Christian Brothers University

www.cbu.edu

Caduceus Newsletter:  Spring 2014.02, Week of January 20

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Image from the U.S. Department of Energy Genome Program web site:   http://genomics.energy.gov  

Dr. Stan Eisen, Director
Preprofessional Health Programs
Christian Brothers University

650 East Parkway South
Memphis, TN  38104

Home page:
http://facstaff.cbu.edu/~seisen/ 

Caduceus Newsletter Archives:
http://facstaff.cbu.edu/~seisen/Caduceus.html

 

 

Humans, like all other creatures, adapt to the colder temperatures of boreal ranges of the world:

 

cid:4.1760708715@web162005.mail.bf1.yahoo.com

 

For more views of the wonderfulness of life in Canada, please go to Marginalia. 

 

Table of Contents:

 

1.  Indiana University offers a Summer Research Experience for Undergraduates (REU) in Animal Behavior.  
2.  The Tufts University Cummings School of Veterinary Medicine offers a 2014 Adventures in Veterinary Medicine program for individuals considering a career in veterinary medicine. 
3.  The National Institutes of Health (NIH) is launching a series of programs to develop approaches to engage researchers, especially from backgrounds underrepresented in biomedical sciences, and prepare them to thrive in NIH-funded research careers.  
4.  Syracuse University (NY) offers graduate programs in forensic and national security sciences.  
5.  Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine offers a summer course in human anatomy for undergraduates, June 2 – June 27, 2014.  Deadline for submitting application materials is March 31, 2014.  
6.  The William Carey University College of Osteopathic Medicine (Hattiesburg, MS) uses a community-based training model. 
7.  The William Carey University College of Osteopathic Medicine offers a Master of Biomedical Science Degree Program.  
8.  The U.S. Air Force offers a Scholarship Program for medical students enrolled in either allopathic (MD) or osteopathic (DO) medical schools.  
9.  The Trinity School of Medicine, located in Kingstown, capital of St. Vincent and the Grenadines, offers a U.S.-based model of medical education. 
10.  From Medscape.com -- Optometrists, Ophthalmologists Announce First Collaborative Effort.
      
11.  The University of Tennessee Health Science Center (Memphis) Establishes a New Master’s Degree Program in Laboratory Research and Management.  
12.  ===AAMC STAT===, News from the Association of American Medical Colleges, January 13, 2014 edition.   
13.  Resources are available for Native Americans interested in healthcare professions.   
14. International Service Learning (ISL) offers 9-day global health opportunities over Spring Break.   
15.  St. George’s University (Grenada, West Indies) is offering a series of Information Sessions. 

16.  Marginalia:  Meanwhile, in Canada   

 

1.  Indiana University offers a Summer Research Experience for Undergraduates (REU) in Animal Behavior.  

Indiana University (Bloomington) Summer Research Experience for Undergraduates

May 19 - July 26, 2014

The REU program in Animal Behavior brings about 10 undergraduate students to Indiana University each summer to engage in animal behavior research. Located in the heart of Bloomington, IU is a Big Ten university with a national reputation for research in the sciences. The city is nestled in the hilly, wooded countryside of southern Indiana near local lakes, state parks, and the Hoosier National Forest. It is conveniently located one hour south of Indianapolis (home of the Indy 500, the Colts and the Pacers, and the largest children's museum in the US), 2.5 hours from Cincinnati, and 4 hours from Chicago. The area offers a variety of outdoor activities including biking, boating, caving, camping and hiking, as well as a rich cultural life of music, museums, and restaurants. An extensive public bus system can take you anywhere you want to go.

Funded by the National Science Foundation, our program offers a unique opportunity for talented undergraduates to do state-of-the-art research and gain valuable skills while exploring career opportunities in the sciences. During the first two weeks, interns divide their time between group training activities and their home laboratories. The group training activities include research seminar presentations, hands-on training in field and laboratory techniques, a trip behind the scenes at the Indianapolis Zoo, and a workshop on research ethics. For the remainder of the summer, students conduct individual research projects under the guidance of their mentors and prepare final presentations of the results. We also offer brief workshops on taking the GRE, applying to graduate school, and designing professional presentations in Power Point.

Our program has been running since 1990 and is one of the most successful undergraduate summer research programs in the country. Explore the links to the left for more information.

Apply online before February 11, 2014

 

 

2.  The Tufts University Cummings School of Veterinary Medicine offers a 2014 Adventures in Veterinary Medicine program for individuals considering a career in veterinary medicine. 

 

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Adventures in Veterinary Medicine

 

 

Dear College Advisor:

 

We are pleased to announce that we are now accepting applications for the 2014 Adventures in Veterinary Medicine (AVM) program at Tufts University Cummings School of Veterinary Medicine.

