Excellence in Teaching ~ 2002
A Professional Development Workshop
Christian Brothers University
 Program and
Abstracts

[Page updated 15 Aug. 2002]

Portrait of St. John Baptist De LaSalle by Dr. Rena Durr of CBU
Thursday,
15 August 2002
Christian Brothers University
650 East Parkway South
Memphis, TN 38104

E-mail:
enelson@cbu.edu
snicks@cbu.edu
Phone: 901-321-3362

Excellence in Teaching ~ 2002

 

Links
to
Titles
and
Abstracts
for each
Paper
and
Poster

Program:
CBU home page
  • Paper sessions and

  • Posters are in Buckman Hall.
  • Date:

  • Thursday,
    15 August 2002.
     
  • All participants: If you'd like to contribute additional links or other information to this page, please send the information to aross@cbu.edu
CBU Excellence in Teaching
Thursday, 15 August 2002
Registration
and Coffee
8:15-8:45  Montesi Foyer, Buckman Hall
Refreshments:  BU 209
Welcome
8:45-9:00  Spain Aud.
Posters
8:45-11:45 a.m. BU 209
Poster 1. Poster of the New Plough Library Website and the Resources for Faculty Section
Benjamin Head, Plough Library
Poster 2. So Much Research…So Little Time
Sandra Nicks, Dept. of Behavioral Sciences
Poster 3. Development of a Peer Evaluation Scale
Kristin Prien, Dept. of Management
Poster 4. GE is the BASE  The GER Committee: Arthur Yanushka, School of Sciences, Poster Chair.
Poster 5. We... can do anything... with Barbie
Elizabeth Nelson, Dept. of Behavioral Sciences
Poster 6.
The Relationship Between Faculty Use and Attitudes Toward Information Technology in Teaching and Advising and Need for Cognition
Elizabeth Nelson, Dept. of Behavioral Sciences
Session A
 9:00-9:45 Concurrent Papers
9:00-9:25
BU 102
Undergraduate International Research: The Good the Bad and the Ugly
Malinda Fitzgerald, Dept. of Biology and Janet McCord, Dept. of Religion and Philosophy
9:00-9:45
BU 111
Two cases in capital budgeting for finance students
Jeffrey Schultz, Dept. of Finance
9:25-9:45
BU 102
The IRB Process at CBU
Elizabeth Nelson and Rod Vogl, Dept. of Behavioral Sciences
9:00-9:45
BU 112
Plagiarism: The Problem, Detecting it and Some Solutions.  Information Literacy at Christian Brothers University
Benjamin Head, Plough Library
9:00-9:45
BU 223
How to get students to want to come to class: Twenty ideas in twenty minutes
Tracie Burke, Dept. of Behavioral Sciences
Session B
10:00-10:45  Concurrent Papers
10:00-10:45
BU 102
Accreditation Criteria for Electrical Engineering Program—Implementing EC-2000 Criteria
John Ventura, Dept. of Electrical Engineering
10:00-10:45
BU 104
Teaching a Course to Non-majors
Johnny Holmes, School of Sciences
10:00-10:45
BU 111
Where Disciplines Intersect: Anthropology, English and the Human Condition
Mary Cargill, Dept. of Literature and Language, and Teri Mason, Dept. of Behavioral Sciences
10:00-10:45
BU 112
“It Was the Best of Times, It Was the Worst of Times; Or What the Dickens Does Writing Have to Do With What I Teach?”
Clayann Panetta, Dept. of Literature and Language
Session C
11:00-11:45 Concurrent Papers
11:00-11:45
BU 102
Incorporation of Inquiry Models into the Traditional Science Laboratory
Dennis Merat, Dept. of Chemistry
11:00-11:45
BU 111
What makes a super teacher? 
Bro. Ignatius Brown and Cathy Meredith Parker, Dept. of Education
11:00-11:45
BU 218
WebCT at CBU
Mike Condren, Dept. of Chemistry
11:00-11:45
BU 112
Drug Use Habits Reported by Incoming Students Enrolled in ORIN 100
Stan Eisen, Dept. of Biology
Lunch
12:30  Lunch at The Seventh Inning, 3040 Walnut Grove Road
Conference
Evaluation
All Participants:  Please fill out the Conference Evaluation Form
Updates:
  • Authors: Do you have additional resources, a late abstract, or corrections to submit?  Please send to aross@cbu.edu
  • Additions:
  • All participants:  If you'd like to contribute additional links or other information  to this page, please send the information to aross@cbu.edu
  • Biol 212L: Comparative Anatomy Lab Spring 2000.Biol 218L: Human Anatomy and Physiology Lab Spring 2000.CBU Student Research Poster Session 2001.

