Christian Brothers University

www.cbu.edu

Caduceus Newsletter: Fall 2014.12 , Week of November 17  

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Image from the U.S. Department of Energy Genome Program web site:   http://genomics.energy.gov  

Dr. Stan Eisen, Director
Preprofessional Health Programs
Christian Brothers University
650 East Parkway South
Memphis, TN  38104

Home page:
http://facstaff.cbu.edu/~seisen/ 

Caduceus Newsletter Archives:
http://facstaff.cbu.edu/~seisen/Caduceus.html

Let’s say, hypothetically, that you apply and get accepted to one of the summer undergraduate research programs at UT Southwestern Medical Center in Dallas.  That means, of course that you will be only 196 miles from Austin, http://www.austin360.com/ .

 

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For more information about the summer undergraduate research programs, please go to Article #9.

 

Table of Contents:

 

1.  The University of Mississippi Medical Center (Jackson, MS) offers graduate degree programs in a variety of subjects, including Anatomy, Biochemistry, Biomedical Materials Science, Medical Pharmacology, Microbiology, Neuroscience, Pathology, and Physiology & Biophysics.  
2.  Only osteopathic physicians are trained and licensed to provide Osteopathic Manipulative Medicine (OMM). 
3.  ===AAMC STAT===, News from the Association of American Medical Colleges, November 9, 2014 edition.  
4.  ===AAMC STAT===, News from the Association of American Medical Colleges, November 10, 2014 edition.  
5.  AACOM (American Association of Colleges of Osteopathic Medicine) Information Alert:  2014 Midterm Election Update and AACOM Advocacy Efforts.  
6.  AACOM (American Association of Colleges of Osteopathic Medicine) announces the launching of its new website, www.aacom.org .  
7.  Human Error Seeps into Electronic Medical Records, or, “Here’s another nice mess you’ve got me into…”
  
8.  The Frontier Nursing Courier Internship Program, in existence since the 1920's, offers participants an opportunity to shadow healthcare practitioners in rural and underserved communities, learn about Appalachia, and grow personally.   
9.  The University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center (Dallas) offers 4 summer undergraduate research programs. 

10.  Syracuse University offers graduate degrees in Forensic Science at The Forensic and National Security Sciences Institute. 
11.  The National Institutes of Health (NIH) announced a new NIH-Amgen program intended for undergraduate students interested in PhD and combined degree programs in the sciences.  
12.  Gap Medics is the world’s largest provider of international pre-health clinical experience, specializing in short-term hospital shadowing internships.  

 

1.  The University of Mississippi Medical Center (Jackson, MS) offers graduate degree programs in a variety of subjects, including Anatomy, Biochemistry, Biomedical Materials Science, Medical Pharmacology, Microbiology, Neuroscience, Pathology, and Physiology & Biophysics.  

Great opportunities for college graduates are available through The School of Graduate Studies in the Health Sciences at the University of Mississippi Medical Center (UMMC) in Jackson, MS. The UMMC School of Graduate Studies offers a variety of degree programs which prepare students for careers in medical research and teaching. UMMC research programs receive approximately 80 million dollars annually from agencies such as the National Institute of Health.  These programs include:

 

 

·         Anatomy

·         Biochemistry

·         Biomedical Materials Science

·         Medical Pharmacology

·         Microbiology

·         Neuroscience

·         Pathology

·         Physiology & Biophysics

 

 

Our graduate faculty members are committed to providing an outstanding learning and research experience in areas such as cancer, heart diseases, neurological diseases, obesity, diabetes and infectious diseases. Moreover, the low faculty to student ratio ensures that students receive the mentoring they require for success in graduate school.

 

We are looking to recruit students, like yours, with undergraduate degrees in Biology.  All students who are accepted to our Ph.D. programs receive a highly competitive financial package from UMMC worth more than $135,000 over the typical five years of training.  This package includes a full tuition scholarship, a living allowance of approximately $24,150 per year, and medical insurance. The purpose of this support is to allow our students to focus entirely on their studies and research.  As a result, our students have enjoyed great success in finding positions after completing their graduate degrees.

 

If you have students who are interested in pursuing a career in biomedical research, please let them know about our programs.   For those who would like more information or to visit our campus, please feel free to contact me by email (mjryan@umc.edu) or by phone 601-984-1195You may also wish to visit our website: www.umc.edu/graduateschool for information about a specific program.  The application deadline for our programs is December 15, 2014.  This deadline provides sufficient time for us to plan our recruiting weekend that will take place in February 2015.