 

AVM is an exciting and intensive program where participants can explore the wide variety of careers available within veterinary medicine and discover first-hand what it is like to attend veterinary school.

 

For students who are trying to determine whether veterinary medicine is the right career path, AVM is a great way to gain a deeper understanding of the profession. The program is also helpful for students who have already decided on a future in veterinary medicine, as it allows them to experience life as a veterinary student and explore opportunities within the field. Many of our past AVM participants have successfully gained admission to veterinary school both here at Tufts and at other schools.

 

During the week-long session, participants will

·         investigate the different specialty fields

·         spend time behind the scenes in our hospitals shadowing veterinary students

·         gain hands-on experience working with our teaching animals

·         learn about our admission and financial aid process

·         and more!

 

We offer two sessions for college students as well as a session for adult, non-traditional students.

            Adult Session 2:         May 5–9

            College Session 3:      June 2–6

            College Session 4:      June 9-13

 

Full details, including eligibility, tuition, and the online application, can be found on our website at vet.tufts.edu/avm.

 

We hope that you will share this information with your students and with any other appropriate departments at your institution. If you or your students have any questions, please feel free to contact us at AVM@tufts.edu or 508-839-7962.

 

 

3.  The National Institutes of Health (NIH) is launching a series of programs to develop approaches to engage researchers, especially from backgrounds underrepresented in biomedical sciences, and prepare them to thrive in NIH-funded research careers.  

NIH Announces New FOAs for "Enhancing the Diversity of the NIH-Funded Workforce" Program

TA Call to be held Tomorrow, January 14, Noon - 4:15 PM EST

 

(January 13, 2014)  The National Institutes of Health (NIH) recently released three new funding opportunity announcements (FOAs) to develop approaches to engage researchers, especially from backgrounds underrepresented in biomedical sciences, and prepare them to thrive in NIH-funded research careers.  Please note that only one application per institution per initiative will be accepted.

Important Dates and Deadlines

  • January 14, 2014, 12:00 PM - 4:15 PM EST – technical assistance (TA) webinar
    • For more information and to register, please click here.  If you cannot attend the live webinar, an archived recording will be posted several weeks after the webinar here.
  • March 2, 2014 – letters of intent due for each initiative
  • April 2, 2014 – applications due for each initiative

The funding through the Enhancing the Diversity of the NIH-Funded Workforce Program will establish a national consortium to develop, implement, and evaluate approaches to encourage individuals to start and stay in biomedical research careers.  The new FOAs provide the opportunity for transformation of the biomedical research workforce pipeline through institution-wide, and eventually nationwide, implementation of successful training and mentoring strategies.

The FOAs will establish a consortium of awardees from three integrated initiatives.  Awardees will collectively determine hallmarks of success, including core competencies, at each phase of the biomedical career pathway and develop complementary training and mentoring approaches to enable young scientists to meet these hallmarks.  Awardees will also test the efficacy of these approaches, and provide flexibility to adjust approaches during the course of the program to maximize impact.  The consortium will disseminate lessons learned so that effective approaches can be adopted by other institutions across the nation.

  • The National Research Mentoring Network (NRMN):  The NRMN will be a nationwide network of mentors and mentees spanning all disciplines relevant to the NIH mission.  The NRMN will address the critical need for increased access to high quality research mentorship and networking opportunities by establishing an interconnected set of skilled mentors linked to mentees across the country.  The NRMN will also develop best practices for mentoring, provide training opportunities for mentors, and provide professional opportunities for mentees.  The goals for mentoring at each career phase will align with the hallmarks of success to be established by the consortium.
  • Building Infrastructure Leading to Diversity (BUILD):  BUILD will provide support for relatively under-resourced institutions with high concentrations of students from disadvantaged backgrounds to implement transformative approaches to the training of students to undertake biomedical and behavioral research.  These approaches will emphasize research opportunities for students, along with additional innovative activities, to enable students to achieve the hallmarks of success at each phase.  Awardee institutions will be encouraged to partner with research-intensive institutions to expand research opportunities for their students, to foster networking, and to enrich the training experiences available to students at both institutions.
  • The Coordination and Evaluation Center (CEC):  The CEC will coordinate consortium-wide activities and assess efficacy of the training and mentoring approaches developed by the BUILD and NRMN awardees.  The CEC will develop both short- and long-term measures of efficacy, allowing the consortium to continuously gather data and respond accordingly.  The CEC will also serve as the focal point for dissemination, sharing consortium progress and lessons learned with the broader biomedical research training and mentoring communities.

