Christian Brothers University

www.cbu.edu

Caduceus Newsletter:  Spring 2014.07, Week of February 23.  

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Image from the U.S. Department of Energy Genome Program web site:   http://genomics.energy.gov  

Dr. Stan Eisen, Director
Preprofessional Health Programs
Christian Brothers University

650 East Parkway South
Memphis, TN  38104

Home page:
http://facstaff.cbu.edu/~seisen/ 

Caduceus Newsletter Archives:
http://facstaff.cbu.edu/~seisen/Caduceus.html

 

 

So, you like being outdoors?  How about bringing of that outdoorsy feeling indoors? 

 

 

For more information, please go to Marginalia.

 

Table of Contents:

 

1.  Events coming up.  
2.  The next meeting of the Memphis Pharmacy Interest Group is Tuesday, February 25, 4:30 – 5:30 p.m. at Panera Bread, 4530 Poplar Avenue, Suite 101.  
3. 
With three enrollment periods each year and rolling admissions, Trinity School of Medicine (Saint Vincent & the Grenadines) is currently accepting applications for the May and September 2014 enrollments.   
4.  ===AAMC STAT===, News from the Association of American Medical Colleges, February 17, 2014 issue.  
5.  The February 2014 edition of the University of Tennessee Health Science Center College of Pharmacy Newsletter is now available for review.  
6.  The Church Health Center will be featuring art created by Ms. Yancy Villa-Calvo, who used to work at CBU, at the Wellness Gallery, 1115 Union Avenue. 
7.  The Ohio University Heritage College of Osteopathic Medicine will host a Summer Scholars Program, which will replicate what will be experienced in the first year of medical school at OU-HCOM. 
8.  Des Moines University (IA) is now accepting applications for their 3-week summer Health Professions Advanced Summer Scholars program.  
9.  Wake Forest University student invention could help teach doctors to perform complex, robot-assisted surgeries.  

10.  Marginalia:  So, you like being outdoors?  How about bringing of that outdoorsy feeling indoors with a moss shower mat?    

 

1.  Events coming up.  

·         Thursday, March 20, 9 a.m. to 5 p.m.:  Field Paleontology trip to the Coon Creek Science Center in Henderson County, TN.  It is one of the 10 major fossil deposits in North America, showing late Cretaceous fossils.  Interested students should contact Dr. Stan Eisen, 901-321-3447, or seisen@cbu.edu ;

·         Saturday, April 5, 2014:  The Student National Dental Association of UTHSC (Memphis) have organized an “Impressions” program for April 5, 2014, designed to expose college students to the profession of dentistry by opening the College and allowing prospective students access to their students and faculty in a relaxed setting. 

 

2.  The next meeting of the Memphis Pharmacy Interest Group is Tuesday, February 25, 4:30 – 5:30 p.m. at Panera Bread, 4530 Poplar Avenue, Suite 101.  

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Please Join Us

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Memphis Pharmacy Interest Group Meeting -
Tuesday, Feb. 25, 2014 @ 4:30p - 5:30p

The Memphis Pharmacy Interest Group provides some of the best opportunities for students to get to know each other, faculty, staff and current students on a deeper level and do learn more about the profession!

Join us as we host a Panel Discussion to explore the Dual Degrees (PharmD/MBA and PharmD/PhD) that we offer here at UT College of Pharmacy.

Tuesday, February 25, 2014 @ 4:30p - 5:30p
Panera Bread (Community Room)
4530 Poplar Ave #101 (near Oak Court Mall)
Memphis, TN

Let Us Know If You're Coming!!

RSVP by Feb. 24
E-mail: afinerso@uthsc.edu to confirm your spot (and free Panera)!!!

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881 Madison Ave. | Memphis, TN 38163 US

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3.  With three enrollment periods each year and rolling admissions, Trinity School of Medicine (Saint Vincent & the Grenadines) is currently accepting applications for the May and September 2014 enrollments.   

1 in 4 Physicians in the U.S and Canada are International Medical Graduates

Stan,

Re-Apply and Wait or Consider Alternate MD Routes?
The U.S. Medical School Application cycle for the 2014 Fall enrollment is coming to a close and whether you're applying for the first time or are re-applying after an unsuccessful first try, you may want to consider the options available to stay on your desired timeline if you are not offered admission.  

If your MCAT Score is the issue, rushing a re-take isn't likely to solve your problem. Re-testing the same year aveages a 2 pt increase.  If your GPA is holding you back, there is no quick fix. To impact your GPA you're looking at a two year return to school or one to two years in a post bach or graduate program before you re-apply.