 

We look forward to assisting graduates of Christian Brothers University in the next phase of their educational training. Thank you for your time and consideration.

 

Sincerely Yours,

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Michael J. Ryan, Ph.D.

Associate Professor of Physiology & Biophysics

Associate Dean for Student Affairs

UMMC School of Graduate Studies in the Health Sciences

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2.  Only osteopathic physicians are trained and licensed to provide Osteopathic Manipulative Medicine (OMM). 

 

 

 

3.  ===AAMC STAT===, News from the Association of American Medical Colleges, November 9, 2014 edition.  

STAT Short, topical, and timely

News from the Association of American Medical Colleges

November 9, 2014

New York Teaching Hospital Recognized for Outstanding Community Service

NewYork-Presbyterian Hospital will receive the Spencer Foreman Award for Outstanding Community Service at Learn Serve Lead 2014: The AAMC Annual Meeting in Chicago on Nov. 9. Years before the Affordable Care Act, NewYork-Presbyterian Hospital (NYP) began pioneering models for accountable population-based health care in Washington Heights-Inwood, a predominantly underserved Hispanic neighborhood of more than 200,000. Today, NYP is refining its successful model for adaptability to neighborhoods across the United States. Integral to NYP's journey is its significant investment in the healthy future of neighborhood children and adolescents. In partnership with Columbia University Medical Center, NYP built a network of school-based health clinics that provide mental health and primary care services to more than 7,000 students.

Professors Honored for Contributions to Medical Student Education

The AAMC will honor four innovative medical school professors who have excelled in their field. The Alpha Omega Alpha Robert J. Glaser Distinguished Teacher Award will be given to Charles L. Bardes, M.D., professor of clinical medicine and associate dean of admissions at Weill Cornell Medical College; Bernard Karnath, M.D., professor for the Division of General Internal Medicine at the University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston; Randall King, M.D., Ph.D., Harry C. McKenzie Professor of Cell Biology at Harvard Medical School; and Emma Meagher, M.D., associate professor of medicine at Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania.

Physician Awarded for Humanism and Commitment to Global Health

Growing up in Indiana and Pakistan, Cynthia Haq, M.D., took great interest in people around her who were living in poverty. Today, at the University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health and around the world, she is known for her humanistic and compassionate care of medically underserved populations. Her commitment to improving global health is steadfast. Since her first job as a practicing physician, Dr. Haq has been committed to providing high-quality, patient-centered health care to the most marginalized world citizens, and she helped establish the first family medicine residency programs in Pakistan, Uganda, and Ethiopia. Today, she will receive the Arnold P. Gold Foundation Humanism in Medicine Award.

Internist to Receive Nickens Award for Health Equity Work

Lisa Cooper, M.D., M.P.H., revolutionized the nation's understanding of how race and ethnicity affect health and patient care. Through her work at Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, she has identified precise inequities in how racial and ethnic minority patients perceive their health care providers and access the health system. She also has worked diligently to achieve health parity by partnering with these minority populations on community-tailored solutions. The Liberian-born internist's passion for human dignity and equality began during childhood, when she was witness to and victim of discrimination and violence. Dr. Cooper remains a tireless and dedicated advocate for justice and human equality. For her outstanding efforts, she will receive the Herbert W. Nickens Award.

Dean Honored for Efforts to Improve Health of Medically Underserved

A. Eugene Washington, M.D., M.Sc., dean of David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, will receive the David E. Rogers Award today. Since 1979, Dr. Washington has coupled his passion for a better future in health and health care with his exceptional talents in clinical investigation, public policy, and leadership to improve the lives of millions of Americans, particularly the medically underserved. A quintessential public servant, he has worked to improve the nation's health by holding posts with the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, two academic health centers, and multiple professional and government boards and committees.

Scientist to Receive Award for Revolutionary Work in Cancer Research

As an adolescent, James P. Allison, Ph.D., was a fiercely inquisitive and challenging student—often arguing with his teachers on creationism. Fortunately, his natural inclinations were nurtured and he grew up to be a skilled scientist at The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center where his staunch determination has revolutionized cancer treatment. Dr. Allison's mother died of lymphoma when he was 11, he lost more than one uncle to cancer, and in 2005, his brother died of prostate cancer, a disease he himself has survived. His tenacity in discovering how science benefits the patient makes him a highly sought-after researcher. He will receive the Award for Distinguished Research in the Biomedical Sciences.

