BIOL 109: Human Biology Lecture
Fall 2006
Course Description and Schedule
Dr. Stan Eisen

Office: S203B
Telephone #: 3447

            BIOL 109 is a survey of the human organism designed for non-majors. Topics covered include cytology, cellular biology, genetics, anatomy and physiology, development, evolution and ecology.

Regarding the Lecture Part

Required Textbook: Human Biology, by Mader, 2000, ed. 9

            Grading Protocol: Your grade will be based on the following:

            1) Four semester exams. Each test is comprehensive and will include multiple-choice, short answer, and essay questions. You will be allowed to take the entire period to complete the exam. Each exam will be worth 1/7 of your final grade;

            2) A term paper, based on Al Gore’s An Inconvenient Truth.  This term paper will be worth 1/7 of your final grade.

            2) A comprehensive final exam scheduled during the final exam week. It will consist solely of multiple-choice and short answer questions, and will be worth 2/7 of your final grade, i.e. double the value of a semester exam.

GRADING SUMMARY FOR LECTURE

A = 3.5 - 4.0
B = 2.75 - 3.49
C = 2.00 - 2.74
D = 1.00 - 1.99
F < 1.00

            Class Attendance Policy for the Lecture: The Student Handbook states the following: "Every student is expected to attend classroom and laboratory periods regularly. A student who has been absent, even for a legitimate cause, is under obligation to make up the work. Any student who has missed a total of 8 hours of class may be dropped from the course, with a mark of 'F', at the discretion of the teacher."

BIOL 109 LECTURE SCHEDULE FOR FALL 2006

Week

Day

Date

Lecture Topic

Chapter

1

M

8/21

Cells
http://www.cbu.edu/~seisen/EukaryoticCellStructure.htm

3.1-3.2

 

W

8/23

Principles of Chemistry
http://www.cbu.edu/~seisen/BasicChemistry.htm
http://www.cbu.edu/~seisen/PropertiesOfWater.htm

2.1-2.3

 

F

8/25

Organic compounds
http://www.cbu.edu/~seisen/OrganicChemistry.htm

2.4-2.7

2

M

8/28

Transport across membranes
http://www.cbu.edu/~seisen/Membranes.htm

pp. 42-43

 

W

8/30

Enzymes
http://www.cbu.edu/~seisen/Enzymes.htm

pp. 48-49

 

F

9/1

Cellular Respiration
http://users.rcn.com/jkimball.ma.ultranet/BiologyPages/G/Glycolysis.html
http://users.rcn.com/jkimball.ma.ultranet/BiologyPages/C/CellularRespiration.html
http://www.cbu.edu/~seisen/Glycolysis.htm
http://www.cbu.edu/~seisen/AerobicRespiration.htm

3.3

3

M

9/4

LABOR DAY – NO CLASSES

 

 

W

9/6

Histology (Microscopic anatomy)
http://www.cbu.edu/~seisen/IntroHistology/

4.1-4.2

 

F

9/8

Organ systems overview, Integumentary system, homeostasis

4.3-4.4

4

M

9/11

Digestive system
http://www.emc.maricopa.edu/faculty/farabee/BIOBK/BioBookDIGEST.html

7

 

W

9/13

Nutrition
http://www.cbu.edu/~seisen/Nutrition/

 7

 

F

9/15

***EXAM 1***

 

5

M

9/18

Composition and Function of the Blood
http://www.emc.maricopa.edu/faculty/farabee/BIOBK/BioBookcircSYS.html

5

 

W

9/20

Cardiovascular system
http://www.emc.maricopa.edu/faculty/farabee/BIOBK/BioBookcircSYS.html

Congenital defects
Information about patent foramen ovale
http://www.clevelandclinic.org/heartcenter/pub/guide/disease/congenital/pfo.htm

Information about patent ductus arteriosus
http://www.clevelandclinic.org/health/health-info/docs/3100/3176.asp?index=9859 

Some information about cardiac output
http://btc.montana.edu/olympics/physiology/pb01.html

6

 