What is your ultimate goal? If it's to gain admission to a U.S. Medical School then do your homework and formulate a strategy to address your areas of weakness understanding that to execute your plan properly may require anywhere from one to three years. If your real goal is to become a Physician, then consider an alternate path to earning your MD, one that does not greatly extend your timeline or tack on debt from additional education costs.  

With three enrollment periods each year and rolling admissions, Trinity is currently accepting applications for the May and September 2014 enrollments. And with an existing AMCAS or AACOMAS application report, the application process is decidedly simple.

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Read the full article on our blog, you may have an options to get back on track sooner than later.   

 

WHY CONSIDER TRINITY?

First-term clinical experience
220-bed hospital affiliation
Formal and comprehensive
USMLE Step 1 preparation

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P.S.  True, the U.S. Admissions office is in Georgia, but the campus is in the Caribbean:

 

4.  ===AAMC STAT===, News from the Association of American Medical Colleges, February 17, 2014 issue.  

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News from the Association of American Medical Colleges

February 17, 2014

• AAMC Joins Hospital Groups Opposing Sequestration Extension
  to Offset Debt Limit Increase
• Study Examines Full-Time Faculty Attrition at Medical Schools
• 2014 Question of the Year Addresses Graduate Medical Education
• PCORI Issues $206 Million in Funding Announcements
• On the Move



AAMC Joins Hospital Groups Opposing Sequestration Extension
to Offset Debt Limit Increase


The Senate approved a bill last week to lift the debt ceiling limit until March 15, 2015. House Speaker John Boehner (R-Ohio) had tried to attach various policy provisions to the debt limit increase, including the creation of a $2.3 billion fund using a one-year extension of the Medicare sequester to help offset the cost of a potential "doc fix." The AAMC joined eight hospital associations in a letter to Congress opposing the extension. Ultimately, the House passed a clean debt limit extension.

After passage of the House bill, attention turned to the Senate where lawmakers proposed restoring $6 billion in military cost-of-living-adjustment reductions, in part, using $2.3 billion in Medicare savings taken from physician payment reform legislation or another sustainable growth rate formula patch, such as those scheduled for April 1. The groups quickly sent a letter to the Senate stressing that “While we do not oppose the repeal of the reduction in the cost-of living adjustment for military retirees, we do oppose using Medicare reductions to pay for non-Medicare related spending.”


Study Examines Full-Time Faculty Attrition at Medical Schools

Of the assistant and associate professors who started their new appointments at an institution in 2000, assistant professors left more quickly than associate professors, according to a finding in the latest AAMC Analysis in Brief. The study also found that while comparable to men in terms of years of retention, women at the associate professor level tended to leave at a slower pace and that faculty in clinical departments left more quickly than those in basic science departments. With this examination of medical school faculty attrition statistics, which evaluates start date and time of departure in order to make inferences about factors associated with retention, the authors hope the study will provide insight into various policy issues and raise questions of how best to recruit and support junior faculty, as well as mid-career mentoring plans to advance associate professors. To read the full study, visit www.aamc.org/data/aib/.


2014 Question of the Year Addresses Graduate Medical Education

With its 2014 ”Question of the Year,” Academic Medicine is asking, “How can we ensure that our graduate medical education system will prepare trainees for practice in new systems of care delivery?” While particularly interested in ideas from residents and residency program directors, the journal encourages submissions from all members of health care teams, the academic medicine community, as well as members of the public. Responses are due May 1.


PCORI Issues $206 Million in Funding Announcements

The Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Institute (PCORI) recently announced eight funding opportunities for clinical effectiveness research projects, totaling $206 million. Funds are available for programs such as pragmatic clinical studies and large simple trials to evaluate patient-centered outcomes, obesity treatment options for underserved populations, and effectiveness of transitional care services in improving patient outcomes and lowering avoidable readmissions. In addition, PCORI is making up to $81 million available for the spring 2014 funding cycle. Organizations must submit a Letter of Intent by March 7 at 5 p.m. ET. For more information, visit www.pcori.org/apply.


On the Move

Steve Goldschmid, M.D., who has served as dean of the University of Arizona (UA) College of Medicine, Tucson, since July 2009, has been appointed associate vice president for clinical affairs at the Arizona Health Sciences Center, effective March 3. Joe G.N. “Skip” Garcia, M.D., UA senior vice president for health sciences, will serve as interim dean of the College of Medicine. Goldschmid also will serve as vice president of physician services for the University of Arizona Health Network.
 