Dean Honored with Flexner Award for Pioneering Work in Medical Education

James O. Woolliscroft, M.D., has been leading medical education transformation for more than three decades. He quickly earned a reputation as a pioneer in medical education upon joining the University of Michigan Medical School faculty in 1980, where he now serves as dean and the Lyle C. Roll Professor of Medicine. Dr. Woolliscroft is a talented mentor who inspires in others a passion for educating. He was among the first to advocate for moving the paradigm of medical education from knowledge acquisition to performance-based metrics and champion community settings as core sites for training medical students. Today, he will receive the Abraham Flexner Award for Distinguished Service to Medical Education.

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4.  ===AAMC STAT===, News from the Association of American Medical Colleges, November 10, 2014 edition.  

STAT Short, topical, and timely

News from the Association of American Medical Colleges

November 10, 2014

AAMC Presidential Address: Resilience Will Drive Academic Medicine Forward

In his address at the 125th annual meeting of the AAMC, President and CEO Darrell G. Kirch, M.D., told the leaders of America's medical schools and teaching hospitals that resilience is an essential quality for the academic medical community as it grapples with the extreme challenges and demands ahead. "While most of us would say that medicine is the most gratifying, stimulating, and noble career a person can pursue, many of our colleagues are in genuine distress," he told nearly 3,500 meeting attendees. "Resilience is what drives us forward and inspires us to take on difficult challenges and to keep trying in the face of doubt and failure." Click here to view the full text of the AAMC president's annual meeting address, "Resilience."

Betz Delivers Address on Changing the Culture in the Learning Environment

A. Lorris Betz, M.D., Ph.D., chair of the AAMC Board of Directors, spoke during the association's annual meeting about the culture in the medical education learning environment. "Changing the culture of our organizations is not for the faint of heart. It takes the courage of leaders who must be persistent and consistent in pushing toward the goal. It takes the courage of faculty and staff to work together to find solutions to seemingly insolvable problems. It takes the courage of students and staff to identify people who are not on board with the program, and the courage to move them out." Betz encouraged attendees to create systems and establish policies to engage and motivate change in the nation's medical schools and teaching hospitals. Click here to view the full text of the AAMC chair's annual meeting address, "Courage."

Alan Alda Urges Empathy and Clarity for Effective Communication in Science and Medicine

Award-winning actor, writer, director, and science advocate, Alan Alda, led the opening plenary session, "Communicating Science, Advancing Medicine," at Learn Serve Lead 2014. His dynamic talk reflected his lifelong love of science and how a near-death experience inspired him to help scientists communicate effectively about scientific research. Founder of the Alan Alda Center for Communicating Science at Stony Brook University, Alda spoke of the importance of empathy and clarity as the basis for effective communication in science and medicine. "For public health to get better, it's essential for communication to get better." He also talked about using the skills of improvisation to teach doctors and scientists to distill their message and more directly communicate with patients. Prior to the meeting, Alda shared a preview of his presentation with the AAMC Reporter.

New Interactive Report on Diversity in the Physician Workforce

The 2014 edition of Diversity in the Physician Workforce: Facts & Figures, released at the AAMC annual meeting, is available now for the first time in an interactive online format. The report offers detailed statistical information on demographics and practice patterns of the physician workforce in the United States. The web-based report will allow users to view the data and trends in new ways, and includes an interactive map on physician race/ethnicity by state and county, population data, interactive tables and charts, and downloadable spreadsheets with raw data.

On the Move

William Ball, M.D., has been appointed University of Cincinnati (UC) interim vice president for health affairs and dean of the College of Medicine, effective Nov. 1, 2014. Ball currently serves as UC vice president for research and professor of radiology, biomedical engineering, and pediatrics. He succeeds Thomas Boat, M.D., who served as dean and vice president since July 1, 2011.


5.  AACOM (American Association of Colleges of Osteopathic Medicine) Information Alert:  2014 Midterm Election Update and AACOM Advocacy Efforts.  

