Christian Brothers University

www.cbu.edu

Caduceus Newsletter:  Spring 2014.12, Week of March 31

CaduceusDNAHelixLarger

Image from the U.S. Department of Energy Genome Program web site:   http://genomics.energy.gov  

Dr. Stan Eisen, Director
Preprofessional Health Programs
Christian Brothers University
650 East Parkway South
Memphis, TN  38104

Home page:
http://facstaff.cbu.edu/~seisen/ 

Caduceus Newsletter Archives:
http://facstaff.cbu.edu/~seisen/Caduceus.html

 

 

Chocolate:  Resistance is futile.

 

GodivaSp2008Pic04

 

For more information about this year’s Dinstuhl’s Chocolate Tasting Session, please go to Marginalia.  

 

Table of Contents:

 

1.  Events coming up.  
2.  ===AAMC STAT===, News from the Association of American Medical Colleges, March 24, 2014 edition.  
3.  The University of Miami will be hosting an open house for all prospective students interested in their Master of Public Health Program.  
4.  The Association of Schools and Colleges of Optometry (ASCO) announces a FREE Optometry Virtual Fair on April 17, 2014.   
5.  The National Society for Nontraditional Premedical and Medical Students announces its 14th OldPreMeds and OldMeds National Conference, June 5-8, 2014 in Washington, DC.  
6.  The Association of American Veterinary Medical Colleges announces its VetSchool Student Engagement System, which will facilitate targeted newsletters and other information specific to the category (High School, Undergraduates, Pre-Vets, Applicants, Advisors and parents) they assign when signing up.  
7. 
Students virtually dissect hologram-like 3-D cadaver, from R&D Daily.  
8.  Lincoln Memorial University offers a Master’s Degree with four concentrations:  Anatomical Sciences, Biomedical Professions, Life Science Research, and Life Science Teaching.  
9.  Scientists find that 25 gm of Cocoa Powder a Day Keeps the Doctor Away – from the 2014 National Meeting & Exposition of the American Chemical Society, Dallas. 

10.  Marginalia:  Speaking of cocoa (and its derivatives)  

 

1.  Events coming up.  

·         Saturday, April 5, 2014:  The Student National Dental Association of UTHSC (Memphis) have organized an “Impressions” program for April 5, 2014, designed to expose college students to the profession of dentistry by opening the College and allowing prospective students access to their students and faculty in a relaxed setting;

·         Tuesday, April 8, 2014:  Medicine Meets Military event, presented by UTHSC and the United States Army Medical Command, to bring students, educators, health care providers, and administrators together as a community for an educational look at Army medicine, 11 a.m., 800 Madison Avenue;

·         Tuesday, April 15, Noon to 2 p.m.:  CBU’s 18th Annual Student Research Poster Session.  The Alpha Chi Student Research Poster Session will be Tuesday, 15 April 2014 from Noon-2:00pm.  Please submit the title of poster, the co-authors, the name of the course that the poster was prepared for, and the name of the faculty member that is responsible for the course to Dr. Malinda Fitzgerald malinda@cbu.edu by Friday 11 April 2014.  Posters may be set up starting at 10:00am on 15 April 2014.  The Poster Session schedule will be similar to the 2013 session:  http://facstaff.cbu.edu/aross/biodept/Posters-2013/Research-Posters-2013.htm

 

 

2.  ===AAMC STAT===, News from the Association of American Medical Colleges, March 24, 2014 edition.  

http://www.aamc.org/em/lyris/images/stat.jpg

News from the Association of American Medical Colleges

March 24, 2014

• Match Day Success but Concerns Remain About Future Residency Positions
• NQF Draft Report Recommends Including Socioeconomic Factors
• AAMC Develops Health Equity Research Snapshot
• Study Examines “Pipeline Leaks” from High School to Medical School
• Register for the Next Interprofessional Education Collaborative Institute
• Trials to Examine Effects of Duty Hours on Learning, Working Environment



Match Day Success but Concerns Remain About Future Residency Positions

The 2014 Match had a total of 34,270 active applicants, including 17,374 U.S. M.D. seniors who competed for 29,671 positions, according to data released by the National Resident Matching Program. There were 26,678 first-year positions offered and modest increases reported in the number of U.S. seniors choosing primary care specialties. Despite the success of this year’s Match, the AAMC remains concerned about the number of available residency positions for new physicians in the future.

