http://www.cbu.edu/

Caduceus Newsletter:  Spring 2008.12, Week of March 24

Dr. Stan Eisen, Director
Preprofessional Health Programs
Christian Brothers University

650 East Parkway South
Memphis, TN  38104

Home page:
http://www.cbu.edu/~seisen/


Caduceus Newsletter Archives:
http://www.cbu.edu/~seisen/Caduceus.html 

 

Table of Contents:
1.  ACS/BBB/PHP (American Chemical Society, Beta Beta Beta/Preprofessional Health Programs) Activities.    
2.  San Diego State University announces a new Bioinformatics and Medical Informatics (BMI) Graduate Program
3.  East Tennessee State University Quillen College of Medicine announces its results of the National Residency Matching Program. 
4.  The Appalachian Coal Country Watershed Team (ACCWT) is still looking to fill Summer Associates positions.
5.  ==== AAMC STAT ====, News from the Association of American Medical Colleges, March 17, 2008 edition. 
6.  Heparin Discovery May Point to Chinese Counterfeiting, from the New York Times (Registration Required):  Appearing in the March 20, 2008 issue of Science in the News.

7.  Marginalia 1:  A post-script to this year’s St. Patrick’s Day --
8.  Marginalia 2:  Hey, Bullwinkle!  Is that really you?  (An albino moose in Summit County, Colorado.)

 

1.  ACS/BBB/PHP (American Chemical Society, Beta Beta Beta/Preprofessional Health Programs) Activities.       

  • Wednesday, March 26:  Practice date for the annual Youth and Vitality vs. Old Age and Deceit Charity Volleyball Game, 5-7 p.m., in the Canale Arena
  • Monday, March 31:  Practice date for the annual Youth and Vitality vs. Old Age and Deceit Charity Volleyball Game, 5-7 p.m., in the Canale Arena
  • Tuesday, April 1:  Annual Youth and Vitality vs. Old Age and Deceit Charity Volleyball Game, time TBA, in the Canale Arena
  • Thursday, April 3**:  ACS officer nominations for 2008-2009, Room S155, starting at 12:30 p.m. 
  • Saturday, April 5:  Tennessee Academy of Science, at the University of Memphis
  • Thursday, April 10**:  ACS officer elections, S155, starting at 12:30 p.m.
  • Tuesday, April 15:  Senior Research Poster Session
  • Thursday, April 17:  Senior Day

*NOTE:  You *must* be at these meetings if you are an officer.  NO EXCEPTIONS.

**NOTE:  If you intend on running for officership again, nominating another person, or voting in the election, you must attend these meetings as well. These meetings will be joint meetings with Tri-Beta, as they are nominating and voting on officers the same days we are.

Also, there are tours of St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital scheduled on several dates:

Friday, April 11th 10:30a. to 11: 30a. or 1:15p. to 2:15p.

Friday, May 2nd 10:30a. to 11:30a. or 1:15p. to 2:15p.

 

 

2.  San Diego State University announces a new Bioinformatics and Medical Informatics (BMI) Graduate Program

The BMI graduate program at San Diego State University (http://informatics.sdsu.edu/) is accepting applications for Fall 2008.   The program has the traditional tracks plus the Professional Science Master’s (PSM) option that prepares students for fast track into management in industry by including an internship with an industry partner and courses in business and management.  Program brochure is attached.
 
The program has been carefully designed to accommodate students with four distinct backgrounds:
 
1.                   Students with a background in Biology, Microbiology, physiology, etc.
 
2.                   Students with a background in Chemistry, Biochemistry, Pharmacy, or Medical Sciences (including Premed and Public Health).
 
3.                   Students with a background in Computer Science
 
4.                   Students with a background in Physical Sciences (Mathematics, statistics, physics) or Engineering
 
 The program is a two year program.  It is uniquely designed to complement the student's background in the first year, and to deepen her/his knowledge in informatics in the second year.  So, students take different paths in the first year, and come together in the second year. 
 
As you may be aware, Bioinformatics has four general corners (foci): Those who work in developing algorithms with more in depth data analysis and mathematical knowledge, those who work on creating new software tools requiring more in depth Computer Science/Software Engineering knowledge, those who use the tools available in solving specific biological problems with more in depth biological knowledge, and those who use existing tools/algorithms for general biological and data mining and analysis.  We also have faculty in all areas of your interest in the BMI program.  This allows you to specialize in any of the above four areas in the second year of the program. 
 