 

5.  The February 2014 edition of the University of Tennessee Health Science Center College of Pharmacy Newsletter is now available for review.  

http://www.uthsc.edu/pharmacy/news/newsletters/COP-Feb-2014-Newsletter.pdf

 

Just a few stories you will find in the University of Tennessee College of Pharmacy- February 2014 Newsletter:

 

·         Nature Medicine features Meibohm research

·         AACP Pharmacy Practice Section elects Byrd

·         Kosten Foundation Grant awarded to Chauhan

·         ASPEN New Practitioner Award for Herrera

·         US Department of Defense and CMS feature faculty research

·         Postdoctoral research awards for Khan and Sikander

·         ACPE Board of Directors includes alumni Canaday and Tucker

·         UTCOP remembers alumni Phil Enkema and Tom Sharp

 

 

Angela S. Finerson, PharmD, MBA

881 Madison Avenue, Suite 243

Memphis, TN  38163

Phone: (901) 448-7172

Fax: (901) 448-7053

http://www.uthsc.edu/pharmacy

 

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The University of Tennessee Health Science Center E-mail Confidentiality Disclaimer:

The information in this e-mail may be privileged and confidential, intended only for the use of the addressee(s) above. Any unauthorized use or disclosure of this information is prohibited. If you have received this email by mistake, please delete it and immediately contact the sender.

 

 

6.  The Church Health Center will be featuring art created by Ms. Yancy Villa-Calvo, who used to work at CBU, at the Wellness Gallery, 1115 Union Avenue. 

Church Health Cetner logo

  Yancy Villa-Calvo 

"What Shadow Are you Leaving?" 

 

Church Health Center Wellness Gallery

1115 Union Ave.


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Dar a luz ("giving light") refers to giving birth in Spanish. But light does not exist alone. Where there is light, there is also shadow.

In her new series, What shadow are you leaving?, Mexican-born artist Yancy Villa-Calvo reflects on the shadow provoked as a result of time spent with one' children.

In her usual impressionist-semi abstract style, the Memphis mother of three captures corresponding moments of love and pain, safety and fear, hope and uncertainty that are so much part of raising children. With vivid colors and contrasts, Villa-Calvo portraits everyday moments of parents, grandparents, uncles and friends with children that leave a shadow. As the journey of life continues, those shadows intensify or diminish, but remain forever as our legacy. Using mixed media and applying layers of paint and texture, the artist reminds us of how diverse, complex and rich we are.

The exhibit, presented by the Church Health Center, opens to the public on February 21, 2014 (with a reception from 6-8 p.m.) and will last until March 21, 2014. Families are welcome. For more information call 272-0010, ext. 2303.
  

 

 

  

 

 

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Walking as One is a 1.5-mile walk and interactive health fair focused on our Model for Healthy Living. We'll have live music, kids' activities, and hands-on stations about the resources and services the Church Health Center offers to make Memphis healthier.

Form a team and set a fundraising goal! Teams will receive a Model for Healthy Living workbook to use as curriculum to prepare for the event. Walking as One is April 26, 2014 at 2:00 p.m. at Church Health Center Wellness. Register now at walkingasone.org. For more information, contact Jennie Dickerson atdickersonj@churchhealthcenter.org or 901-701-2097.

 

 

  

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1210 Peabody Ave. | Memphis| 901-272-7170
churchhealthcenter.org

 

7.  The Ohio University Heritage College of Osteopathic Medicine will host a Summer Scholars Program, which will replicate what will be experienced in the first year of medical school at OU-HCOM. 

The Ohio University Heritage College of Osteopathic Medicine will again host the Summer Scholars Program. The Summer Scholars program is a tremendous academic experience for underrepresented, or educationally or economically disadvantaged students to grow personally and be challenged professionally on the OU-HCOM campus.  The program replicates what will be experienced in the first year of medical school at OU-HCOM. Courses, taught by OU-HCOM faculty, include gross anatomy (with cadaver dissection), histology, immunology, biochemistry, integrated biomedical sciences,  an introduction to case based learning (CBL), and workshops dealing with the admission process, time management and many other experiences relevant to the medical school experience.

 

The Summer Scholars Program is five weeks in length and includes room and board, a living allowance, travel expenses, and the potential for a guaranteed interview for the entering class at the medical school. Detailed information, eligibility requirements, and application materials can be obtained by going to the Summer Scholars web site at www.oucom.ohiou.edu/SummerScholars .

 

The deadline for application is March 1, 2014.