 

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2014 Midterm Election Update and AACOM Advocacy Efforts

(November 7, 2014)  With the conclusion of the 2014 midterm elections, Republicans expanded their majority in the U.S. House of Representatives and captured enough seats in the U.S. Senate to tilt the balance of power in their favor as the new majority party.  Republicans gained formerly-held Democratic Senate seats in Arkansas, Colorado, Iowa, Montana, North Carolina, South Dakota, and West Virginia, and maintained seats in Georgia and Kentucky.  A runoff in Louisiana will take place on December 6 to determine whether Mary Landrieu returns to the Senate, and in Alaska, Senator Mark Begich (D) is trailing Republican Dan Sullivan, but state election officials are still counting absentee and questioned ballots.

Polling appeared to favor Republicans in the weeks and days leading up to the elections, but the results exceeded projections.  Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell defeated Alison Lundergan Grimes 56-40% in a race that many pollsters predicted would be much closer.  In Colorado, Republican Cory Gardner beat incumbent Mark Udall (D) by a margin of 49-45% - a strong showing in a race that was projected to be close.  While a few races are currently undetermined, so far Republicans have picked up seven Senate seats and gained 12 seats in the House.  The House balance is 243-181 and the Senate balance is currently 52-45 (presuming the independents continue to caucus with the Democrats). 

In the 114th Congress, House Ways and Means Committee Chairman Dave Camp (R-MI) will have retired, and current Budget Chairman Paul Ryan (R-WI) could potentially take over chairmanship of the committee.  Current Ways and Means Health Subcommittee Chairman Kevin Brady (R-TX) has also stated his run for Chairman.  Ranking Member Sander Levin (D-MI) is expected to retain his position, as is Health Subcommittee Ranking Member Jim McDermott (D-WA).  In addition, House Energy and Commerce Chairman Fred Upton (R-MI) is expected to retain his current position.

In the Senate, re-elected Senator Lamar Alexander (R-TN) is expected to become the  Chairman of the Health, Education, Labor and Pensions Committee, following the retirement of long-serving Senator Tom Harkin (D-IA).  Senator Patty Murray (D-WA) or Bernie Sanders (I-V) may become the Ranking Member.  Senator Orrin Hatch (R-UT) is expected to become the Chairman of the Senate Committee on Finance. 

View the list of COM Congressional Representation in the 114th Congress that will convene in January 2014.  Twelve COMs will have either a new House Member, Senator, or both.

As Congress reconvenes next week to wrap up the congressional year, many issues are outstanding.  Either a Continuing Resolution (CR) or an omnibus appropriations bill (or some combination of the two) to fund the federal government through the end of the current fiscal year must be passed.  The current CR expires on December 11.  Other issues potentially to be considered in the lame duck session include, but are not limited to: additional funding to fight Ebola in West Africa, tax extenders, and the authorization of military force to combat the Islamic State of Iraq and the Levant (ISIL).

During this time, AACOM will continue to advocate on public policy issues critical to osteopathic medical education. These priorities include strong support for both Medicare-funded graduate medical education (GME) and the Teaching Health Center GME Program; the reauthorization of the Higher Education Act and fiscally-responsible solutions to lower medical student debt; and federal funding for physician training and workforce programs that aim to address the country’s health care demands.  AACOM looks forward to working closely with the new Congress on behalf of osteopathic medical schools and the students they serve.

 

 

 

 

 

6.  AACOM (American Association of Colleges of Osteopathic Medicine) announces the launching of its new website, www.aacom.org .  

From Gina M. Moses, Associate Director of Recruitment and Application Services: 

After nearly eleven months of diligent work we are excited to unveil AACOM's new website and invite you to explore its many features!

* Mobile-friendly design: Our new website is completely mobile-friendly so you can easily view it on any device - desktop, laptop, tablet, or phone.

* Easier navigation: New, drop down 'mega' menus and targeted audience sections make it easier to find the information you want.

* A fresh, new look: You asked and we listened! The new site has a clean, uncluttered look, with more graphics, videos, and podcasts.

* Enhanced content: Content has been edited, enhanced, updated, and cross-posted throughout the site, to bring you timely, relevant, and easy-to-read information.

* Social media access: Quickly share content that interests you via email, Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn, or other social media, and read AACOM's current Twitter and Facebook postings in sections throughout the site.

* 'Add events' option: You can now add events from our website directly to your Outlook, Gmail, or iCal calendar.