F

9/22

Lymphatic system and immunity
http://www.emc.maricopa.edu/faculty/farabee/BIOBK/BioBookIMMUN.html

5.7, 22

6

M

9/25

Respiratory System
http://www.emc.maricopa.edu/faculty/farabee/BIOBK/BioBookRESPSYS.html

8

 

W

9/27

Effects of tobacco on the respiratory system

8.4-8.5

 

F

9/29

Urinary System and Excretion
http://www.emc.maricopa.edu/faculty/farabee/BIOBK/BioBookEXCRET.html

Components of a Urinalysis
http://www.cbu.edu/~seisen/UrinalysisComponents.htm

9

7

M

10/2

Yom Kippur – No lecture

 

 

W

10/4

Musculoskeletal System
http://www.emc.maricopa.edu/faculty/farabee/BIOBK/BioBookMUSSKEL.html

Tutorial on the skeletal system:
http://depts.washington.edu/bonebio/ASBMRed/ASBMRed.html

10, 11

 

F

10/6

Neuron Structure and Function
http://www.emc.maricopa.edu/faculty/farabee/BIOBK/BioBookNERV.html

Neurobiology animations
http://itc.gsw.edu/faculty/gfisk/anim/index.html

12.1

8

M

10/9

Neurotransmitters and Impulse conduction
http://www.emc.maricopa.edu/faculty/farabee/BIOBK/BioBookNERV.html

12.2

 

W

10/11

Peripheral Nervous System
http://www.emc.maricopa.edu/faculty/farabee/BIOBK/BioBookNERV.html

12.3-12.4

 

F

10/13

***EXAM II***

 

WEEK OF OCTOBER 16: FALL BREAK!!

9

M

10/23

Central Nervous System
http://www.emc.maricopa.edu/faculty/farabee/BIOBK/BioBookNERV.html

 

 

W

10/25

Drug Abuse

12.5-12.6

 

F

10/27

Senses

13

10

M

10/30

Endocrine System
http://www.emc.maricopa.edu/faculty/farabee/BIOBK/BioBookENDOCR.html

14

 

W

11/1

Male Reproductive System
http://www.emc.maricopa.edu/faculty/farabee/BIOBK/BioBookREPROD.html

Female Reproductive System, Birth control methods
http://www.emc.maricopa.edu/faculty/farabee/BIOBK/BioBookREPROD.html

15.1


15.2-15.5

 

F

11/3

Sexually transmitted diseases & AIDS supplement
http://www.cdc.gov/nchstp/dstd/disease_info.htm
OR
http://edcenter.med.cornell.edu/Pathophysiology_Cases/STDs/STD_TOC.html

Peri-anal or peri-vulval warts, or Condylomata acuminata
http://www.edu.rcsed.ac.uk/photoalbum/ph19.htm

23

11

M

11/6

Development

16

 

W

11/8

Mitosis
http://www.biology.arizona.edu/cell_bio/tutorials/cell_cycle/cells3.html

http://www.cbu.edu/~seisen/Mitosis.htm

17.1-17.2

 

F

11/10

***Exam 3***

 

12

M

11/13

Meiosis

17.3

 

W

11/15

DNA Structure and Replication

19.1

 

F

11/17

DNA Transcription and Translation

19.2

13

M

11/20

Biotechnology

19.4

 

W

11/21

Cancer
http://www.cbu.edu/~seisen/BreastStructureAndMammograms.htm

http://www.cbu.edu/~seisen/CancerGenetics.htm

From NetWatch, a feature of the weekly journal Science (5 August 2005 issue):

Cells gone Wild:
Hungry tumor cells send out for dinner, releasing molecules that spur blood vessels that grow toward them.  Learn more about the insidious ability - known as angiogenesis - and other aspects of cancer biology at this tutorial from lecturer Gregg Orloff of Emory University in Atlanta, Georgia, and contributors.  The site is aimed mainly at cancer patients and health care workers but includes plenty of information for students.  With an abundance of animations and diagrams, CancerQuest's 13 chapters plumb subjects such as the control of cell division and how defective genes bollix the delicate process.  Visitors can also read up on clinical trials and experimental therapies, such as poisons that target only brain cancer cells carrying a particular surface receptor.  Orloff is overhauling the site and will soon add new graphics and a timeline of cancer discoveries.