The program is expected to fund up to 10 BUILD primary institutions, one NRMN and one CEC, contingent upon the availability of funds and receipt of a sufficient number of meritorious applications.  Additional information, including important eligibility criteria for applicant institutions and organizations, can be found in each FOA.

The Enhancing the Diversity of the NIH-Funded Workforce program is funded through the NIH Common Fund, and managed by the National Institute on Minority Health and Health Disparities in partnership with the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute.

The NIH Common Fund encourages collaboration and supports a series of exceptionally high-impact, trans-NIH programs. Common Fund programs are designed to pursue major opportunities and gaps in biomedical research that no single NIH Institute or Center could tackle alone, but that the agency as a whole can address to make the biggest impact possible on the progress of medical research. Additional information about the NIH Common Fund can be found at http://commonfund.nih.gov.

 

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4.  Syracuse University (NY) offers graduate programs in forensic and national security sciences.  

 

5.  Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine offers a summer course in human anatomy for undergraduates, June 2 – June 27, 2014.  Deadline for submitting application materials is March 31, 2014.  

 

6.  The William Carey University College of Osteopathic Medicine (Hattiesburg, MS) uses a community-based training model. 

 

7.  The William Carey University College of Osteopathic Medicine offers a Master of Biomedical Science Degree Program.  

 

8.  The U.S. Air Force offers a Scholarship Program for medical students enrolled in either allopathic (MD) or osteopathic (DO) medical schools.  

 

 

 

AIR FORCE HEALTH PROFESSIONS SCHOLARSHIP PROGRAM (HPSP) FACTS

 

 

SCHOLARSHIPS OFFERED: 2, 3 or 4-year periods.  Candidates are expected to follow a schedule leading directly to a Doctor of Medicine (MD) or Doctor of Osteopathy (DO).

 

SCHOLARSHIPS COVER:  Full tuition and all required fees such as textbooks, small equipment, supplies needed for classes, and a monthly living allowance.

 

 

STIPEND (monthly living allowance):  Currently $2,158 per month x 11 months = $23,738.00 annually. Monthly stipends are split and paid twice monthly usually on the 15th and 30th of each month.

 

BONUS:  $20,000 onetime bonus paid to you during your first month of sponsorship to use as you please.

 

COMMITMENT:  1 FOR 1 (example:  4 year scholarship requires a 4 year active duty commitment) Applicants selected will also be required to complete a 45-day clerkship annually.  During such time the monthly stipend will stop and you will receive commissioned officer active duty pay:

 

     Round trip travel between university and training site is provided by Air Force.

 

      During clerkship your dependents (wife, husband, children) will be authorized to use Armed Forces TRICARE health care facilities, base

 

       Exchanges/commissaries, and other base facilities/activities.

 

REQUIREMENTS AFTER GRADUATION:  RESIDENCY is required.  This can be done at a civilian institution or an Air Force facility.  Like civilian organizations, the Air Force selects the best qualified candidates for each type of residency.  Needs of the Air Force come first.  Graduates of our residency programs have consistently ranked in the top 17th percentile on initial board exams in every training area we provide.

 

***Residency does not count toward your active duty commitment.

 

***You will not be taken from your residencies to go active duty General Medical Officers.  You will need to complete your residency         requirements in full in order to become an active duty Air Force Officer.

 

ENTRY GRADE:  HPSP graduates will enter active duty in the rank of Captain (0-3)

 

SELECTION PROCESS:  Applicant submits an application through the local Air Force Health Professions recruiter.  The selection board evaluates each application based on the "whole person" concept, awarding points in the following areas:

 

-        Undergraduate GPA and school attended

 

-        Medical College Admission Test (MCAT) score

 

-        Work experiences (example:  full/part time, direct patient care, research employment, etc.)

 

-        Extracurricular activities  (sports, clubs, professional organizations, community involvement)

 

-        Letters of reference  (VERY IMPORTANT)

 

WHY ME?  WHY NOT?  Serving your country while bettering yourself is the greatest honor a person can know.  The patriotic spirits that founded the democratic freedoms we enjoy today are all but gone.  Everyone seems to have the mind set of  "The military is not for me, let someone else do it," or "What's in it for me?"  Some of us must step to the front and do what others can't or won't do.  You have the opportunity to serve your country and at the same time gain a very valuable medical education, at our expense. You'll be able to practice medicine the way it's meant to be, without insurance restrictions, fear of constant malpractice lawsuits, payrolls, hassles of hiring and firing employees, facilities overhead, too many or too few patients, and many other obstacles the private sector must deal with.  Our doctors can concentrate on their patient's well-being.