Citing preliminary data analysis, AAMC President and CEO Darrell G. Kirch, M.D., issued a statement saying it appeared several hundred U.S. medical seniors did not match to a first-year program. “As a result, with a serious physician shortage looming closer, we remain concerned that the 17-year cap on federal support of new doctor training will impede the necessary growth in residency positions that must occur to ensure that our growing and aging population will receive the care it needs.”


NQF Draft Report Recommends Including Socioeconomic Factors

Socioeconomic status factors (SES) should be included as a factor in the risk-adjustment methodology for certain accountability factors in pay-for-performance programs, according a draft report developed by a National Quality Forum (NQF) expert panel. Provider outcome measures typically are adjusted to account for differences in patient health status and clinical factors (e.g., severity of illness and comorbidities), but not SES, which can include income, race, English proficiency, and education. The panel determined that not adjusting for SES could harm patients by leading to greater disparities in care and fewer resources for safety net providers to treat disadvantaged populations. The panel comprises 26 individuals representing a diverse group of stakeholders, including AAMC Chief Public Policy Officer Atul Grover, M.D., Ph.D.


AAMC Develops Health Equity Research Snapshot

The AAMC has developed the Health Equity Research Snapshot to highlight promising new research underway at AAMC-member institutions. As part of the commitment to improving the health of patients and populations, academic medical centers conduct health equity research to identify solutions to systematic and avoidable inequities in health and health care. The AAMC is building member capacity for disparities research and promoting health equity as a goal of research, quality improvement, and clinical activities at the nation’s medical schools and teaching hospitals.


Study Examines “Pipeline Leaks” from High School to Medical School

A new AAMC Analysis in Brief examines the extent to which socioeconomic status and race matters in keeping aspiring medical students in the “pipeline” to becoming a physician. The results show that segments of the population that historically have had low representation among the physician workforce (e.g., blacks, Hispanics, women, and those whose parents have less than a college degree) are more likely to aspire to a career as a physician than they are to apply or be accepted into medical school. Researchers hope that future analyses can determine the causes of these leaks and lead to interventions to build a more diverse and effective physician workforce.


Register for the Next Interprofessional Education Collaborative Institute

Registration is open for the next Interprofessional Education Collaborative (IPEC) Institute to be held May 4–-7 in Herndon, Va. Focusing on the fundamentals of interprofessional education, institute attendees will participate in team-based activities and have opportunities to consult with peers in order to develop an interprofessional project at their institutions. To learn more about the institute and how to register as a team, visit the IPEC website.


Trials to Examine Effects of Duty Hours on Learning and Working Environment

In a letter to the graduate medical education community, Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) CEO Thomas J. Nasca, M.D., announced two national multicenter trials on resident duty hours in the learning and working environment. The trials will focus on internal medicine and general surgery programs. To read the letter, visit the ACGME website.

 

 

3.  The University of Miami will be hosting an open house for all prospective students interested in their Master of Public Health Program.  

Click here to Unsubscribe
Click here to view this email online

http://app.streamsend.com/images/templates/1341/blank.gif

http://app.streamsend.com/images/templates/1341/top.gif

 

http://app.streamsend.com/images/templates/1341/blank.gif

http://app.streamsend.com/images/templates/1341/blank.gif

http://app.streamsend.com/images/templates/1341/blank.gif

 

http://app.streamsend.com/images/templates/1341/blank.gif

http://production-streamsend.ezpublishing.netdna-cdn.com/assets/402435/images/phgp-cmyk-300px-9392484070c9721d78721cd69b9997f7.png

http://app.streamsend.com/images/templates/1341/blank.gif

http://production-streamsend.ezpublishing.netdna-cdn.com/assets/templates/1341/ico-facebook-adbb0f49bf9fbf98a22b42652a05dbb4.gif

http://production-streamsend.ezpublishing.netdna-cdn.com/assets/templates/1341/ico-twitter-86102c8e8914dfcbfa0b6d3bb345f652.gif

http://production-streamsend.ezpublishing.netdna-cdn.com/assets/templates/1341/ico-linkedin-e1a931b116778e9fc2cede1555b42064.gif

http://app.streamsend.com/images/templates/1341/blank.gif

http://app.streamsend.com/images/templates/1341/content-separator.gif

http://app.streamsend.com/images/templates/1341/blank.gif

http://app.streamsend.com/images/templates/1341/blank.gif

http://app.streamsend.com/images/templates/1341/blank.gif

OPEN HOUSE: April 10 3:30pm

http://app.streamsend.com/images/templates/1341/blank.gif

1120 NW 14th St, 10th Floor, Miami, FL 33136

 

On April 10th, we will host an open house for all prospective students to our Master of Public Health Program.