* At your convenience, please take a few minutes to explore www.aacom.org and let us know what you think.  We hope you like it.

Please send comments or questions to Lisa Etienne, AACOM's Manager of Digital Initiatives, at letienne@aacom.org.

With all good wishes and thanks for your continued support!

Gina

 

 

Gina M. Moses, M.Ed.

Associate Director of Recruitment and Application Services

 

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American Association of Colleges of Osteopathic Medicine
5550 Friendship Blvd, Suite 310 | Chevy Chase, MD 20815 

p 301-968-4184  | f 301-968-4191

www.aacom.org | facebook | twitter

 

 

7.  Human Error Seeps into Electronic Medical Records, or, “Here’s another nice mess you’ve got me into…”  

Viewing this article from Medscape.com requires registration, but registration is free:

http://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/834566?nlid=69583_2981&src=wnl_edit_dail&uac=40240FX

 

 

8.  The Frontier Nursing Courier Internship Program, in existence since the 1920's, offers participants an opportunity to shadow healthcare practitioners in rural and underserved communities, learn about Appalachia, and grow personally.   

The Frontier Nursing Courier Internship Program, in existence since the 1920's, offers participants an opportunity to shadow healthcare practitioners in rural and underserved communities, learn about Appalachia, and grow personally.

 Applications for the summer 2015 program can be found at www.frontier.edu/courier

Nancy L. Reinhart, MPH, CD(DONA)
Courier Program Coordinator
132 FNS Drive, Wendover, KY 41775
(859) 899-2827
CELL: (502) 836-8100
FAX: (859) 899-2941

FRONTIER NURSING UNIVERSITY Courier Program
Visit, Learn more, Apply:  www.frontier.edu/courier

INTERNSHIP DESCRIPTION

Program Summary
The Courier internship program is a summertime internship distinguished by its legacy and the adventuresome nature of its site placements. Couriers will provide critical assistance to health clinics and birth centers in Appalachia. Eight week internships last from June 8 through August 1, 2015.

2015 Courier Program Internship Sites
Mary Breckinridge Big Creek and Beechfork Clinics, Hyden, KY;  Little Flower Clinic, Hazard, KY; The Hazard Clinic and Hospice of the Bluegrass, Hazard, KY;  Lisa Ross Birth Center, Knoxville, TN;  Women's Wellness and Maternity Birth Center and CHOTA, Madisonville, TN;  White House Clinic, McKee, KY.

Program History
In 1928, Mary Breckinridge, founder of Frontier Nursing University established the Courier Program, recruiting young people to come work in the Kentucky Mountains and learn about service to humanity. Couriers escorted guests safely through remote terrain, delivered medical supplies to remote outpost clinics, and helped nurse-midwives during home visits and births. Frontier has benefited tremendously from the 1500 Couriers who have served since 1928.


Career Pathways
Ideal for individuals interested in health-related careers. By participating, Couriers will gain:

     Insight into the healthcare sector and the challenges and opportunities of public health and primary care in rural and underserved communities

     Mentorship from nurses, nurse practitioners, doctors, social workers and / or nurse-midwives

     Personal growth including responsibility, accountability, and working in a team

     Experience working with diverse populations

     Reputable internship experience for resume building


Responsibilities & Duties
Responsibilities will vary by site.  Couriers will work approximately 30 hours per week at a clinical site and will also engage in the community through secondary projects each week. By the end of the internship, Couriers will:

     Participate in Courier bound orientation and Courier closing conference

     Complete a community health profile, paying particular attention to health equity issues

     Shadow clinicians in their work with patients

     Perform volunteer duties to meet critical clinical needs

     Assist in the clinics or other primary sites, helping administrative, management and staff teams as needed

     Engage directly with the community through secondary project(s)

     Present at least once about Frontier's mission and vision for rural health care and the purpose of the Courier Program

     Meet with Courier cluster (fellow Couriers living nearby) and submit weekly journal entries


Requirements & Qualifications
Successful applicants will be curious, adaptable, self-motivated and self-structured, have a commitment to respect and tolerance and be able to independently engage in unfamiliar situations. Strong written and verbal communication and computer skills are preferred. Applicants should be interested in learning about public health, health care, social work or a related field, share a commitment to Frontier’s mission of serving the rural and underserved and be ready for an adventure! Formal training in these fields is not required.