 

//SIGNED//

 

Jacob R Brandis, TSgt, USAF

Health Professions Recruiter

342nd Air Force Recruiting Squadron

331 Salem Place, Ste 250

Fairview Heights, IL 62208

Cell: 618-402-8491

Office: 618-624-3795

Fax: 618-624-6641

Jacob.brandis@us.af.mil

 

 

 

9.  The Trinity School of Medicine, located in Kingstown, capital of St. Vincent and the Grenadines, offers a U.S.-based model of medical education. 

What, you don’t know where St. Vincent and the Grenadines is?  It’s ~1,500 miles from Miami, FL.

 

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Stan,
A Different Path Doesn't have to be a Detour or Dead End
When we interview Applicants and ask them why they chose to apply to Trinity School of Medicine it's usually for the factors that differentiate our MD program from other Caribbean medical schools: class sizes that are relatively small (from 25-75 depending on the term); clinical experience at our affiliated teaching hospital that starts in your first term; and the experienced leadership in our Dean, Dr. Skelton.

>>Read the full blog article on Charting Outcomes

From the outset, decisions were made to structure the MD program to closely resemble the U.S. curriculum and to establish clinical rotations in the U.S. with the right affiliations to set our students up for success.

Over the course of the last 12 months, changes have been implemented to the 5th term curriculum that puts greater focus on preparing students for the USMLE Step 1 exam and the results support the new format.

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As one of the few, if not only Caribbean medical school to be led by a former U.S. medical school Dean, Dr. Skelton has helped to establish Trinity's strong academics, retained experienced faculty and encouraged the limits on class size to maintain Trinity's tightly knit community. With this foundation, Trinity students have achieved results on par with U.S. medical school students when it comes to passing Step 1 on the first attempt. This goes to show that following a path that may lead you out of the U.S. or Canada for a short time, doesn't mean a detour or dead end to your medical education.

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Due to the limited seats in medical schools in their home country, U.S. and Canadian citizens chose to go abroad for the short term to ultimately achieve their long term goal. Many of those students are now well on their way to becoming licensed physicians in North America, having successfully participated in the National Residency Matching Program and Canadian Resident Match Program.

Find more details on the successful outcomes of Trinity MD Students in the full article

WHY CONSIDER TRINITY?

First-term clinical experience
220-bed hospital affiliation
Formal and comprehensive
USMLE Step 1 preparation

http://www.trinityschoolofmedicine.org/images/kat_j.png

Blog: Charting Successful Outcomes

Virtual Campus Tour

Admissions Predictor

Admissions
Requirements

Simplified Admissions Process:
AMCAS & OMSAS

Request More
Information

 

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Contact: Trinity School of Medicine, 12600 Deerfield Pkwy, Suite 100, Alpharetta, GA 30004


 

10.  From Medscape.com -- Optometrists, Ophthalmologists Announce First Collaborative Effort.      

After a very long history of turf wars, THIS is a BIG deal:

 

www.medscape.com

Norra MacReady

December 10, 2013

 

The American Academy of Ophthalmology (AAO) and the American Academy of Optometry (AAOpt) have announced

a joint initiative designed to foster greater support and sharing of resources among members of both organizations.

This marks the first large-scale, formal collaboration on educational initiatives between the 2 academies. Both

organizations hope that by collaborating, they can better coordinate educational efforts and standards of care

between optometrists and ophthalmologists.

 

The educational programs that will arise as a result of this collaboration are still under development and will not be

formally launched until 2015. However, the academies are informing their members now to give them an opportunity to

provide feedback as the programs take shape.

 

The initiative grew from a desire by the leaders of both organizations to find more common ground, said Bernard J.

Dolan, OD, president of the AAOpt. "Our initial conversations were around the idea that ophthalmologists and

optometrists work in a number of settings in different combinations and different ways: private practice, the Veterans

Administration, the Indian Health Service, academic departments," he told Medscape Medical News. Dr. Dolan and

David W. Parke II, MD, chief executive officer of the AAO, both "had the perception that within those settings, there

were some great collaborative efforts for the betterment of patient care, and perhaps it was time we tried to talk to

each other and identify areas within patient care and education where we could reach some common ground."

The collaboration will take into account the multifaceted nature of ophthalmology practice, said Dr. Parke, who

participated in a joint telephone interview with Dr. Dolan. "As in other areas of medicine, our practices are very

heterogeneous: 1-doctor shops in rural areas, large integrated systems, and multispecialty clinics," he explained. "

 

[Dr. Dolan and I] both feel that trying to develop a single model will not apply to large portions of our membership. Our

goal is to be very principle-based and to offer guidance to our members that will be focused on patient care."