Similarly, Medical Informatics has distinct branches in which you can focus on, in the second year.  These include medical/clinical data warehousing/management, algorithm development for medical/clinical data mining and decision making, networking and data accessibility, etc.  Additionally, we have foci in Chemical Informatics in which you might also be interested in.  This area includes concentrations in problems such as automated chemical structure determination (important among others for homeland security). 
 
Teaching and/or research in Bioinformatics or Medical/Chemical Informatics is a great and rewarding career option.  It is also one that is experiencing a tremendous shortage of expertise.  If you qualify, you may be able to start your teaching career early in the form of a teaching assistantship for some of our courses or research assistantship in one of our research laboratories. 
 
Alternatively, if you are interested in an industry career path, in our BMI program, we have a Professional Science Masters (PSM) option which trains students for a fast track in advancing to higher managerial positions in the biotech, pharmaceutical, and medical/clinical industries.  In this option you learn science content along with business and management skills that are required to lead teams of scientists in the industry.  San Diego is the largest Biotechnology hub and one of the largest pharmaceutical and medical industry hubs in the US.  As such, our program is strategically located to place its graduates in one of the most vibrant industries in the world.  Our students typically have a much easier job in finding fulltime and internship positions in the industry.
 
For more information, please visit http://informatics.sdsu.edu/.
 
For information about how to apply, please visit http://bioinformatics.sdsu.edu/admission.html.
 
 
----------------------------------
Faramarz Valafar
Director, CSU-PSM Initiative
Director, Bioinformatics and Medical Informatics Research Center (BMIRC)
San Diego State University
 

 

3.  East Tennessee State University Quillen College of Medicine announces its results of the National Residency Matching Program.

Hello,

The Class of 2008 at East Tennessee State University’s James H. Quillen College of Medicine will begin residency training programs throughout the country on July 1, 2008. Joining medical students throughout the country, our students received the results of the National Resident Matching Program at noon on Thursday, March 20, 2008.

The National Residency Matching Program pairs graduating medical students with residency programs throughout the country. The 56 members of the Class of 2008 enjoyed a successful match in 16 different specialties/sub-specialties at 30 residency sites throughout the United States.  Ten students will continue their training with the Quillen College of Medicine, and eight additional students will remain in Tennessee at other institutions for their residency training.  Nearly 80% of Quillen students will train at institutions in the southern region.  Fifty-nine per cent of the class of 2008 will enter primary care (Family Medicine, Pediatrics, Internal Medicine and Obstetrics-Gynecology), exceeding the national average.

A number of students matched to highly competitive specialty programs: two students in Ophthalmology; two students in Radiology; one student in Orthopedic Surgery, and one in Anesthesiology.

Our students will attend residency at institutions throughout the United States, including: East Tennessee State University, University of Tennessee, University of Alabama-Birmingham, University of Virginia, Wake Forest University, Yale, Cornell, Georgetown, Dartmouth, and Emory.

Thank you for all you do!

Stephanie Cole, Admissions Counselor
James
H. Quillen College
of Medicine
Phone: (423) 439-2036
Fax: (423) 439-2110
http://com.etsu.edu

 

4.  The Appalachian Coal Country Watershed Team (ACCWT) is still looking to fill Summer Associates positions.

Build job experience working with local, state and federal organizations and dynamic local leaders!

The Appalachian Coal Country Watershed Team (ACCWT) is looking for Summer Associates to live and work in low-income communities dealing with contaminated streams, depressed economies and other issues related to abandoned mine lands. ACCWT Summer Interns will spend 8 or more weeks working closely with local community watershed groups that have mobilized to alleviate these problems and make their home-place-watersheds healthier places to live and work.

  • Learn how agencies and community groups make environmental change happen on the ground level.
  • Build valuable field and office skills in organizational capacity building, communications, and environmental organizing.
  • Meet and work with effective grassroots leaders.

·         Help the people of Coal Country make their communities cleaner, healthier, and safer places to live and work!