 

We prefer that applicants be at least 20 years of age and have completed two years of higher education. Personal transportation and a valid driver’s license is required. This is an unpaid position. Couriers will pay for their own transportation and a $1500 fee, which covers all housing, board and program costs.

Working Conditions & Environment
Couriers will be working in rural and underserved areas, at either small clinics or at birth centers. Some sites will be underdeveloped in terms of infrastructure and Couriers should expect below-average access to internet, food choices and other amenities typically associated with urban areas.

Each site varies in its level of structure and skill set desired. Successful applicants will be matched to sites in part based on their personal motivation level and skill set in addition to their personal preference.

It is likely that Couriers will be working and living with populations unlike their community of origin in respect to economics, race, religion and health status. They are expected to do so with respect and tolerance.

Couriers at outpost sites will mostly be living with families to gain an enriching cultural experience. Couriers based in Hyden and Hazard will be living at Frontier dormitories.  Couriers will report to on-site mentors and telephone or email access to their program supervisor, the FNU Courier Coordinator.

Couriers are expected to wear a uniform of khaki pants, shorts or skirts that come to the knee and white tops while engaged in Courier work. Two uniform white shirts will be provided, but Couriers are encouraged to bring additional white tops.
Hearts On, Hands Off Policy - Couriers are not, under any circumstances, to touch clients or provide any medical treatment whatsoever. Couriers are required to adhere to this approach with respect to all client interactions.

After the Work Day
After the work day is finished, Couriers are encouraged to explore the rich art, history and environment of the sites in which they will be staying. There will be ample time for hiking and exploration beyond the requirements of the position. Host families will be a great resource for recreational activities for outpost sites and FNU staff will provide such ideas to Couriers staying at Wendover.

*Frontier Nursing University Mission: To educate nurses to become competent, entrepreneurial, ethical and compassionate nurse-midwives and nurse practitioners who are leaders in the primary care of women and families with an emphasis on underserved and rural populations.

Visit www.frontier.edu/Courier to apply by February 13, 2015.  Phone interviews will take place in February and successful applicants will be notified by March 1, 2015.                                                          

 

 

 

 

9.  The University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center (Dallas) offers 4 summer undergraduate research programs. 

Dear Friends and Colleagues-

Greetings from Dallas, Texas! I am writing to tell you about four summer undergraduate research programs at UT Southwestern Medical Center. For the 22nd consecutive year, UT Southwestern Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences is sponsoring the Summer Undergraduate Research Fellowship (SURF) Program. The goal of SURF is to give 75 students an intensive, 10-week research experience in a world class research environment. Students immerse themselves in the laboratory and work on individual research projects with UT Southwestern Graduate School faculty. Most areas of modern biomedical engineering, cancer biology, cell biology, molecular biology, biochemistry, genetics, immunology, microbiology, neuroscience, and pharmacology are represented. In addition to research, SURF provides seminars, optional classes in Cancer Biology and Genetics, social events, and an end-of-program poster session. The SURF website and on-line application can be found at www.utsouthwestern.edu/SURF.

For the 11th year, we are also sponsoring the Quantitative and Physical Science Summer Undergraduate Research Fellowship
(QP-SURF) Program
. This program, initially funded by a NIGMS training grant and now funded internally, will accept 10 students who are earning their undergraduate degrees in the field of biomedical engineering, mathematics, computer science, physics, or chemistry. The goal of QP-SURF is to give students an intensive, research experience and demonstrate to students in the physical and quantitative sciences how their knowledge and skill sets are applied in a biomedical research setting. QP-SURF students would carry out their 10-week research project in a biomedical engineering, biophysics, computational biology, or quantitative/analytical chemistry laboratory. QP-SURF students also participate in seminars, optional classes in Cancer Biology and Genetics, social events, and an end-of-program poster session. The program website and on-line application for QP-SURF can be found at www.utsouthwestern.edu/QP-SURF. For the 3rd year, we are highlighting opportunities for undergraduates interested in research at the interface between chemistry and basic biomedical research. We hope you will bring the QP-SURF Chemistry program to the attention of your chemistry students.