 

Join us and meet with our students and faculty to learn more about our excellent MPH program and all it has to offer. 

 

If you will be traveling to Miami, we are happy to make recommendations for your stay.

 

Please RSVP to matthew.brandon@miami.edu

Links

http://app.streamsend.com/images/templates/1341/blank.gif

How to Apply
Programs
Faculty
Research
International Exp.
Contacts

 

http://app.streamsend.com/images/templates/1341/blank.gif

 

http://app.streamsend.com/images/templates/1341/content-separator.gif

http://app.streamsend.com/images/templates/1341/blank.gif

Video: University of Miami - Public Health
Programs

http://app.streamsend.com/images/templates/1341/blank.gif

 

http://app.streamsend.com/images/templates/1341/bottom.gif

http://app.streamsend.com/images/templates/1341/blank.gif

 

4.  The Association of Schools and Colleges of Optometry (ASCO) announces a FREE Optometry Virtual Fair on April 17, 2014.   

 

 

Register Now to attend the FREE Optometry Virtual Fair on April 17, 2014
Save precious time and find out which Doctor of Optometry Program is best for you!


cid:image004.jpg@01CF4829.E1AB1B60

 

 

Paige Pence

Director, Student and Residency Affairs

Association of Schools and Colleges of Optometry

6110 Executive Boulevard, Suite 420

Rockville, MD  20852

Phone:  (404) 545-6159

Email:  ppence@opted.org

Website:  www.opted.org

cid:image001.png@01CF4829.E1AB1B60cid:image002.png@01CF4829.E1AB1B60 cid:image003.png@01CF4829.E1AB1B60

 

 

5.  The National Society for Nontraditional Premedical and Medical Students announces its 14th OldPreMeds and OldMeds National Conference, June 5-8, 2014 in Washington, DC.  

 

This email is a paid announcement being sent as a service to the National Society for Nontraditional Premedical & Medical Students.  Please direct your inquiries to them.

 

 

http://ih.constantcontact.com/fs134/1105132857422/img/424.jpg

 

 

 This Year's Theme: The Medical School Application Process 

 

(please distribute to students in your program)

 

 

Speakers and Presenters

 

Michelle Whitehurst-Cook, MD
   Associate Professor of Family Medicine
   Associate Dean for Admissions
   Virginia Commonwealth University School of Medicine

 

 Anita Showalter, DO, FACOOG (D)
   Assistant Dean of Clinical Education
   Associate Professor and Chair, Womens Health
   Pacific Northwest University of Health Sciences

 

Rebecca Rice, MSB
   Manager, MCAT 2015 Outreach and Communication
   Association of American Medical Colleges (AAMC)

 

Patrick I. Brown, PhD

   Director, Dept Sciences, Mathematics & Biotechnology
   University of California, Berkeley Extension
   former Associate Dean of Student Affairs 
   Joan C. Edwards School of Medicine at Marshall University

 

Judy Colwell, MA 
   former Assistant Director of Admissions 
   Stanford University School of Medicine

 

Diane McQuail, MA 
   Assistant Dean for Admissions
   George Washington University School of Medicine

 

Patricia A. Gwirtz, PhD, FACC

   Assistant Dean, Graduate School of Biomedical Science
   Professor, Department of Integrative Physiology 
   University of North Texas Health Science Center

 

Liza Thompson, M.Ed. 
   former Director 
   Johns Hopkins Post-Baccalaureate Premedical Program
   Goucher Post-Baccalaureate Premedical Program

 

Anne M. Snyder, MSA
   Admissions Counselor
   Michigan State University
   College of Osteopathic Medicine

 

 

 

Early Registration for the conference is only:

 

$79.00 paid by May 4th 2014 11:59PM (EDT)
$36.00 for spouses/significant others; children under 16 free

 

Hotel Room Rates $99 a night for reservations made by May 4
Reserve a room online    Or Call    888-294-5059 code OLD

   

 

Click here for complete program, hotel, and registration information 

 

 

 

Download the Conference Flyer HERE

 

 

Forward this email

http://img.constantcontact.com/letters/images/SafeUnsubscribe_Footer_Logo_New.png

http://img.constantcontact.com/letters/images/CC_Footer_Logo_New.png

This email was sent to seisen@cbu.edu by tsands@naahp.org |  

Instant removal with SafeUnsubscribe| Privacy Policy.