 

Locations: 30 sites in Appalachian Coal Country states (OH, WV, VA, TN, KY, AL, PA, MD).

Duration: 8 weeks

Dates: Several options beginning in May/June 2008.

Hours: Full Time.

Benefits: Living allowance of $1560 for 8 weeks and an option for a $1000 education award* or a $200 cash stipend to be paid upon completion of service.

 

Positions are filling up on a rolling basis – apply now! Please send your resume and a 1-page letter of intent to Lucas Elser at training@accwt.org or call 304-461-3135 for more details.  Learn more about the Appalachian Coal Country Watershed Team at http://www.accwt.org.

Want to get involved in the AmeriCorps but looking for more than a summer position? The ACCWT has full year VISTA positions available!  Please contact Torie Bowman at recruit@accwt.org or call 304-461-3131 for more information, or check out our website at http://www.accwt.org.

 

* An individual can only receive a total of two (2) VISTA Education Awards in their lifetime. Accepting the pro-rated Summer Associate Education Award will count as a VISTA Education Award.  It is advised that if an applicant is considering completing two (2) full year VISTA positions in the future to decline the Summer Associate Education Award.

 

5.  ==== AAMC STAT ====, News from the Association of American Medical Colleges, March 17, 2008 edition.

  == AAMC, hospital groups sue federal government to stop Medicaid cuts

  == Dept. of Education to increase health professions student loan limits

  == HHMI announces new award to support early career scientists

  == Report, Congressional hearing explore consequences of flat NIH budget

  == Participants sought for prevention education institute

  == On the move

 

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AAMC, hospital groups sue federal government to stop Medicaid cuts

 

Last week, a coalition of hospital groups asked a federal court to prevent

the Bush administration from implementing a proposed Medicaid regulation that

would cut $5 billion in funding to safety net hospitals. The coalition, led

by the National Association of Public Hospitals and Health Systems, the

American Hospital Association, and the AAMC, and supported by the National

Association of Children's Hospitals, claims the administration tried to

circumvent the will of Congress in order to cut the Medicaid program. The

lawsuit maintains that the cuts--issued in a final rule by the Centers for

Medicare and Medicaid Services--are beyond the scope of the agency's

regulatory power under current federal law. Hospital leaders say that if the

rule is implemented, some of the medical services all communities rely on

will be jeopardized.

 

Information: Go to http://www.aamc.org/newsroom/pressrel/2008/080311.htm

 

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Dept. of Education to increase health professions student loan limits

 

In response to an AAMC-led group letter sent last fall to Secretary of

Education Margaret Spellings, the Department of Education has agreed to raise

the combined aggregate Stafford loan limit for health professions students

from $189,125 to $224,000. Secretary Spellings sent a letter to AAMC

President and CEO Darrell G. Kirch, M.D., last month, in which she announced

the increase in student loan limits and promised to provide additional

information as soon as possible. This increase is entirely in unsubsidized

Stafford loans and will allow medical students to borrow at a 6.8 percent

interest rate.

 

Information: Go to

http://www.aamc.org/advocacy/library/educ/corres/2008/022808hploanlimits.pdf

 

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HHMI announces new award to support early career scientists

 

The Howard Hughes Medical Institute (HHMI) has announced a new grant program

for early career scientists. Through a national competition, HHMI plans to

invest more than $300 million in as many as 70 early career scientists from

various biological and medical science disciplines. Candidates must hold a

tenure or tenure-track position and have at least two but no more than six

years of experience since their initial appointment as an assistant professor

(or equivalent position). Awardees will receive six-year, non-renewable

appointments to HHMI. Scientists must indicate their intention to submit an

application by April 30. The deadline for completed applications is June 10.

HHMI is planning a second competition in 2011.   

 

Information: Go to http://www.hhmi.org//news/earlycareer20080310.html

 

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Report, Congressional hearing explore consequences of flat NIH budget

 

Five consecutive years of flat funding for the National Institutes of Health

(NIH) have deterred promising young researchers and threatened medical

progress, a group of academic research institutions warned last week. A new

report released by the institutions, "A Broken Pipeline? Flat Funding of the

NIH Puts a Generation of Science at Risk," states that stagnant NIH funding

is taking a toll on the American medical research enterprise and predicts

that the nation will lose a generation of young researchers to other careers

and other countries if the NIH budget is not increased. The report profiles

12 junior researchers from institutions across the country who attest to the

funding difficulties they and their professional peers are experiencing.

