Christian Brothers University

www.cbu.edu

Caduceus Newsletter:  Fall 2013.15, Week of Nov. 25

CaduceusDNAHelixLarger

Image from the U.S. Department of Energy Genome Program web site:   http://genomics.energy.gov  

Dr. Stan Eisen, Director
Preprofessional Health Programs
Christian Brothers University

650 East Parkway South
Memphis, TN  38104

Home page:
http://facstaff.cbu.edu/~seisen/ 

Caduceus Newsletter Archives:
http://facstaff.cbu.edu/~seisen/Caduceus.html

 

Q:  Are the $1 recyclable cups sold by Starbucks microwaveable?

 

cid:image001.jpg@01CEE154.4186AA50

 

To find out the results of an experiment, please go to Marginalia II. 

 

Table of Contents:

 

1.  Events coming up.  
2.  ===AAMC STAT===, News from the Association of American Medical Colleges, November 18, 2013 issue. 
3.  Tufts University School of Medicine offers a variety of public health and professional degree programs. 
4.  Record Number of Med Students, but More Needed to Help Physician Shortage, from Medscape.com, http://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/813306    . 
5.  The Medical School for International Health, a joint venture of Columbia University (New York City) and Ben-Gurion University (Beersheva, Israel) is a four-year, North American-style medical school that incorporates global health coursework into all four years of the medical school curriculum  
6.  The November/December 2013 issue of University of Tennessee College of Pharmacy (UTCOP) News is on the WWW.  
7.  More “Well, DUH!” science:  Study Finds Aerobic Exercise Improves Memory, Brain Function and Physical Fitness.   

8.  Marginalia I:  I know this is a minority opinion, but there is way-y-y-y-y too much publicity being given to the fact that Chanukah coincides with Thanksgiving this year.       
9.  Marginalia II:  This, too, is SCIENCE!  Are the $1 recyclable coffee cups sold by Starbucks microwaveable?  Curious minds wanna know.   

 

1.  Events coming up.  

·         December 16 – 31:  Career Services Winter Break Externships -- Check your email for externship sites

 

2.  ===AAMC STAT===, News from the Association of American Medical Colleges, November 18, 2013 issue. 

http://www.aamc.org/em/lyris/images/stat.jpg

News from the Association of American Medical Colleges

November 18, 2013

• Highlights from Learn • Serve • Lead: The AAMC 2013 Annual Meeting
• Academic Medicine and Health Affairs Hold Workforce Briefing
• New Data on Impact of Racial and Ethnic Minority Physicians
• 2013 Medical Education Debt and Tuition Fact Card Available
• Survey Details Impact of Sequestration on Research Universities
• In Memoriam: E. Grey Dimond, M.D.
• On the Move



Highlights from Learn • Serve • Lead: The AAMC 2013 Annual Meeting

Recorded content from the plenaries and other major sessions at the AAMC 2013 Annual Meeting are now available. Video and transcripts of speeches by AAMC President and CEO Darrell G. Kirch, M.D., and Chair Valerie N. Williams, Ph.D., M.P.A., are posted on a page that includes content from most major sessions. Presentations by Ian Morrison, Ph.D., Daphne Koller, Ph.D., Anna Quindlen, and Jeffrey Brenner, M.D., are just some of the highlights available. The AAMC also has developed a new video to explain how the meeting will be enhanced and what changes attendees can expect in 2014.


Academic Medicine and Health Affairs Hold Workforce Briefing

Academic Medicine, the AAMC’s journal, and Health Affairs held a briefing last week to discuss a collection of articles about training the health care workforce for the future. The special theme issue was produced jointly by both journals and covers topics ranging from graduate medical education (GME) to new models of care delivery. Reps. Allyson Schwartz (D-Pa.) and Aaron Schock (R-Ill.) also spoke about legislation to support more GME slots and efforts to fix the sustainable growth rate formula. All the Academic Medicine articles are now accessible at www.academicmedicine.org.


New Data on Impact of Racial and Ethnic Minority Physicians

Despite the increasing demographic shift toward diversity in the United States, physicians from racial and ethnic minority backgrounds continue to be underrepresented in the workforce, according to the November Diversity Data Snapshots. The data include maps detailing the geographical impact of racial and ethnic minority primary care physicians and demonstrate the effect these physicians have on overall access to care.


2013 Medical Education Debt and Tuition Fact Card Available

The median level of medical student debt rose 3 percent to $175,000 in 2013, according to annual AAMC data on debt and tuition. The data present updated figures on student debt and tuition and fees from private and public institutions as well as resident stipend information and sample loan repayment programs.