The AAO distributed a press release stating that impetus for the collaboration arose in part from the aging of the

American population and the commensurate increase in demand for optometric and ophthalmologic services.

However, in their interview, Dr. Dolan and Dr. Parke downplayed this factor as a driver in the collaboration.

According to Dr. Parke, the primary driving factor was the desire to encourage the 2 academies to share information

and educational opportunities. "From the perspectives of both academies, we treat the same patients with many of

the same diseases, so it made good sense for us to be acting in a collaborative fashion because that was in the best

interests of the patient," he told Medscape Medical News. "The [AAO] holds an annual meeting that attracts about

27,000 attendees each year, and one of the major foci of our activities is to provide continuing medical education for

ophthalmologists. So we have a lot of educational resources, and it's always been our goal to optimize those

resources in the best interests of the patients."

 

Both physicians emphasized that the process has just begun, so no specific goals have been identified as yet. One

idea is to have a common symposium that would be offered at the annual meetings of both academies, with

ophthalmologists and optometrists making presentations together, Dr. Dolan said.

 

Building Bridges

 

A question that arises when considering any joint efforts between optometrists and ophthalmologists concerns the

risk of friction or turf battles. "We identified early on that there probably would be areas of disagreement," Dr. Dolan

said. "We elected to put those aside and focus instead on areas where we could find common ground."

Optometrists, Ophthalmologists Announce First Collaborative

 

Effort

 

Dr. Parke acknowledged that there has been a history of friction between the 2 professions, particularly when it

comes to defining the scope of practice. Similar to Dr. Dolan, he emphasized that the collaborative efforts would

concentrate on more positive areas of interaction, at least for now. "I'm certain that at some point we will have to talk

about [points of disagreement], but we have so many areas on which we can potentially interact in a positive fashion,

that for now we will focus on issues of collaboration rather than competition."

 

 

At least in its basic outline, this collaboration is similar to an effort started by the American Society of Cataract and

Refractive Surgery (ASCRS). In 2012, the ASCRS announced the formation of an Integrated Ophthalmic Managed

Eyecare Delivery (IOMED) task force that was charged with developing a healthcare delivery model that integrated the

strengths of optometrists and ophthalmologists who specialized in the treatment of cataracts. The 2013 annual

meeting of the ASCRS featured an IOMED symposium with sessions on topics such as practice management, new

technologies in an integrated practice, and dealing with challenging cases in an integrated practice setting.

IOMED essentially was developed as a way of expanding educational opportunities for ophthalmologists and

optometrists alike, noted task force member Douglas D. Koch, MD. "Ophthalmologists and optometrists have worked

together for a long time, but there have been relatively few educational efforts between them. There is a lot of material

presented at ophthalmology meetings that could benefit the optometrists who provide primary care to ophthalmology

patients."

 

Similarly, ophthalmologists could benefit from some of the information presented at optometry meetings, said Dr.

Koch, professor of ophthalmology, Cullen Eye Institute, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, Texas.

The task force did run into some pushback from a few ophthalmologists and state academies of ophthalmology,

which feared that some optometrists might try to gain surgical privileges, but so far that has not happened, Dr. Koch

said. He urged general ophthalmologists to "reach out to your optometry colleagues. Find ways to bring them into

your practice. They can be extraordinary practice extenders and free the ophthalmologists to concentrate on more

specialized problems."

 

After all, he said, "I think collaborative care is here to stay."

 

Dr. Dolan, Dr. Parke, and Dr. Koch have disclosed no relevant financial relationships.

 

Medscape Medical News © 2013 WebMD, LLC

Send comments and news tips to news@medscape.net.

Cite this article: Optometrists, Ophthalmologists Announce First Collaborative Effort. Medscape. Dec 10, 2013.

 

11.  The University of Tennessee Health Science Center (Memphis) Establishes a New Master’s Degree Program in Laboratory Research and Management.  

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE                                              

For more information, contact:

The University of Tennessee Health Science Center

Sheila Champlin -- (901) 448-4957, schampli@uthsc.edu or

Peggy Reisser Winburne -- (901) 448-4072, mreisser@uthsc.edu

 

 

The University of Tennessee Health Science Center

Establishes New Master’s Degree Program in

 Laboratory Research and Management

____________________________________________________

Memphis, Tenn. (Dec. 10, 2013) – Len Lothstein, PhD, considers himself lucky. He’s been a researcher at the University of Tennessee Health Science Center (UTHSC) for 25 years, and was fortunate enough to have had the same research assistant for 15 of those years.