For the first time, we are also sponsoring the Summer Undergraduate Research Institution for the Study of Kidney Disease (SURISKD) Program. This program is funded by a National Institute of health and National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (NIHIDDKD) training grant and will accept 15 students who are earning their undergraduate degrees in the field of natural sciences. The goal of SURISKD is to give students an intensive summer research training experience for college students who are preparing for Ph.D. or M.D./Ph.D. careers in kidney-related research. SURISKD spend 10-weeks pursuing individual research projects that range from embryonic development and physiology to kidney cancer and imaging in the laboratories of Graduate School faculty members. The SURISKD website and on-line application can be found at www.utsouthwestern.edu/SURISKD.

All three summer programs will run from June 1st through August 7th, 2015.  Participants will be selected based on their letters of reference, course work, and experience. The stipend for the 10-week program is $4,000. If a fellow requires housing, the costs will be covered by the program; however, fellows are responsible for paying their own travel expenses. Application deadline is February 9, 2015.

I would greatly appreciate it if you would share these summer opportunities with your students! The value of this summer opportunity is great for those interested in careers in research. Previous fellows have been enthusiastic about their experience; most have enrolled in excellent Ph.D. or M.D./Ph.D. programs.

I also want to update you on some recent changes with the Division of Basic Science Ph.D program. We have successfully shifted all Ph.D. coursework to year one of our program; therefore, Ph.D. students are in the lab full-time after one year of classes. Our goal is to train students to think as independent research scientists and we believe this goal can be best achieved in the laboratory! If you have students interested in pursuing a PhD in the biomedical sciences, I hope they will visit our website (www.utsouthwestern.edu/gradschool) and learn about our PhD umbrella program.

Best wishes for a great Fall 2014!

Regards,

Nancy

 

Nancy E. Street, PhD

Associate Dean, Southwestern Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences

UT Southwestern Medical Center at Dallas

5323 Harry Hines Blvd

Dallas, TX 75390-9004

214-633-1312

Nancy.street@utsouthwestern.edu

 

www.utsouthwestern.edu/gradschool

 

 

10.  Syracuse University offers graduate degrees in Forensic Science at The Forensic and National Security Sciences Institute. 

 

11.  The National Institutes of Health (NIH) announced a new NIH-Amgen program intended for undergraduate students interested in PhD and combined degree programs in the sciences.  

The NIH announced today the summer research program that will provide hands-on laboratory experience for students interested in PhD and combined degree programs in the sciences. The full program announcement is below.

 

Please note: “The NIH-Amgen program is for undergraduate students interested in PhD and combined degree programs in the sciences..   ..Students with experience with health disparities and a keen interest in learning more about the biological, environmental, social, and genetic causes of health disparities are especially encouraged to apply. The NIH-Amgen Scholars Program admission committee will give preference to students who lack opportunities to perform independent research during the school year. We welcome applications from students in all science disciplines and encourage students from diverse backgrounds to apply.”

 

Irena Tartakovsky, M.D., M.S.

Manager, Science Policy

Association of American Medical Colleges

Tel: 202-862-6134

itartakovsky@aamc.org

 

2015 NIH-AMGEN Scholars Program.

IMPORTANT NOTE: Applicants to the NIH-Amgen Scholars Program will complete the application for the NIH Summer Internship Program (SIP). This online application will be available on November 15.

The Amgen Foundation, the Foundation for the NIH and the NIH Office of Intramural Training & Education are pleased to announce the 2015 NIH-Amgen Scholars Program. NIH-Amgen Scholars will spend the summer working at the NIH side-by-side with some of the leading scientists in the world, in an environment devoted exclusively to biomedical research.

NIH-Amgen scholars will be immersed in a culture of translational science and will explore important elements of the basic, translational and clinical research enterprise. Scholars will be matched with research mentors in the Intramural Research Program (IRP) on the main NIH campus in Bethesda, Maryland. In addition to performing full-time research, NIH-Amgen Scholars will:

§  Participate in a customized curriculum that will use journal clubs, case studies, and group activities to develop communication, career readiness, and critical thinking skills.

§  Explore the relationship between science and society in evening roundtables that examine the role of science, policy, and community engagement in the elimination of health disparities (for a definition of health disparities, visit the NIH-Amgen Scholars Program FAQs).

§  Participate in a leadership development program focused on self-exploration, building resiliency, understanding conflict, finding mentors, and understanding emotional intelligence.

§  Attend the Amgen Scholars US Symposium in California in July to interact with top industry and academic scientists and to network with other Amgen Scholars.