 

Please encourage your students to take advantage of this tremendous opportunity. If you have any questions about the program, please do not hesitate to contact the OU-HCOM Office of Admissions at 800-345-1560.

 

Best regards,

 

John

 

John D. Schriner, Ph.D.

Assistant Dean, Admissions

Assistant Professor, Department of Social Medicine

Ohio University Heritage College of Osteopathic Medicine

102 Grosvenor Hall

Athens, Ohio 45701

800-345-1560

www.oucom.ohiou.edu

 

 

8.  Des Moines University (IA) is now accepting applications for their 3-week summer Health Professions Advanced Summer Scholars program.  

Des Moines University is now accepting applications for our 3-week summer Health Professions Advanced Summer Scholars program! Health P.A.S.S. is geared toward rising sophomores and juniors from populations underrepresented in medicine and health care, including under-represented minority, low-income and/or first-generation college students.  The program provides participants with perspectives on what it is like to be a student in osteopathic medicine, podiatric medicine, physical therapy, and physician assistant studies.  DMU covers all costs for participants, including housing, meals, and transportation. Enrollment is limited to 12 students, and applications are due March 1, 2014.

 

If after reviewing the materials, there are any additional questions, please call 515.271.7864 or email healthpass@dmu.edu.

 

Have a great day!!

 

 

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Karen A. Lewis, Ed.D.

Associate Vice President

Enrollment Management

3200 Grand Avenue

Des Moines, Iowa  50312

(515) 271-7498 or (800) 240-2767 Ext. 7498

www.dmu.edu

Connect with DMU

 

 

9.  Wake Forest University student invention could help teach doctors to perform complex, robot-assisted surgeries.  

From:  http://news.wfu.edu/2014/02/03/painting-robot-lends-surgeons-a-hand/

Published:   February 3, 2014

Painting robot lends surgeons a hand

Student invention could help teach doctors to perform complex, robot-assisted surgeries

By Will Ferguson Office of Communications and External Relations

Wake Forest sophomore Tim Lee ('16) demonstrates the robot arm that he has programmed to paint pictures, in Huffman Residence Hall on Friday, January 24, 2014.

Wake Forest sophomore Tim Lee ('16) demonstrates the robot arm that he has programmed to paint pictures, in Huffman Residence Hall on Friday, January 24, 2014.

Would you let an artist perform life-saving surgery on you?

You might someday, if the artist is a painting robot.

Timothy Lee built a robotic painting arm that can replicate the lines and shapes a surgeon makes with a scalpel using a paintbrush and canvas. His invention, a creative blend of art and science, could one day lend doctors a hand in practicing complex, robot-assisted surgeries without having to step foot in an operating room.

Rethinking robotics

Lee, a sophomore who plans to major in chemistry, spent his high school years building everything from a robot that can balance on a beam to a robotic arm that can throw a ball. During his first year at Wake Forest, he heard about a percussion-playing robot designed by Georgia Tech researchers and started thinking about new ways to apply his hobby.

“I never really thought you could do music with robots,” he said. “That got me thinking, ‘What else can you do with robots that most people wouldn’t think about or imagine happening?’ I thought I could do something with painting and that prompted the idea of robotic surgery.”

Lee said painting and surgery have more in common than initially meets the eye. A painter has to be nimble and precise with his brushstrokes much like a surgeon must be nimble and precise with a scalpel.

“When you are dissecting a part of the human body, you have to be one hundred percent perfect,” he said. “If you think about painting something like the Mona Lisa, you have to be perfect with your brush.”

With the support of a grant from the Undergraduate Research and Creative Activities (URECA) Center, Lee teamed up with Craig Hamilton, an associate professor of biomedical engineering at Wake Forest Baptist Medical Center, and got to work on his mechanical arm.

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More than painting by numbers

Lee ordered parts online and assembled his contraption. His invention took an artistic turn when he began the arduous process of teaching it how to paint.

“It is a lot harder than you might think,” Lee said. “At first I’d tell it to go five spaces to the left or five spaces to the right and things typically wouldn’t go as planned. After weeks of programming, I eventually got to the point where the robot could paint shapes and lines in a particular color.”

Lee said from there it was relatively easy to train the robot to paint something like a sunset or a house without any input from a human operator. Lee next began to teach the robot to paint lines and shapes corresponding to locations of human organs.

“Our goal was to get the robot to replicate the lines and shapes a surgeon makes with a scalpel all on its own,” he said. “You can think of a painting canvas as a body and the brush as a surgeon’s knife.”