“That’s highly unusual,” said Dr. Lothstein, an associate professor of Pathology and Pharmaceutical Sciences. “As often happens in laboratories, we hire someone as a lab assistant, and they will, more often than not, stick around for a year or two years, and then move on to a PhD program or med school. We could hardly fault them for doing that, but it’s a problem in continuity of research.”

That’s why Dr. Lothstein has developed a new graduate program at UTHSC designed to train qualified students to assume the technical staff positions of senior laboratory assistant and laboratory manager in biomedical research labs in the academic, government and private sectors.

The Master of Science in Laboratory Research and Management Program will begin in the fall of 2014, but Lothstein is already recruiting applicants with undergraduate records in the sciences for the initial five slots.

The intensive three-semester program on the UTHSC campus will be administered through the Department of Pathology in the College of Medicine, working in tandem with the College of Graduate Health Sciences. It will offer theoretical and practical laboratory experience, and also train students in the managerial and administrative skills required of a senior research assistant or lab manager in basic and translational biomedical research laboratories. The in-state tuition is $16,900. The out-of-state tuition is $25,970, but tuition costs may be partially offset by a laboratory stipend from a six-month research laboratory internship that is part of the training.

“What we want to do with this program is provide training in an academic environment, so that when these individuals come out with a master’s degree, they can step into a lab and become almost fully functional within a very short period of time,” he said. “We want to train individuals whose goal is to stay in this position for a length of time, eventually leading to a manager position, which can pay very nicely.”

Entry-level research lab assistants make from about $26,000 to $43,000 annually, according to figures provided by Dr. Lothstein. Salaries rise with education and experience to between $37,000 and $63,000, he said. Lab managers can make roughly $63,000 to about $110,000.

The U.S. Department of Labor’s Bureau of Labor Statistics predicts 14 percent growth for the laboratory assistant job classification over the next eight years, from an estimated 82,000 jobs to an estimated 91,000 by 2020. This growth is anticipated despite cutbacks in federal funding for research.

“We need to start training good support staff,” Dr. Lothstein said. This is important to some extent because of government funding cuts, which take principal investigators out of the labs in search of funding. “Without good technical staff, the work doesn’t get done. If the work doesn’t get done, the grant money doesn’t come in.”

 While Memphis-area salaries fall in the middle ranges, according to Dr. Lothstein, the local demand for an educated research laboratory workforce is high. The Memphis Bioworks Foundation stated recently that the Memphis bioscience job market is 24 percent above the national average, thanks to academic institutions, including UTHSC and St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital, as well as several hundred bioscience enterprises.

“We believe that this program, by providing very directed educational and practical experiences, will provide the highly valued, transferable skill set that we seek in those who play key personnel roles in our biomedical laboratories,” said Donald Thomason, PhD, dean of the College of Graduate Health Sciences. “In the past, the accumulation of these skills has often occurred through years of experience. With the framework provided by this program, an individual will be able to quickly assume a key role, as well as bring additional expertise to the laboratory.”  

Dr. Lothstein said it’s important that the biotech community in Memphis be aware of this new program. “They have a vested interest,” he said. “This is where their technical staff will be coming from, which will improve the nature of research in town.”

The program will provide not only qualified graduates to fill research jobs, but interns who can help staff labs while they are still learning. “This program is providing a skilled labor force that is needed both for the academic sector in this town and for the biotech sector,” he said. “I want both to get fully involved and invested in this.”

The application deadline is June 1. Anyone interested in learning more about this program or submitting an application, can contact Dr. Lothstein at (901) 448-3334, email llothstein@uthsc.edu, or go to http://grad.uthsc.edu/Programs/BCLRMMO.php  

As Tennessee’s only public, statewide, academic health system, the mission of the University of Tennessee Health Science Center (UTHSC) is to bring the benefits of the health sciences to the achievement and maintenance of human health, with a focus on the citizens of Tennessee and the region, by pursuing an integrated program of education, research, clinical care, and public service. Offering a broad range of postgraduate and selected baccalaureate training opportunities, the main UTHSC campus is located in Memphis and includes six colleges: Allied Health Sciences, Dentistry, Graduate Health Sciences, Medicine, Nursing and Pharmacy. UTHSC also educates and trains cohorts of medicine, pharmacy and/or allied health students -- in addition to medical residents and fellows -- at its major sites in Knoxville, Chattanooga and Nashville. Founded in 1911, during its more than 100 years, UT Health Science Center has educated and trained more than 56,000 health care professionals in academic settings and health care facilities across the state. For more information, visit www.uthsc.edu.

##

  DSC_0873 Len Lothstein, PhD, has developed a new Master of Science in Laboratory Research and Management Program that will begin in the fall of 2014 at the University of Tennessee Health Science Center.