    Time & Room
    Excellence in Teaching ~ 2002
    Abstracts for Papers and Posters  (Alphabetical by first author)
    What makes a super teacher? 
    Bro. Ignatius Brown and Cathy Meredith Parker, Department of Education
    The presenters will share information gathered from graduate students over a four year period about the qualifications that they believe makes a good teacher.  This list will be compared to the qualifications of a competent teacher noted from best practices in educational research.
    How to get students to want to come to class: Twenty ideas in twenty minutes
    Tracie Burke, Department of Behavioral Sciences
    During this fast-paced and interactive presentation, I will share with you twenty quick and fun techniques I use to enliven my classes and entice students to attend. While most are based on sound pedagogical scholarship, others are just plain goofy. If you miss this, it probably won’t matter, but the rest us will talk about you.
    Where Disciplines Intersect: Anthropology, English and the Human Condition
    Mary Cargill, Department of Literature and Language and Teri Mason, Department of Behavioral Sciences
    This presentation will look at utilizing a work from a very different field to illuminate a course – in this case, using literature in a class organized around such subjects as energy use and modes of survival, economies of scale, political controls, and behavioral variation.  Mary Cargill’s book Voices of the Vietnamese Boat People provides a concrete, non-textbook glimpse into the reality of lives outside of those filled with dishwashers, cars in the garage, and the luxury of excess food.  Subsequently, I have found that nonfiction narrative has been a great tool in bringing to life anthropological topics which may seem very remote to students.  Use of the book fosters empathy, understanding and respect for those on the other side of the economic world.  By vicarious experience, Voices provides a glimpse of surviving political prison, re-education camps, removal from your home, multiple escape attempts, and possibly even having to place your dead children over the side of a boat in the midst of the South China Sea.  And these vignettes are made even more poignant in that some of these things happened to people who may have passed the students in the hallway at CBU, which is much more relevant, I feel, than just another anthropology ethnography about distant people and places.
         In addition to offering a view of alien lives, and hopefully – what is important in life, the book demonstrates to students (and to us as faculty) the intersection of disciplines, giving evidence that we are not operating in a vacuum here.  It also makes real the concept that a college education offers a variety of paths to comprehending the same thing – the human condition.  In our own ways, we’re trying to follow E. M. Forster’s edict to “only connect.” 
    WebCT at CBU
    Mike Condren, Department of Chemistry
    Web Course Tools (WebCT) has been use at CBU for about three years.  It is a very powerful course management tool that is very popular with students because it allows them to privately track their progress in a course at any time.  The School of Engineering was the first CBU School to use this tool, but it now is being used in all four schools, in multiple courses and majors.  Come learn more about this software package, see if it can improve your courses, and then get started using it through the Friday afternoon sessions of the WebCT Resource Center.
    Drug Use Habits Reported by Incoming Students Enrolled in ORIN 100
    Stan Eisen, Department of Biology
    For the past two years, incoming students in ORIN 100 have filled out survey forms pertaining to lifetime drug use habits.  Data indicate the following:
    1) Most students ingest caffeine daily;
    2) Approximately 2/3 of incoming freshmen have used alcohol, and 1% use it daily;
    3) Approximately 1/4 of the students have used marijuana, and less than 1% use it daily;
    4) Less than 3% have used cocaine, amphetamines, heroin, or PCP.
    These results are consistent with surveys conducted among high school seniors.
    Undergraduate International Research: The Good the Bad and the Ugly
    Malinda E. C Fitzgerald, Department of Biology and Janet McCord, Department of Religion and Philosophy
    Does eight to ten weeks in a foreign country sound wonderful? It certainly can be. It is one of those life-changing experiences for students and faculty alike. Even better, a grant pays all expenses. We are in the second year of a three-year grant and the learning curve is steep. This presentation will enlighten the CBU community about our program, the projects we have had students involved in, and what the biggest hurdles have been. In addition, we will discuss how you, too, can spend the summer in Brazil or Africa or .. . a destination of your choice!”  MIRT
    • Poster 