NAAHP, Inc. | 108 Hessel Blvd. | Suite 101 | Champaign | IL | 61820-6596

 

6.  The Association of American Veterinary Medical Colleges announces its VetSchool Student Engagement System, which will facilitate targeted newsletters and other information specific to the category (High School, Undergraduates, Pre-Vets, Applicants, Advisors and parents) they assign when signing up.  

cid:image003.jpg@01CF48F9.E2696BD0

 

The Association of American Veterinary Medical Colleges is pleased to announce that the VetSchool Student Engagement System (VSES) is now live. While still in its infancy, the program will automate targeted newsletters and other information specific to the category they assign when signing up. High School, Undergraduates, Pre-Vets, Applicants, Advisors and Parents are among the first groups to be included in this system. Future iterations of the system will allow pre-applicants to request information from any of the AAVMC member institutions and automatically feed these requests directly to our school recruitment / admissions offices.

 

Monthly content will begin flowing out of AAVMC in May 2014, but the system is now taking subscriptions.

 

For more information on the system, or to sign up please go to: http://aavmc.org/vses.aspx or you may email: vetschools@aavmc.org.

 

Thanks,

 

Tony Wynne

Director of Admissions & Recruitment Affairs

Association of American Veterinary Medical Colleges

The Veterinary Medical College Application Service

1101 Vermont Avenue NW, Suite 301

Washington, DC  20005-3536

O:  202-371-9195, ext. 124

twynne@aavmc.org

www.aavmc.org

 

 

7.  Students virtually dissect hologram-like 3-D cadaver, from R&D Daily.  

The link for this article is http://www.rdmag.com/news/2014/03/students-virtually-dissect-hologram-3-d-cadaver :


Dental residents virtually dissect this 3D cadaver, which is anatomically correct. Image: Laura Bailey
Dental residents virtually dissect this 3D cadaver, which is anatomically correct. Image: Laura Bailey

 

The 3-D virtual reality cadaver floats in space like a hologram on an invisible gurney.

Univ. of Michigan 3-D Lab employee Sean Petty stands a few inches away. Petty wears special glasses and pilots a joystick to arbitrarily slice away sections of the cadaver. He enlarges and turns the body for a better view of the detailed anatomy inside.

Alexandre DaSilva, asst. prof. at the Univ. of Michigan School of Dentistry, called the virtual reality cadaver the opportunity of a lifetime for himself and for his dental students, residents and doctoral students working with the technology.

"The first time I saw the technology I almost cried," said DaSilva, who also heads the Headache and Orofacial Pain Effort at the Univ. of Michigan Dentistry and the Molecular and Behavioral Neuroscience Institute. "In my wildest dream, I never thought that this would be possible."

The 3-D model supplements traditional anatomy class in several ways, DaSilva said. For instance, the residents can back up and redo cuts, and also enlarge areas to see them more closely.

"When you really immerse in the 3-D image, you can use all your senses," said Thiago Nascimento, a postdoctoral student in DaSilva's research laboratory. "It blew my mind."

Researchers at the Univ. of Michigan Medical School Visible Human Project had already layered the cadaver into very thin sections. The group shared the anatomical data with Petty and 3-D Lab colleague Theodore Hall. The two then wrote the code that reassembled the body into a computer model, said Eric Maslowski, manager of the 3-D Lab, which is part of the Digital Media Commons, a service of the library.

Maslowski said that other disciplines such as engineering or natural science can use the technology to virtually dissect simulated hurricanes or slice into Mastodons, for example. DaSilva uses it now to study 3-D brains of pain patients to learn about migraine and other disorders.

Source: Univ. of Michigan

 

 

8.  Lincoln Memorial University offers a Master’s Degree with four concentrations:  Anatomical Sciences, Biomedical Professions, Life Science Research, and Life Science Teaching.  

http://ih.constantcontact.com/fs134/1105132857422/img/428.png

 

With the academic year nearing completion, you know many graduating students are realizing that they lack the strong portfolio needed in order to gain admittance to their professional or graduate school of choice.  

 

Lincoln Memorial University can provide them with the tools they need to overcome admissions barriers, strengthen their academic record and be accepted into their chosen program.

 

Some things you might not know about Lincoln Memorial University (LMU).....