Survey Details Impact of Sequestration Cuts on Research

A recent survey examines the effects of seven months of sequestration cuts on research at nearly 300 higher education institutions, including 171 research universities. Seventy percent of respondents cited a reduction in the number of new federal research grants and delayed research projects as the most common impact of the cuts. Information also was collected on the financial costs and effects on jobs and careers. The survey was sponsored by the Association of American Universities, the Association of Public and Land-grant Universities, and The Science Coalition.


In Memoriam: E. Grey Dimond, M.D.

E. Grey Dimond, M.D., founder of the University of Missouri-Kansas City (UMKC) School of Medicine, died Nov. 3 at the age of 94. A
national medical education consultant and the former chair of the University of Kansas Department of Medicine, Dimond was recruited to start UMKC's School of Medicine, which was founded in 1971. He modeled the curriculum at the school after his own accelerated education during World War II. Students followed an intensive six-year program and had contact with patients almost from the start of their education. The same year the School of Medicine was founded, Dimond was one of a handful of physicians invited to visit post-Communist China. During his career, he travelled extensively to China to work on initiatives to bridge relations with the United States. He was a cardiologist, educator, and author of 18 books.
 

On the Move

Jay Brooks Jackson, M.D., was named the new dean of the University of Minnesota Medical School and vice president of Health Sciences. Jackson was director of pathology at Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine for the past 12 years. He will begin his new position in February. Jackson replaces Aaron Friedman, M.D., who announced in February that he would step down at the end of the year.

President Obama will nominate Vivek Murthy, M.D., M.B.A., as the next Surgeon General of the United States. Murthy is co-founder and president of Doctors for America. He is also a hospitalist attending physician and instructor in medicine at Brigham and Women’s Hospital at Harvard Medical School.

 

 

3.  Tufts University School of Medicine offers a variety of public health and professional degree programs. 

This email is a paid announcement being sent as a service to the Tufts University School of Medicine. Please direct your inquiries to them.

http://ih.constantcontact.com/fs134/1105132857422/img/306.jpg

 

Hello,

http://ih.constantcontact.com/fs134/1105132857422/img/307.jpgThe Tufts University School of Medicine's Public Health and Professional Degree Programs (PHPD) is seeking to recruit students or health care professionals who may have an interest in public health, health communication, pain related policy, or health care. If your students are interested in making a difference by protecting and promoting the health of human populations, then a master's degree from a national leader in medical education - Tufts University School of Medicine - can help accomplish this goal. Our programs provide an interdisciplinary education that can be put to work to address some of today's public health challenges - famine, obesity, bioterrorism, health care system, emerging diseases, public health preparedness, pain related policy and physician patient communication.

 

Our Class Size

https://imgssl.constantcontact.com/letters/images/1101101060094/hisp-event1-bcrnr.gif

http://ih.constantcontact.com/fs134/1105132857422/img/308.jpgOur small class sizes allow students to get to know each other and interact more closely with professors. Students will have the opportunity to attend classes with peers in other public health programs and their perspectives will further enrich their education.

 

 

Our Faculty

https://imgssl.constantcontact.com/letters/images/1101101060094/hisp-event1-bcrnr.gif

http://ih.constantcontact.com/fs134/1105132857422/img/312.jpgOur faculty are working public health and healthcare practitioners, who are open to involving your students in their diverse research areas.  We have a mix of resident and adjunct faculty that includes public health practitioners, nutritionist, engineers, and physicians who are accessible and responsive to the needs of a graduate student. Additionally, your students will have the opportunity to cultivate connections with one of the many health or service agencies affiliated with our programs.  

 

 

Career Services

https://imgssl.constantcontact.com/letters/images/1101101060094/hisp-event1-bcrnr.gif

http://ih.constantcontact.com/fs134/1105132857422/img/313.jpgYour students will have access to a Career Services Office whose mission is to support students and alumni in their goal for meaningful careers through education, coaching, and building career connections. Therefore, there are resources to help achieve career paths similar to alumni that include policy analyst, project manager/director, epidemiologist, nutritionist, clinical study manager, research associate, communications specialist, and health officer, to name a few.  

 

Our City

https://imgssl.constantcontact.com/letters/images/1101101060094/hisp-event1-bcrnr.gif

http://ih.constantcontact.com/fs134/1105132857422/img/310.jpgTufts University School of Medicine is conveniently located in downtown Boston in the heart of the Theatre District and Chinatown. Boston is an exciting city that is home to some of the country's best health care providers with world-renowned hospitals and a wealth of health care agencies and community health centers, many of which are partners of Tufts School of Medicine. The city hosts several health-care conferences a year and is home to some of the most dynamic and innovative research happening today in the medical and healthcare industries. 

