Caduceus Newsletter: Spring 2004.10, Week of March 29.

 

 

è 1. MANY RURAL AFRICANS MAY HAVE HIV-LIKE VIRUS FROM RAW PRIMATE MEAT from The Baltimore Sun, appearing in the March 19, 2004 issue of Science in the News, a daily science digest from Sigma Xi.
è 2. ADDRESSING THE UNTHINKABLE, U.S. REVIVES STUDY OF FALLOUT from The New York Times (Registration Required), appearing in the March 19, 2004 issue of Science in the News, a daily science digest from Sigma Xi.
è 3. The Quillen College of Medicine at East Tennessee State University (Johnson City, TN) grooms the majority of their graduates for careers in primary care. (An e-note from Annalisa Mills, Admissions Counselor.)
è 4. ADULT STEM CELL TRANSPLANTS FAIL IN 2 STUDIES from The San Francisco Chronicle, appearing in the March 22, 2004 issue of Science in the News, a daily science digest from Sigma Xi.
è 5. Received this week.
è 6. FDA URGES DRUGMAKERS TO INCLUDE SUICIDE WARNING ON ANTIDEPRESSANTS from Newsday, appearing in the March 23, 2004 issue of Science in the News, a daily science digest from Sigma Xi.
è 7. Try to imagine the way you were as a 5-year old in kindergarten. Got a mental image? Good. NOW read "Boy, 5, sprinkles marijuana on schoolmate's lasagna", from the Wednesday, March 24, 2004 issue of the Commercial Appeal.
è 8. PENGUIN-CAM SNAPS AMAZING IMAGES from BBC Online, appearing in the March 22, 2004 issue of Science in the News, a daily science digest from Sigma Xi.

 

è 1. MANY RURAL AFRICANS MAY HAVE HIV-LIKE VIRUS FROM RAW PRIMATE MEAT from The Baltimore Sun, appearing in the March 19, 2004 issue of Science in the News, a daily science digest from Sigma Xi.

By hunting and handling fresh primate meat, thousands of rural Africans might be infected with a virus in the same general category as HIV, according to a new study by researchers at Johns Hopkins University and the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

The study is the first to document virus transmission from primates to humans in a natural setting.

"This is the first real-world evidence that these viruses cross species boundaries. And this appears to be something that is happening regularly," said the study's lead author, Nathan Wolfe, an epidemiologist at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health.
http://snipurl.com/56y3

 

è 2. ADDRESSING THE UNTHINKABLE, U.S. REVIVES STUDY OF FALLOUT from The New York Times (Registration Required), appearing in the March 19, 2004 issue of Science in the News, a daily science digest from Sigma Xi. (as if there wasn't enough in the world to worry about…)

 

 To cope with the possibility that terrorists might someday detonate a nuclear bomb on American soil, the federal government is reviving a scientific art that was lost after the cold war: fallout analysis.

The goal, officials and weapons experts both inside and outside the government say, is to figure out quickly who exploded such a bomb and where the nuclear material came from. That would clarify the options for striking back. Officials also hope that if terrorists know a bomb can be traced, they will be less likely to try to use one.

In a secretive effort that began five years ago but whose outlines are just now becoming known, the government's network of weapons laboratories is hiring new experts, calling in old-timers, dusting off data and holding drills to sharpen its ability to do what is euphemistically known as nuclear attribution or post-event forensics.
http://snipurl.com/5700

 

è 3. The Quillen College of Medicine at East Tennessee State University (Johnson City, TN) grooms the majority of their graduates for careers in primary care. (An e-note from Annalisa Mills, Admissions Counselor.)

Dear Advisors:

The Match Day 2004 celebration was held yesterday. All Quillen College of Medicine students who participated in the match received a residency assignment. 63 percent of the Class of 2004 will enter the area of primary care, with a record number of students in the class entering pediatrics training. For more information about the match please view stories at the following links:

Johnson City Press: http://www.johnsoncitypress.com/default.asp?SectionID=DETAIL&ID=32631

Quillen College of Medicine:
http://com.etsu.edu From the main page, select "latest news" and then "Match Day '04 reveals impressive news for medical students at Quillen". Results of the match may be viewed at the following link: http://com.etsu.edu/acadaffairs/files/Match%20Grid%20Master.pdf

Please feel free to share this information with any of your students who are considering Quillen College of Medicine.