 

12.  ===AAMC STAT===, News from the Association of American Medical Colleges, January 13, 2014 edition.   

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News from the Association of American Medical Colleges

January 13, 2014

• Study Examines Personnel Policies for Part-time Faculty
• Solving the Physician Shortage Is Not an “Either-or” Proposition
• Deadline Extended for Submissions to Workforce Research Conference
• New Articles from Academic Medicine Now Online
• NIH to Fund Research Workforce Diversity Program
• On the Move



Study Examines Personnel Policies for Part-time Faculty

A new Analysis in Brief  reporting on the current state of personnel policies for part-time faculty shows there are marked differences across U.S. medical schools. While more than three-quarters of schools had defined faculty career tracks in place for basic science and clinical part-time faculty, slightly more than one-quarter of responding institutions had a written policy in place on productivity and performance expectations. These findings suggest that policy clarifications would benefit part-time faculty and institutions by establishing a standard approach and procedure to guide appointments.


Solving the Physician Shortage Is Not an “Either-or” Proposition

Recent news articles questioning whether or not the nation is facing a physician shortage is the focus of a recent Reporter column by AAMC President and CEO Darrell G. Kirch, M.D. In the column, Kirch responds to the premise that the shortage will be averted through new care delivery models and medical innovations only. He argues that while medical schools and teaching hospitals are working on ways to change health care delivery and develop new technology, there still needs to be a modest increase of 4,000 physicians a year to meet the nation’s health needs. To read the column, visit www.aamc.org/newsroom/reporter/.


Deadline Extended for Submissions to Workforce Research Conference

The deadline to submit abstracts for the AAMC’s 10th Annual Health Workforce Research Conference has been extended to Jan. 15, at 5:00 p.m. ET. The conference is the premier opportunity for researchers, educators, and policymakers to meet and discuss state and federal workforce issues. Held May 1–2 in Washington, D.C., this year’s conference theme is “Finding the Right Fit: The Health Workforce Needed to Support the Affordable Care Act.” For more information, visit the conference's call for abstracts page.


New Articles from Academic Medicine Now Online

Newly published ahead-of-print articles from Academic Medicine include studies on mentoring and career satisfaction for faculty, and gender distribution across academic track types. New content also examines the performance of longitudinal integrated clerkships versus rotation-based clerkships. In addition, the January issue is online and features a collection of articles on spirituality in medicine. To access the articles, visit www.academicmedicine.org.


NIH to Fund Research Workforce Diversity Program

The National Institutes of Health (NIH) has three new funding opportunities to develop approaches to engage researchers, especially from backgrounds underrepresented in biomedical science, and prepare them to thrive in NIH-funded research careers. The opportunities, offered through the Enhancing Diversity of the NIH-Funded Workforce program, focus on mentorship, building infrastructure at under-resourced institutions with high concentrations of students from disadvantaged backgrounds, and an assessment and evaluation center that will examine the progress of the first two initiatives. To learn more about the program, visit the NIH Web site.


On the Move

Robert D. Simari, M.D., has been named executive dean of the University of Kansas School of Medicine, effective March 24. He is currently professor of medicine at the Mayo Clinic, vice chair of the Division of Cardiovascular Diseases, and co-director of the Mayo Center for Clinical and Translational Sciences. He succeeds Douglas Girod, M.D., who has served as interim executive dean since he became executive vice chancellor at University of Kansas Medical Center on Feb. 1, 2013.

Robert "Bo" Dunlay Jr., M.D., M.B.A., has been named dean of the Creighton University School of Medicine. Dunlay, a nephrologist, has served as the school's interim dean since Jan. 1, 2013.

 

13.  Resources are available for Native Americans interested in healthcare professions.   

From Nancy Blass, Sr. Premed Advisor/Coordinator

Premedical Professions Advising, University of Oklahoma

 

As I’m sure many are aware, the State of Oklahoma is home to many different Native American tribes, and the University of Oklahoma provides college educations to many.  In spite of this, I am always surprised at how few feel they have the opportunities to go on to medical school and the profession.  Dental school sees even fewer Native Americans.  Nevertheless, we persevere in our efforts to encourage this valued population to enter the health professions.  Last cycle saw a slight increase in the numbers applying from OU and I find this encouraging.

 

For those from outside of Oklahoma, please be aware that OU offers a full complement of hard science courses during the summer months.  Both of our general chemistry courses are available online, too.  Organic 1, 2 and lab, as well as Biochemistry are available and taught in-class during the summer, and usually Fundamentals of Microbiology and lab are available.  In fact, even though OU is on the semester system, the summer semester is arranged in such a fashion that it would be possible for a student to complete as much as 18 hours over a summer.  It’s not a summer that I would want to do, but it is possible, and students have accomplished this feat!