  • A small private university, nestled in the Appalachian Mountains and listed for two consecutive years in US News and World Report as one of the top ten "Up and Coming Universities."
  • A Master of Science degree program that consistently has 75% placement rate of students into medical school.*
  • An osteopathic medical school on-campus located just a short distance from where Osteopathic medicine was founded by A.T. Still in 1874.

Our Master of Science (MS) program has four concentrations:

 

Anatomical Sciences & Biomedical Professions

https://imgssl.constantcontact.com/letters/images/1101101060094/hisp-event1-bcrnr.gif

For the student who aspires to attend medical school, the Anatomical Sciences (AS) and Biomedical Professions (BS) programs allow them to not only acquire a graduate degree - each of these 30 graduate hour programs also provide the student with a stepping stone to making their medical school dreams a reality. Courses offered include science-focused graduate classes along with classes such as Medical Gross Anatomy at LMU's DeBusk College of Osteopathic Medicine (DCOM). Masters students will be working alongside first year medical school students in these crucial courses and have the potential of earning 15.5 medical school credits while enrolled in the MS programs. Students who maintain a minimum 3.0 GPA during the fall semester are guaranteed an interview at the DCOM. Thus far 77% of our current MS students have earned conditional acceptance in to LMU's medical school for the 2014 fall semester. The condition is successful completion of spring courses.

 

 

Life Science Research

https://imgssl.constantcontact.com/letters/images/1101101060094/hisp-event1-bcrnr.gif

Students planning to work toward their doctorate degree in a science related field will benefit greatly from LMU's 30 graduate hour Life Science Research program. Courses that help students learn to read and evaluate the primary scientific literature will be paired with classes that provide students with solid content and skills such as Advanced Biochemistry and Advanced Molecular Genetics & Cell Biology. As one might imagine, research opportunities are a major component of this program. Students work closely with research faculty and peers in LMU's impressive state-of-the-art lab facilities.

 

 

Life Science Teaching

https://imgssl.constantcontact.com/letters/images/1101101060094/hisp-event1-bcrnr.gif

Our Life Science Teaching program offers students with a science related undergraduate experience to earn a graduate degree that will prepare them to teach at a high school or community college level. This program consists of 38 graduate hours and is designed to be feasible for a working adult with courses two nights per week plus one to two Saturdays per month.

 

About Lincoln Memorial University 

https://imgssl.constantcontact.com/letters/images/1101101060094/hisp-event1-bcrnr.gif

Lincoln Memorial University (link) is a private liberal arts institution founded in 1897 and has been listed in US News and World Report as one of the top ten "Up and Coming Universities" in 2013 and 2014. Our campus of over 1,000 acres is nestled in the scenic Appalachian mountains approximately 55 miles north of Knoxville, Tennessee.

Click here for more information. To learn more about Lincoln Memorial University please visit LMUnet.edu.

Feel free to share our information and website with your students. Questions or requests for more information may be directed to Holly Napier at holly.napier@LMUnet.edu or via telephone at 423.869.6027.

"Always bear in mind that your own resolution to succeed is more important than any one thing." Abraham Lincoln

*The Master of Science program was formerly the Post-Baccalaureate Medical Sciences Program (PMSP).

 

9.  Scientists find that 25 gm of Cocoa Powder a Day Keeps the Doctor Away – from the 2014 National Meeting & Exposition of the American Chemical Society, Dallas. 

25 gm of Cocoa Powder a Day Keeps the Doctor Away

Mon, 03/24/14 - 08:23

The health benefits of dark chocolate have long been touted, but new research presented at last week’s meeting of the American Chemical Society in Dallas finally explains why.

Researchers showed that certain bacteria in the stomach consume the chocolate and produce anti-inflammatory compounds beneficial to the heart. When these compounds decrease inflammation in the cardiovascular tissue, it also reduces the long-term risk of stroke.

It’s well known that cocoa products contain plenty of naturally-occurring antioxidants, but this study is the first to clarify what happens when they enter the lower gastrointestinal tract.

“The cocoa powder polyphenolic polymers and fiber are changed by bacteria in the colon to produce smaller molecules, which enter the bloodstream and protect the cardiovascular tissue,” says lead researcher John W. Finley, PhD, professor of Food Science and director of Food Innovation at Louisiana State University in Baton Rouge, La.

Finley and colleagues tested three cocoa powders using a series of modified test tubes that modeled a human digestive tract and simulated normal digestion. Then, using human fecal bacteria, they subjected the non-digestible materials to anaerobic fermentation.