Best regards,

Annalisa Mills, Admissions Counselor
James H. Quillen College of Medicine
423-928-7577

 

 

è 4. ADULT STEM CELL TRANSPLANTS FAIL IN 2 STUDIES from The San Francisco Chronicle, appearing in the March 22, 2004 issue of Science in the News, a daily science digest from Sigma Xi.

 Two failed attempts to transplant adult stem cells into the hearts of laboratory mice are casting doubt on the value and safety of clinical trials testing a similar approach to repair the hearts of humans.

In two separate papers released Sunday in the online version of the journal Nature, researchers at Stanford University and another team of scientists from Indiana University and the University of Washington describe how efforts to use adult stem cells from a mouse to regenerate heart muscle in other mice simply did not work.

The setback raises questions about similar experiments among human subjects in Brazil, Germany, Britain and China.
http://snipurl.com/58kw

 

è 5. Received this week.

From St. George's University, Grenada, West Indies

  • Viewbook
  • Medical School catalogue
  • Graduate Health Sciences catalogue
  • CD-ROM with a virtual tour

 

è 6. FDA URGES DRUGMAKERS TO INCLUDE SUICIDE WARNING ON ANTIDEPRESSANTS from Newsday, appearing in the March 23, 2004 issue of Science in the News, a daily science digest from Sigma Xi.

Federal regulators Monday asked pharmaceutical companies to strengthen the wording on labels on 10 antidepressants to warn the drugs may heighten risk of suicide.

"We don't know yet if there is a link between antidepressant use and suicide," said Dr. Thomas Laughren, team leader of the Food and Drug Administration's psychopharmacology group. But Monday's recommendation comes on the heels of an FDA advisory committee's recommendation last month to add the warning while the committee continues to investigate. Laughren said the warning is intended for all ages, not just children and teenagers.

"This is a good warning," said Dr. Harold Koplewicz, director of New York University's Child Study Center in Manhattan, and an expert on childhood depression. Koplewicz said 11 million prescriptions for antidepressants were written last year, most probably issued by primary care doctors.
http://snipurl.com/59ed

 

è 7. Try to imagine the way you were as a 5-year old in kindergarten. Got a mental image? Good. NOW read "Boy, 5, sprinkles marijuana on schoolmate's lasagna", from the Wednesday, March 24, 2004 issue of the Commercial Appeal. 

MIAMI - North Miami elementary school officials caught one of their kindergartners seasoning his friend's lasagna with marijuana, police said.

The 5-year old boy, whose name is not being released, was sitting with a friend in the Gratigny Elementary School cafeteria on Monday when a worker saw the boy sprinkle something over his friend's lunch. When the worker asked why he was playing with someone else's food, the child tried to hide a small bag of pot, said Mayco Villafana, spokesman for the Miami-Dade School District.

"Tests from police came back that it was marijuana," Villafana said. "the question then became, "How do you investigate a 5-year-old?"

School officials took both boys to the principal's office and confiscated the marijuana, which was less than $5 worth. The pot-laced lasagna went uneaten.

Aaron Enteen, principal of the school, declined to comment. The children were allowed to return to class after speaking with police.

The boy with the marijuana was not arrested, said Miami-Dade Schools Police Sgt. Carlos Fernandez.

The Miami-Dade State Attorney's Office did not plan any action in the case.

"We wouldn't prosecute a 5-year old," said spokesman Ed Griffith. 

 

è 8. PENGUIN-CAM SNAPS AMAZING IMAGES from BBC Online, appearing in the March 22, 2004 issue of Science in the News, a daily science digest from Sigma Xi.

Scientists have obtained amazing images of penguins interacting with each other underwater by strapping miniature cameras to the flightless birds' backs.

Observing genuine underwater behaviour in marine birds and mammals is tricky because the presence of a diver nearby can make the animals act unnaturally.

By attaching cameras to the penguins, the scientists could see that the birds kept together during dives for food.

Details of the work appear in the Royal Society journal Biology Letters.
http://snipurl.com/5ab4

Dr. Stan Eisen, Director
Preprofessional Health Programs
Biology Department
Christian Brothers University
650 East Parkway South
Memphis, TN 38104
E-mail: seisen@cbu.edu
http://www.cbu.edu/~seisen/
Caduceus Newsletter Archives: http://www.cbu.edu/~seisen/Caduceus.html