§  Present at the NIH Summer Poster Day in August.

§  Establish an individualized development plan to take advantage of the many workshops and seminars offered for all NIH summer interns. These include our summer lecture series, "Going to Graduate School" series, communication skills workshops, and the NIH Graduate & Professional School Fair.

The NIH-Amgen Scholars Program will begin with a week-long orientation and leadership training program. Program participants will meet weekly for program activities throughout the summer.

NIH Amgen-Scholars will receive a monthly stipend and Transhare benefits for travel within the Metro DC area (Transhare is a transportation subsidy provided to individuals who agree to use any form of public transportation and not their car to get to work.). Housing and travel support for all NIH-Amgen Scholars will be arranged by the Foundation for the NIH.

Eligibility

The NIH-Amgen program is for undergraduate students interested in PhD and combined degree programs in the sciences. Students interested in attending medical or other professional school programs should apply to the broader NIH Summer Internship Program. Students with experience with health disparities and a keen interest in learning more about the biological, environmental, social, and genetic causes of health disparities are especially encouraged to apply. The NIH-Amgen Scholars Program admission committee will give preference to students who lack opportunities to perform independent research during the school year. We welcome applications from students in all science disciplines and encourage students from diverse backgrounds to apply.

In addition, applicants must:

§  Be U.S. citizens or permanent residents.

§  Be enrolled for Fall 2015 in a four-year college or university in the U.S., Puerto Rico, or other US territory.

§  Be a rising junior or senior (including fifth-year seniors). Transfer students from community colleges should contact us for advice on applying to the Community College Summer Enrichment Program (CCSEP).

§  Have a cumulative GPA of 3.2 or higher (4.0 scale).

Individuals who have earned a baccalaureate degree, students who are not currently enrolled at a U.S. institution, and previous Amgen Scholars are not eligible to apply.

Application Process

Applicants should complete the standard NIH Summer Internship Program (SIP) application and choose NIH-Amgen Scholars Program from the drop-down menu in item 9. Applicants should discuss three important elements in the application cover letter:

§  Research interests and educational/career goals for the future

§  Understanding of, experience with, and interest in learning more about health disparities; we are interested in learning about personal, coursework-related, or community-based experiences that have increased your interest in health disparities.

§  Leadership experiences in school and in the community

The application deadline for this program is February 2nd, 2015 at 11:59 pm EST. The full application package, including reference letters, must be completed at this time for applicants to be considered for the program.

How the Program Works

The selection committee will review applications to the Amgen-NIH Scholars Program, and applicants will be informed of the committee's decisions by the end of February. Applicants who are not selected for the Amgen-NIH Scholars Program will be released into the general pool of applicants for the NIH Summer Internship Program and will be advised about the selection process for SIP to maximize their chances of admission.

Individuals who are selected as Amgen-NIH Scholars, will be matched by the program with NIH intramural scientists who have been selected to host program participants. Every effort will be made to place students in research groups related to their research interests. Applicants to the program should not contact NIH intramural scientists to discuss placements on their own.

All Amgen-NIH Scholars must be on campus from June 8th to August 14th, 2015. Summer internships are full-time positions; interns are expected to devote a minimum of 40 hours per week to their projects and training. Students should not, therefore, expect to take courses during the daytime. Furthermore, they should not make plans for evening coursework or volunteer activities before speaking to program staff.

 

 

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Sent: Wednesday, November 12, 2014 10:08 AM
To: Irena Tartakovsky
Subject: NIH, Amgen Foundation and the Foundation for the NIH announce collaboration to support undergraduate research opportunities

 

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NIH, Amgen Foundation and the Foundation for the NIH announce collaboration to support undergraduate research opportunities

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Summer research program provides hands-on laboratory experience.


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http://ih.constantcontact.com/fs134/1105132857422/img/665.jpgDear Stan, 
 
Gap Medics is the world’s largest provider of international pre-health clinical experience, specializing in short-term hospital shadowing internships.
 
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Kind regards,
Joe Lanzarin
Student Placement Manager

Gap Medics - Launching medical careers
(415) 361-4076
joe@gapmedics.com

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Copyright © 2014 Gap Medics, All rights reserved.

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Our mailing address is:

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One Market Street

Spear Tower, Suite 3600

San Francisco, CA 94105


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Preprofessional Health Programs
Biology Department
Christian Brothers University
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