Practicing in a surgeon’s studio

Currently, surgical robots are controlled by a human operator and do not perform procedures autonomously. While Lee’s robot may never be put to work in an operating room, it and other robots like it could one day help researchers to design fully autonomous robotic surgeons.

In addition to teaching the robot to paint autonomously, Lee also explored the idea of using his robot as a training tool for surgeons who need practice operating a da Vinci surgical arm.

“At the Wake Forest Medical Center, doctors use replica bodies to help train surgeons to use the da Vinci system,” Lee said. “These replicas are pretty expensive compared to my robotic arm, which cost around $1,500.”

This April, Lee will represent Wake Forest at the ACC Meeting of the Minds, an event where outstanding undergraduate researchers from each ACC university gather at one member university to present their research, either verbally or as a poster. This year the event will take place at the University of Pittsburgh, where Lee will demonstrate his robot’s painting abilities.

“Working with Dr. Hamilton on my robot has been a great opportunity and there are definitely still a lot of things we can still learn from it,” Lee said. “It just goes to show you that science and art are more intertwined than most people think.”

 

 

10.  Marginalia:  So, you like being outdoors?  How about bringing of that outdoorsy feeling indoors with a moss shower mat?    

Learn how to make your own here: http://bit.ly/MwRGFx

Photo: Learn how to make your own here: http://bit.ly/MwRGFx

 

 

Interested?  Here are the instructions from the above-mentioned URL:

 

How-To: Moss Shower Mat

February 18, 2014 | by Lisa Winter

http://www.iflscience.com/sites/www.iflscience.com/files/styles/ifls_large/public/blog/%5Bnid%5D/moss%20rug.jpg?itok=YH5JOb2Vphoto credit: Robert Brenner, Sr.

Arguably, taking that first step out of the shower is one of the lowest points of the day. It is possible to make that transition from “insanely comfortable shower time” to “everything else you absolutely have to do with your life” a little easier by stepping out onto a lush, comfortable shower mat covered in moss. These mats are commercially available, but are still on the pricey side. If you don’t have that kind of extra money and/or want a fun weekendproject

, here’s how to get it for a lot less:Here’s what you’ll need:

·         -Substrate for the moss, such as high density foam, about 2.54 cm (1 inch) thick

·         -Sharp utility knife

·         -Silicone sealer, like caulk or cement

·         -Posterboard or cardstock for creating stencils

·         -Marker or grease pencil

·         -Spray bottle filled with water

·         -Moss (many kinds of moss can be used, just choose yours based on the amount of sunlight and average temperature of your bathroom)

Here’s how to do it:

·         -Choose the size of your mat. This can be as large or small as you need it to be, given the size of your bathroom. If using foam, be sure that you have enough to make two layers. Bamboo or wood trays will not work quite as well, given their tendency to produce mold and mildew under the conditions required to keep the moss alive.

·         -Choose the shape of your mat. You will need to create several cutouts for your moss. The shape of the cutouts and the edge of the mat are entirely up to you! Any shaping of the edges will need to be done to both pieces of foam, but the cutouts for the moss will only be on the top layer. Use the marker or grease pencil to trace the shapes onto the foam and use the utility knife to cut through the entire thickness. Use as many as you need to cover the mat with moss. Keeping small sections (as opposed to filling a tray with moss) will prevent it from growing excessively.

·         -Seal the mat. An adhesive like silicone caulk is recommended, because it will create a water-tight environment for the moss. Using a product like hot glue or certain other adhesives may melt the foam. Apply the adhesive to the underside of the top layer with the cutouts, making sure each section and the edge of the mat will be properly sealed. Press the top layer to the bottom layer, cleaning up any excess that may have squeezed out the sides. Use books or something heavy to weigh down the mat until the adhesive has dried.

·         -Prep the mat. Once the mat is ready for the moss, it will need to be properly prepped to ensure its survival. Use the spray bottle to mist the surface of the mat. Keep the spray bottle handy in the bathroom while the moss gets established.

·         -Plant the moss. Insert the moss into each cutout, until the mat is covered.

Depending on what species of moss you have used, you might need to water it more than just the drips from your shower once a day. Use the spray bottle to mist the moss for the first couple of months while it gets established. This will keep it moist without over-saturating it.

 

Dr. Stan Eisen, Director
Preprofessional Health Programs
Biology Department
Christian Brothers University
650 East Parkway South
Memphis, TN 38104
E-mail: seisen@cbu.edu
http://www.cbu.edu/~seisen/
Caduceus Newsletter Archives: http://www.cbu.edu/~seisen/Caduceus.html