

Undergraduate degree

Apply Now for 2014!

 

We are accepting 

applications for July 2014.

 

Click here for the application 

Questions?

 

Visit us at MSIH.net

 

or email us at

bgcu-md@columbia.edu

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Our mailing address is:

Medical School for International Health

630 West 168th street, suite PH1501

New York, NY  10032

 

Copyright © 2014 MSIH All rights reserved. 

 

12.  Marginalia:  Apparently, there is something to the 5-second rule for dropped food.  From Scientific American.com.   

From:  http://www.scientificamerican.com/article/fact-or-fiction-the-5-second-rule-for-dropped-food/

Fact or Fiction?: The 5-Second Rule for Dropped Food

There may be some actual science behind this popular deadline for retrieving grounded goodies

Mar 25, 2014 |By Larry Greenemeier

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This scanning electron micrograph (SEM) shows a strain of Staphylococcus aureusbacteria.


Courtesy of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s Public Health Image Library, via Wikimedia Common

You’re about to savor your first bite from a delicious candy apple when, just as your teeth are about to sink in, the fruit–candy combo slips from its stick and plummets to the ground. The clock is ticking. You quickly snatch the fallen morsel, well within five seconds—the acknowledged time limit for determining whether dropped food should end up in your mouth or in the trash.
 
What happens next is generally a judgment call depending on several factors—what was dropped, where it was dropped and the victim’s level of hunger. What to do could also pivot on whether or not the most recent health column you read covering this topic on the Web said that you could get away with putting the dropped food in your mouth without a trip to the emergency room. A lot of research—and common sense, really—might indicate that any dropped food carries a risk of collecting bacteria. So the only real questions might be how great the risk is and whether it’s worth taking.
 
Food retrieved just a few seconds after being dropped is less likely to contain bacteria than if it is left for longer periods of time, researchers at Aston University’s School of Life and Health Sciences in England recently reported. The Aston team also noted that the type of surface on which the food has been dropped has an effect, with bacteria least likely to transfer from carpeted surfaces. Bacteria is much more likely to linger if moist foods make contact for more than five seconds with wood laminate or tiled surfaces.
 
The current study, undertaken by six final-year biology students led by Aston microbiology professor Anthony Hilton, is likely to only inflame an ongoing debate about this informal rule of food safety, as other studies have found that pathogens transfer themselves to food as soon as that piece of meat or candy hits the kitchen tiles.
 
The researchers found that the initial impact immediately transferred at least a small proportion of bacteria resident on a floor to just about any type of food. Moist foods left longer than 30 seconds, however, contained up to 10 times more bacteria than food picked up after three seconds. “We believe that additional contact is being made between the moist food and the floor as it settles further onto the floor,” Hilton says. Dry foods dropped on the carpet experienced the slowest rate of bacterial migration.
 
The researchers monitored the transfer of the common bacteria Escherichia coli andStaphylococcus

 aureus

the latter of which causes staph infectionsfrom a variety of indoor floor types to toast, pasta, biscuits and a sticky sweet when contact was made from three to 30 seconds.
 
Hilton and his students had initially been studying the survival and transfer of bacteria on indoor flooring surfaces. The researchers found staph to be the most commonly isolated bacterium on the flooring they examined. They included E. coli in their work because it is a common gut bacterium, often used to model how other gut pathogens—such as salmonella—respond under different conditions. “We introduced time as a factor as a bit of a quirky parameter to explore and didn’t really expect it to show anything significant,” he says.
 
The researchers speculate that the contact area made between food and floor surface is significant. “On a smooth surface like tile or laminate the area of contact is greater than when the food is suspended on the tips of the fibers of the carpet,” Hilton says. “I think the results from the carpet were the most surprising in transferring very low numbers of bacteria to food and not demonstrating the same effect of time in enhancing transfer.”
 
Most of the 495 people that Hilton and his team surveyed as part of their research had heard of the so-called “five-second rule” but “there was still a good number of people that hadn’t,” he says. Regardless, 87 percent of survey participants who adhere to the five-second rule said they would eat food dropped on the floor or already have done so. The researchers also found that 81 percent of females surveyed use the rule, compared with 64 percent of males. Hilton says he doesn’t have a good explanation for this gender differentiation but points out that this finding is consistent with other research into the five-second rule. One possible conclusion: This is tacit confirmation of another piece of folk wisdom—men are less discerning when it comes to their food’s cleanliness.
 
The research began as a class project, but Hilton says widespread interest in the results has encouraged him to prepare the work for submission to a peer-reviewed journal.
 
The Aston findings give the dropped-food guideline more legitimacy than have other studies, which tend to consider the rule unadulterated baloney. “We found that bacteria was transferred from tabletops and floors to the food within five seconds—that is, the five-second rule is not an accurate guide when it comes to eating food that has fallen on the floor,” said Paul Dawson, a professor in Clemson University’s Department of Food, Nutrition and Packaging Sciences, following his 2007 study. That study, published in the Journal of Applied Microbiology, was primarily aimed at measuring the persistence of bacteria on surfaces.
 
The Clemson researchers found that Salmonella typhimurium “can be transferred to the foods tested almost immediately on contact” and that the bacteria can survive for up to four weeks on dry surfaces in high-enough populations to be transferred to foods.
 
A 2003 study by then high-school senior Jillian Clarke, during an internship at the University of Illinois at Urbana–Champaign, likewise found that bacteria transfers to food immediately on contact. In her experiment E. coli moved from floor tiles to cookies and gummy bears well within five seconds.
 
Most studies, it would seem, discourage adherence to the five-second rule. So, even though Aston’s findings suggest that allowing dropped food to linger on the floor certainly increases the risk of bacterial transfer to that fallen indulgence, it’s better to think twice before eating anything that touches an unsavory surface—whether it’s your kitchen floor or your favorite diner.

Dr. Stan Eisen, Director
Preprofessional Health Programs
Biology Department
Christian Brothers University
650 East Parkway South
Memphis, TN 38104
E-mail: seisen@cbu.edu
http://www.cbu.edu/~seisen/
Caduceus Newsletter Archives: http://www.cbu.edu/~seisen/Caduceus.html