www.cancerquest.org

23

 

F

11/23

NO CLASS - THANKSGIVING

 

14

M

11/27

Evolution
http://www.cbu.edu/~seisen/Darwin.htm

25

 

W

11/29

Evolution of Humans:  Part I

 

 

F

12/1

***EXAM 4***

 

15

M

12/4

Evolution of Humans:  Part II

 

 

W

12/6

Community ecology

26 & 27

 

F

12/8

Global ecology
***Term paper due***

 

THE FINAL EXAM WILL BE GIVEN DURING FINAL EXAM WEEK

Term and Lab Report Format

  1. Please DOUBLE-SPACE your report, and use margin size to 1 inch.
  2. Place a cover sheet at the front of your. The cover sheet should have your name, the report title, the course and section numbers centered on the page. PLEASE DO NOT PLACE YOUR LABORATORY REPORT IN A PLASTIC OR OTHER BINDER.

CRITERIA FOR THE GRADING OF PAPERS AND EXPERIMENTAL REPORTS

            The maximum grade is a 4.0 and is a composite of three grades based on spelling grammar, and content.

I. Spelling counts 25% of the total grade. Each different spelling or typographical error will usually result in a point deducted from the maximum. However, if one word is consistently misspelled, it will be deducted only once. Low grades in spelling can be avoided by keeping a dictionary on hand and proofreading your work before you submit it for review.

II. Grammar counts 25% of the total grade. Each grammar error (wrong tense, poor sentence of paragraph structure) will usually result in a point deducted from the maximum. Low grades in grammar can be avoided by proofreading your work before you submit it and by writing practice essays.

III. Content counts 25% of the total grade. The kinds of questions that are considered in evaluating content include the following:

      1. Is your information accurate?
      2. Is your discussion logical?
      3. Did you transform the raw data into a more useful and appropriate format?
      4. Do you adequately support your argument?
      5. Do you adequately correlate and contrast your data to previous experience?
      6. Do you support your conclusions with the appropriate statistical test(s)?

IV. Format counts 25% of the total grade. The kinds of questions that are considered in evaluating format include the following:

  1. Did you follow the appropriate protocol for writing the report?
  2. Are all section of the lab report complete?
  3. Did you transform the data into an appropriate manner?
  4. Did you include the appropriate tables and figures?

You should write your reports as if you were submitting them to the Transactions of the Tennessee Academy of Sciences. I, in turn, will review them as if I were an editor for the journal.

Grades

Spelling x 25% = .

 

Grammar x 25% = .

 

Content x 25% =

 

Format x 25% = .

 

COMPOSITE GRADE .

 

Some General Guidelines on Laboratory Reports

  1. Use first-person past tense in the abstract, materials & methods & results sections, since you are describing what you did.
    In other words, "we dissected the liver from Lepomis macrochirus" is clearer than "Livers were dissected from Lepomis macrochirus".
  2. Species names should be italicized or underlined.
    For example, "We studied the excystation behavior of Posthodiplostomum minimum" or "We studied the excystation behavior of Posthodiplostomum minimum.
  3. When a species has a long name, it is acceptable to contract the genus name to one letter if you refer to it as such at the beginning of your paper.
    For example, "We studied the excystation behavior of Posthodiplostumum minimum (referred in this paper as P. minimum)."
  4. The References Cited section should include those articles or books from which you collected information and quote it in your report. The citation in your paper should appear as (AuthorLastName, YearOfPublication).
    For example, "P. minimum metacercariae become resistant to pepsin between days 26 and 44 (Eisen, 1999).
  5. Each Figure should be numbered and referred to in the text of your results section in parentheses.
    For example, "We observed maximal movement in the well where the larvae were first exposed to acid saline with pepsin, followed by alkaline Tyrode's solution with trypsin (Figure 1).