 

 

For more information

https://imgssl.constantcontact.com/letters/images/1101101060094/hisp-event1-bcrnr.gif

For more information about Tufts University School of Medicine's Public Health and Professional Degree Programs, please click here to visit our web site or contact the Admissions Office at (617) 636-0935 or by email.   

 

We look forward to hearing from you!   

 

Sincerely,

Aviva Must, Ph.D.

Dean, Public Health and Professional Degree Programs

 

4.  Record Number of Med Students, but More Needed to Help Physician Shortage, from Medscape.com, http://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/813306    . 

Record Number of Med Students, but More Needed to Help Physician Shortage

Joanna Broder

October 29, 2013

Despite record numbers of students applying to medical schools in 2012-2013 and enrolling this year, the United States still faces an impending physician shortage if Congress does not raise caps on residency funding, the Association of American Medical Colleges (AAMC) announced today.

Medical schools have done their part to expand enrollment, AAMC President and Chief Executive Officer Darrell Kirch, MD, said in a teleconference yesterday, and new medical schools have opened, making room for more students. Likewise, 48,014 students applied to medical school last year, with the number of first-time enrollees in US medical schools at an all-time high of 20,055.

"So the students have stepped up and done their part. The medical schools have responded quickly and with clarity, and now Congress needs to do its part and lift this 16-year-old ban on the number of training positions," Dr. Kirch said.

In 1997, as part of the Balanced Budget Act, the government limited Medicare funding of graduate medical education at 1996 levels for most teaching hospitals.

Today, teaching hospitals still face restrictions on their ability to develop or expand new programs, according to written workforce policy recommendations from the AAMC.

If Congress does not raise the caps, "we could face serious shortages of physicians across the board, geographically and across specialties," Dr. Kirch said. "This will not be an isolated problem. It will be a crisis for our nation."

He went on to praise students who applied to and enrolled in US medical schools in record numbers despite the prospects of staggering debt and no guarantee of attaining postmedical education in the form of a residency.

They are every bit as qualified as previous groups of applicants, with an average grade point average of 3.5 and a combined, median MCAT score of 29, Dr. Kirch said. Three quarters of the applicants also reported research experience, and two thirds said they had performed voluntary community service.

"Despite what you may hear from some quarters whether the future of medicine looks bright, college students, people out in the workforce are voting with their feet and saying that medicine as a career is an extremely attractive career choice," Dr. Kirch said, adding, "and these are our nation's best and brightest on multiple dimensions."

He highlighted demographic information about the 2012-2013 medical school applicant pool as well as those who chose to enroll for the first time this year.

The 48,014 students applied to US medical schools last year constituted a 6.1% increase from the previous year. The 20,055 who enrolled for the first time were a 2.8% increase over last year.

"Looking at the overall picture, the thing that has struck me so strongly is that both the number of applicants and the actual number of enrollees in medical schools is at an all-time high," Dr. Kirch said. "We haven't seen a level like this since 1996."

Women applying for the first time to medical school increased by 1102 (6.9%) compared with 2011-2012.

The number of Hispanics/Latinos enrolling in medical school for the first time was 1826, which is an increase of 5.5% over the previous year. This figure might not accurately reflect the percentage change, however, because the AAMC changed its methodology for reporting race and ethnicity this year, Dr. Kirch noted.

"We think that is a function of a lot of outreach on the part of our member schools and also their growing...attention to holistic review of applications, and really looking at what sort of cultural competence does an applicant bring to the table when they're going to be working in this very multicultural nation that we have," Dr. Kirch said.

More students applied to and enrolled in medical school in 2012-2013 than the previous year despite not being guaranteed a residency position after graduation and the prospect of having enormous debt — approximately $170,000, according to Dr. Kirch — upon graduation.

Students applying to medical school know what they will likely face in student debt upon graduation, Dr. Kirch said, "but they have faith that the career will be gratifying and that the career will support them adequately financially."

In March 2013, there were "a significant number" of newly graduated medical students who did not match to a residency program, Dr. Kirch pointed out.

There are "roughly" 28,500 first-year residency positions, and graduates from US medical schools must compete for them with graduates from US osteopathic schools and foreign medical schools, many of whom are US citizens, as well as physicians from other countries.

AAMC Calls for US to Fund More Residencies

"[I]f things continue with the rate they are, at some point in the next 2 years it's likely that MDs will surpass the number of available [residency] slots," he said.