“We have demonstrated that complex polyphenols and fiber in cocoa powder can be broken down to small molecules that protect cardiovascular tissue and promote colon health,” Finley says.

Cocoa powder contains several antioxidant compounds, such as catechin and epicatechin, as well as a small amount of dietary fiber. Though these components are poorly digested and absorbed, good gut bacteria work on them when they enter the colon.

“It is most likely good to consume 25 gm of cocoa powder per day,” Finley says. “At this point, it is a guess, but it surely will not hurt and could result in some protection of cardiovascular cells against inflammation. The fiber in the cocoa also is good for the health of your colon.”

Once funding is obtained, the researchers plan to conduct clinical trials to validate their model system studies.

Colleen Mullarkey

Reference

Finley J, Moore M, Goita, M. Impact of the microbiome on cocoa polyphenolic compounds. 2014 National Meeting & Exposition of the American Chemical Society, Dallas.

 

 

10.  Marginalia:  Speaking of cocoa (and its derivatives)…  

The annual Chocolate Tasting Session, featuring Dinstuhl’s gourmet chocolates, and hosted by the BIOL 103 class, was held on Monday, March 24. 

 

Anecdotal evidence suggests that men and women have different taste preferences for chocolate, and that women have a stronger preference for dark chocolate. 

 

In order to determine whether whether this assertion can be substantiated, each of 37 attendees was given 3 wafers:  white chocolate, milk chocolate, and dark chocolate.  Ms. Marian Hughes, manager of the Laurelwood Dinstuhl’s location led the group through an orientation of how the cocoa plant is grown, how to pods are harvested, and then how the cocoa butter is separated from the solids.  She then led the group to understand and appreciate the bouquet, sound, and finally, the flavor of each wafer, starting with the white chocolate, and ending with the flavor of each wafer.

 

Here is the lovely Maid Marian Hughes, dispensing valuable information on chocolate:

 

 

 

SRO, (almost) in J-10.  (One attendee had trust issues with the guy holding the camera.):

 

 

This is Solomon Amiri doing his rendition of Santa Claus at Christmastime, handing goodies to all the good girls and boys:

 

 

Remember the sequence:  Bouquet, sound, flavor.  Got that?

 

Alright, first the bouquet:

 

 

Now, the sound:

 

 

Finally, the fla-a-a-a-a-a-a-a-a-avor (AKA “Yup, that was good.”:

 

 

 

Results?  Using a chi-square goodness-of-fit test to compare the responses of men and women (using the percentage of male responses as the “expected” distribution), the results fairly similar results for both men and women, i.e. the differences were NOT significant…but who cares?

 

 

Some people get pretty ecstatic during the event.  (This photo is from 2004.):

 

GodivaSp2008Pic04

 

P.S.  Why chocolate is better than men:

 

20. All the good Chocolate isn’t already taken.

 

19. Chocolate never leaves the seat up.

 

18. Chocolate is easily molded.

 

17. All your friends understand what you see in it.

 

16. Every Chocolate is rich.

 

15. Its sole purpose is to give you pleasure.

 

14. When you’ve had enough Chocolate, you can put it away in its box.

 

13. Chocolate might make you fat, but it can’t make you pregnant.

 

12. You can spot the nutty ones immediately.

 

11. PMS only makes you appreciate it more.

 

10. With Chocolate, you can admit that size really matters.

 

9. You don’t have to go clubbin  to pick up Chocolate.

 

8. Your mother will never say it’s not good enough for you.

 

7. If you and your best friend like the same Chocolate, it’s not a problem.

 

6. Chocolate can be sweet without having ulterior motives.

 

5. You can have more than one Chocolate a day, and nobody will call you a skank.

 

4. You always know where your Chocolate is.

 

3. If you want to make it hard, you just stick it in the fridge.

 

2. With Chocolate, you never have to fake being satisfied!

 

And the #1 Reason Why Chocolate is Better Than  a Man…

1. Chocolate is always there for you when you need it!


From:
http://kisselpaso.com/the-top-reasons-why-chocolate-is-better-than-a-man/?trackback=tsmclip

Dr. Stan Eisen, Director
Preprofessional Health Programs
Biology Department
Christian Brothers University
650 East Parkway South
Memphis, TN 38104
E-mail: seisen@cbu.edu
http://www.cbu.edu/~seisen/
Caduceus Newsletter Archives: http://www.cbu.edu/~seisen/Caduceus.html