 

If there is anything I can offer as an advisor to help these Native American students through my assistance, please pass on my contact information to them.  Often there is scholarships available for those in need.  Resources are available, but as always it takes making the right connections and asking the right people.  I’m so glad NAAHP is available to help facilitate the connections.

 

Nancy J. Blass

Sr. Premed Advisor/Coordinator

Premedical Professions Advising

University of Oklahoma

308 Cate Center Drive, #415

405-325-2457

 

 

 

14. International Service Learning (ISL) offers 9-day global health opportunities over Spring Break.    

ISL

International Service Learning

Serving the global community, one adventure at a time!  

We have 9-day global health opportunities available to Mexico, Belize, Jamaica, the Dominican Republic & Haiti, Nicaragua, Costa Rica, Panama, and Peru over Spring Break!

In additional to our multi-disciplinary global health teams, we offer nursing, dental, optometry, physical therapy, veterinary, and education volunteer opportunities.

Visit our schedule for a full listing of opportunities available.

Faculty:  We can integrate your academic courses with our existing programs, allowing you to tailor the service learning experience to your educational goals. Students gain valuable skills and global perspective, while vulnerable communities receive health services and medications to which they would otherwise have little or no access. 

For more information contact us at Info@ISLonline.org or (816) 767-0481, or visit our website, www.ISLonline.org

 

15.  St. George’s University (Grenada, West Indies) is offering a series of Information Sessions. 

 


We hold information sessions all over the world throughout the year, and you’re invited to join us at one in your area this Spring. Learn everything you need to know about the University from its administrators, admission advisors, students, and alumni.   


ARIZONA
Tucson, AZ 
Tuesday, March 4, 2014


CALIFORNIA

Fresno, CA
Thursday, January 30, 2014

San Francisco, CA *
Saturday, February 1, 2014

Los Angeles, CA *
Saturday, April 12, 2014


DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA
Washington, DC
Thursday, March 13, 2014



FLORIDA

Miami, FL *
Wednesday, March 26, 2014

Orlando, FL
Thursday, March 27, 2014


GEORGIA
Atlanta, GA
Wednesday, April 2, 2014


ILLINOIS
Chicago, IL *
Saturday, April 26, 2014



INDIANA
Indianapolis, IN
Wednesday, March 12, 2014


LOUISIANA
New Orleans, LA
Monday, March 10, 2014



MASSACHUSETTS
Boston, MA
Tuesday, April 1, 2014

MICHIGAN
Detroit, MI *
Thursday, March 27, 2014

 

 

 

MISSOURI
Kansas City, MO
Thursday, April 3, 2014
 

NEW JERSEY
Jersey City, NJ
Thursday, April 24, 2014



NEW YORK
New York, NY *
Saturday, March 1, 2014

 

OHIO
Columbus, OH
Saturday, February 22, 2014


PENNSYLVANIA
Philadelphia, PA
Thursday, February 13, 2014


TEXAS
Dallas, TX  
Thursday, January 30, 2014
 
Houston, TX
Saturday, February 15, 2014


WASHINGTON
Seattle, WA
Saturday, April 26, 2014


WISCONSIN
Milwaukee, WI
Saturday, April 12, 2014

CANADA

Vancouver, BC *
Thursday, February 27, 2014

Edmonton, AB
Friday, February 28, 2014

Winnipeg, MB
Saturday, March 1, 2014

Montreal, QC
Tuesday, March 11, 2014

Toronto, ON
Wednesday, March 12, 2014

Ottawa, ON
Thursday, March13, 2014








* Backstage @ SGU

US/Canada: 1 (800) 899-6337 ext. 9 1280 • International: +1 (631) 665-8500 ext. 9 1380
sgu.edu/future-studentssguenrolment@sgu.edu
Grenada, West Indies

 

 

16.  Marginalia:  Meanwhile, in Canada…   

 

 

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 cid:16.1760708715@web162005.mail.bf1.yahoo.com

cid:17.1760708715@web162005.mail.bf1.yahoo.com

cid:18.1760708715@web162005.mail.bf1.yahoo.com

cid:19.1760708715@web162005.mail.bf1.yahoo.com

cid:20.1760708715@web162005.mail.bf1.yahoo.com

 

 

 

Dr. Stan Eisen, Director
Preprofessional Health Programs
Biology Department
Christian Brothers University

650 East Parkway South
Memphis, TN 38104

E-mail: seisen@cbu.edu
http://www.cbu.edu/~seisen/
Caduceus Newsletter Archives: http://www.cbu.edu/~seisen/Caduceus.html