Dr. Kirch added that students know about federal residency caps. Medical students are "some of the strongest advocates, telling Congress this is not a place where inaction and kicking the can down the road serves the nation at all."

The nation faces a shortage of more than 90,000 physicians by the end of the decade, according to an AAMC press release, and 60,000 as early as 2015, Atul Grover, MD, AAMC's chief public policy analyst, said in a telephone interview. Meanwhile, there are currently spot shortages of physicians in rural areas and underserved, urban areas, he noted.

Dr. Kirch said there are bills in front of both houses of Congress now to raise the cap and provide more residency slots, but if those do not pass, the physician shortage could become real.

"What we're really asking for is for the federal government to resume paying its fair share of the cost of the training," Dr. Grover specified.

He called for Medicare to contribute a billion dollars a year to train an additional 4000 residents and to help provide the other unique clinical services only available at teaching hospitals.

Medicare contributes a small portion of funding for graduate medical education. Most of the funding comes from revenue of faculty, teaching hospitals, and health systems, along with some revenue from the Veterans Administration, the US Public Health Service, and Medicaid, Dr. Grover said.

"Four thousand physicians a year could go a great distance toward alleviating the shortage," Dr. Kirch said.

Congress will have to act sooner or later, he said. "What we want is to spare the country from the pain and the dislocation of acting later rather than sooner, but failure is not an option for each and every one of us as patients."

In 2006, predicting an impending physician shortage, the AAMC called for increasing US medical school enrollment by 30% by 2020.

Dr. Kirch said that the nation is on track to meet the 30% increased enrollment goal by 2017. Medical schools have stepped up their efforts to accommodate training more students. In addition, 4 new medical schools opened their doors in 2013, including Central Michigan University College of Medicine, Mt. Pleasant; University of California, Riverside, School of Medicine; University of Arizona College of Medicine Phoenix; and the Frank H. Netter MD School of Medicine at Quinnipiac University, North Haven, Connecticut.

"But this will not, not, not alleviate the doctor shortage unless we have a corresponding increase in residency training positions," Dr. Kirch said.

 

Medscape Medical News © 2013  WebMD, LLC

Send comments and news tips to news@medscape.net.

Cite this article: Record Number of Med Students, but More Needed to Help Physician Shortage. Medscape. Oct 29, 2013.

 

 

5.  The Medical School for International Health, a joint venture of Columbia University (New York City) and Ben-Gurion University (Beersheva, Israel) is a four-year, North American-style medical school that incorporates global health coursework into all four years of the medical school curriculum.   

cid:image001.jpg@01CEE47C.EC309E90

 

 

Dear Colleague,

 

Five first-year medical students in the entering class of 2013 at the MSIH were awarded four-year scholarships, in recognition of their academic accomplishments and global health activities. In addition, another seven first-year students received significant stipends to cover fifteen percent of their tuition. 

 

We are pleased to announce that this year we will also be awarding significant tuition scholarships, as well as a number of stipends to assist students in pursuing their medical degrees.  Over 30% of the entering class of 2013 received scholarships and stipends.

 

To be eligible,  applicants must have sent a completed application for admission (with transcripts, MCAT scores, and letters of recommendation) to the NY Admissions Office for receipt by February 1st, 2014.

 

The cost of attendance at the MSIH for the 2013-14 academic year is $58,000, which is comparable to the cost of a public medical school in the United States.

 

Two of the 2013 Scholarship Fund awardees are Kristie Hadley and Reva Frankel.  Kristie Hadley, a graduate of Loyola University New Orleans, was awarded a half-tuition, four-year scholarship for her extensive global health experience while working in Guatemala as a translator for the Pop Wuj community clinic. Ms. Hadley, who was an Ignatian scholar at Loyola, holds a degree in Sociology with a minor in both Women’s Studies and Pre-medical studies.

 

Reva Frankel was awarded a four-year, quarter tuition scholarship for her wide-range of community service and global health volunteer activities, which include her work with the Jewish Disaster Response Corps, assisting victims of two devastating tornados in Yazoo, Mississippi, and with the Foundation for the International Medical Relief of Children (FIMRC), where she worked in a clinic in Costa Rica. She is a graduate of New York University.

 

The Medical School for International Health is a four-year, North American-style medical school that incorporates global health coursework into all four years of the medical school curriculum.  The MSIH prepares physicians to address the impact of cultural, economic, political and environmental factors on the health of individuals and populations worldwide. 

 

The recruitment of outstanding applicants who seek medical careers involving diverse and under-served communities around the world is a cornerstone of the MSIH mission. 