 

Corresponding with the release of the report, the U.S. Senate Health,

Education, Labor, and Pensions Committee held a hearing to explore the

negative effects of flat funding for the NIH on the next generation of

medical researchers.

 

Information: Go to http://www.brokenpipeline.org/brokenpipeline.pdf

 

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Participants sought for prevention education institute

 

The Association for Prevention Teaching and Research is seeking applications

for a professional collaboration, the Institute for Interprofessional

Prevention Education. Up to 20 teams composed of three faculty members from

different health professions within the same academic health center will be

selected to attend the Institute.  Applicants must describe the type of

educational and developmental project they plan to undertake as a

post-Institute project. The Institute will be held Sept. 4-5.  The

application deadline is April 21.

 

Information: http://www.atpm.org/prof_dev/interprofessional_ed.html

 

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On the move

 

William R. Brody, M.D., Ph.D., will retire as president of Johns Hopkins

University on Dec. 31, after serving in the position for more than 12 years.

 

Jean E. Robillard, M.D., vice president for medical affairs for the

University of Iowa and dean of the Roy J. and Lucille A. Carver College of

Medicine, will step down from his role as dean to focus on his

responsibilities as vice president. He would like a new dean in place by July

1.

 

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Academic Medicine Online

 

Can specially designed comprehensive medical school programs adequately

address the rural physician shortage? Do medical students experience a

decline in empathy over the course of their training? Can evidence-based

medicine and humanism coexist in the clinical encounter? How can we train

residents to respond effectively to a large-scale crisis situation? These

important questions and many of the most pressing issues facing the academic

medicine community are explored in the March issue of Academic Medicine. 

www.academicmedicine.org

 

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To subscribe to AAMC STAT

 

Subscribe or unsubscribe online through the AAMC STAT Web page:

http://www.aamc.org/aamcstat. Or send a new e-mail message to

majordomo@aamcinfo.aamc.org, typing only the words "subscribe aamcstat" or

"unsubscribe aamcstat" in the body (not the subject) of the message. Please

do not reply to this message and do not send your e-mail message in HTML

format. You will be notified when your request has been fulfilled.

 

 

6.  Heparin Discovery May Point to Chinese Counterfeiting, from the New York Times (Registration Required):  Appearing in the March 20, 2008 issue of Science in the News.

Federal drug regulators, in announcing Wednesday that the mystery

contaminant in heparin was an inexpensive, unapproved ingredient altered to

mimic the real thing, moved closer to concluding that Americans might be

the latest victims of lethal Chinese drug counterfeiting.

 

The finding by the Food and Drug Administration culminated a worldwide race

to identify the substance discovered early this month in certain batches of

heparin, the blood-thinning drug that had been linked to 19 deaths in the

United States and hundreds of allergic reactions.

 

The contaminant, the regulators said, is a chemically altered form of

chondroitin sulfate, a dietary supplement made from animal cartilage that

is widely used to treat joint pain.

 

To read more: http://www.nytimes.com/2008/03/20/health/20heparin.html

 

Or: http://snipurl.com/227fa

 

 

7.  Marginalia 1:  A post-script to this year’s St. Patrick’s Day --

There are two basic types of Yoga:

One, the yoga from India, requires much practice, patience, and discipline --


 

 



 
 


And
 

Then  

 

There's


  Irish   Yoga:



 



-



 

 

8.  Marginalia 2:  Hey, Bullwinkle!  Is that really you?  (An albino moose in Summit County, Colorado.)

“Don't know if any of you have seen these photos yet - they are amazing photos of an albino moose taken in the Peak 7 neighborhood of Summit County,Colorado.  While we see them often in our yard, we've never seen one like this before.”
 

Anybody can evolve bipedalism.  See?

Dr. Stan Eisen, Director
Preprofessional Health Programs
Biology Department
Christian Brothers University

650 East Parkway South
Memphis, TN 38104

E-mail: seisen@cbu.edu
http://www.cbu.edu/~seisen/
Caduceus Newsletter Archives: http://www.cbu.edu/~seisen/Caduceus.html