 

Should you, or a student from your institution, be interested in the Medical School for International Health, please contact the MSIH Admissions Office at (212) 305-9587, visit our website at http://cumc.columbia.edu/dept/bgcu-md, or view the first-year medical student blog http://firstyearmsih.blogspot.com.   I have also included a copy of our application for your convenience.

 

Sincerely,

      

Kelly A Coleman

 

Kelly A. Coleman, MBA

Recruitment Coordinator

Medical School for International Health

Kac2223@columbia.edu

Phone 212-305-9587

 

 

6.  The November/December 2013 issue of University of Tennessee College of Pharmacy (UTCOP) News is on the WWW.  

 Take a look at UTCOP News November/December 2013 to see the latest accomplishments of our students, alumni, faculty and staff!

 

Inside this issue

·         Phelps Wins ACCP Education Award

·         100% NAPLEX Pass Rate for Class of 2013

·         Carter DHHS/White House Champion of Change

·         Evans Appointed to BPS Board of Directors

·         Howze ACCP Best Student Poster Finalist

·         Ryman ACCP Student and Trainee Award Winner

·         Xiao Wins MALTO Podium Presentation Award

·         Benge, Gilliland, Oliphant, Vinson Preceptors of the Year

·         Dollars & Sense - New Personal Finance Series

·         Alumni Weekend November 7-9th

·         Much more!

 

Debbie C. Byrd, PharmD, BCPS

Professor of Clinical Pharmacy and

Associate Dean, Professional Affairs

1924 Alcoa Highway, Box 117

Knoxville, TN 37920

865.974.2398

dbyrd4@uthsc.edu

 

 

7.  More “Well, DUH!” science:  Study Finds Aerobic Exercise Improves Memory, Brain Function and Physical Fitness.   

Study Finds Aerobic Exercise Improves Memory, Brain Function And Physical Fitness

Posted: November 13, 2013
http://www.biocompare.com/Life-Science-News/150076-Study-Finds-Aerobic-Exercise-Improves-Memory-Brain-Function-And-Physical-Fitness/

 

 

8.  Marginalia I:  I know this is a minority opinion, but there is way-y-y-y-y too much publicity being given to the fact that Chanukah coincides with Thanksgiving this year.       

Don’t believe me?  Please go to http://www.kansascity.com/2013/11/11/4614193/this-year-thanksgiving-hanukkah.html

The original American Gothic painting

What some graphic artist has done to American Gothic -- Oy!

 

9.  Marginalia II:  This, too, is SCIENCE!  Are the $1 recyclable coffee cups sold by Starbucks microwaveable?  Curious minds wanna know.   

Last week, I visited the Starbucks at Germantown Road and Trinity, and noticed that they sell recyclable coffee cups for $1.  I asked the saleswoman whether these cups were microwaveable, and she didn’t know, nor was there any indication on the cup itself or on the package that the cups came in.  For that reason, I decided to conduct an experiment to see for myself, with the following protocol:

 

·         I added 10 ounces of cold coffee

·         Set the microwave for 2 minutes at high power

·         Photographed the cup prior to turning on the microwave

·         Photographed the cup and 30 and 60 second intervals

·         Photographed the cup at the end of 2 minutes

 

Here are the results:

 

Results of Microwave Experiment

Initial Conditions:  10 oz of cold coffee

cid:image001.jpg@01CEE154.4186AA50

After 30 seconds of microwaving

cid:image002.jpg@01CEE154.4186AA50

 

After 60 seconds of microwaving

cid:image003.jpg@01CEE154.4186AA50

After 2 minutes of microwaving

cid:image004.jpg@01CEE154.4186AA50

Inspection suggests that the recyclable cup is intact after 2 minutes of microwaving

cid:image005.jpg@01CEE154.4186AA50

 

The coffee had turned hot inside, and the cup appeared intact.   I was unable to determine whether any of the material that composed the cup had leached into the coffee, but I could not detect any change in flavor.

 

SO, in case anybody else asks whether the cups are microwaveable, you can show that person these photos.

 

(N.B.:  I don’t know whether this research is Nobel-eligible in physics, chemistry, physiology or medicine, but I will certainly let you know if and when I find out.)

Dr. Stan Eisen, Director
Preprofessional Health Programs
Biology Department
Christian Brothers University

650 East Parkway South
Memphis, TN 38104

E-mail: seisen@cbu.edu
http://www.cbu.edu/~seisen/
Caduceus Newsletter Archives: http://www.cbu.edu/~seisen/Caduceus.html