    • 8:45-11:45 a.m.
      BU 209
    Poster of the New Plough Library Website and the Resources for Faculty Section
    Benjamin Head, Plough Library
    The library has been working since spring on the new website and partially launched it at the beginning of the summer. We have continued to develop it and will provide a poster and an interactive display at the teaching conference.
    Plagiarism: The Problem, Detecting it and Some Solutions
    Benjamin Head, Plough Library
    This will be an introduction to the plagiarism section of our new website and will offer information and sources on the following:
  • What exactly is plagiarism? Will explore all the aspects and definitions of what constitutes plagiarism, including the legal, the student’s and professor’s view.
  • Detecting Plagiarism. Will explore methods of detecting plagiarism with a list of review procedure, internet services (free and subscription) and available software.
  • Solutions to Plagiarism. There are several steps that can be taken to prevent and discourage plagiarism. These include exploring why students plagiarize, improved assignment structure, improved information literacy, knowing what plagiarism is and others.
  • Report or not, the dilemma. Will explore the dilemma of detecting and reporting of  plagiarism and the consequences for the student, professor and the school.

  • Information Literacy at Christian Brothers University
    Benjamin Head, Plough Library
    Exactly what is Information Literacy in this day and age and its relevance to the education of the whole person?  We will define information literacy in terms of what skills and knowledge should be possessed by college level students to be information literate; will explore current and future multifaceted, progressive, and collaborative methods of assuring the information literacy of CBU students.
    Teaching a Course to Non-majors
    Johnny Holmes, Dean of School of Sciences
    [Slide show (33 slides)  MSWord document]
    How do you reach students who do not think that they are interested in your subject?  [In my 26 years of teaching, I have seldom had the opportunity to teach a physics course to a class filled with physics majors.  I have taught physics to engineering majors (who should have some interest), physics to biology majors (who have little interest), and natural science to arts and business majors (who usually dread the prospect).  Through all of this, I have managed to obtain very high student evaluations.]  The first rule is to show enthusiasm and love for the subject.  The second is to give the students an overview of the subject and a framework for the material.  The third is to realize that everyone already knows a lot about your subject though they may not realize or acknowledge that they do, and then to connect with what the students already know.  The fourth is to provide practice opportunities (best if they are graded) for students to master the required skills.  The fifth is to work actively with the students to remove all excuses for failure.  Examples of each of these will be provided.
    Incorporation of Inquiry Models into the Traditional Science Laboratory
    Dennis Merat, Department of Chemistry
    New experiments have been prepared for the Introduction to Physical Science laboratory course that combine inquiry models with more traditional methods of teaching laboratory science.  After the students have performed a series of tasks designed to provide them with   the requisite skills and conceptual knowledge, they are presented with a novel problem and asked to both design and execute their own protocols to solve the problem.  An overview of selected experiments will be presented.
    • Poster 

    • 8:45-11:45 a.m.
      BU 209
    We…can do anything…with Barbie
    Dr. Elizabeth Nelson, Department of Behavioral Sciences
    PowerPoint image of the poster.
    The film Media Impact describes how film and television affect thoughts and attitudes.  Mass communication is not limited to these forms of media.  Toys can influence perceptions of self and others.  The video Barbie Nation tells viewers that Barbie has impacted both childrens' and adults' views on body image, sexual relationships, gender roles, and family life.  Students in the course, Reality, Fantasy, and the Media, saw both videos mentioned above and then created dioramas using Barbie and Ken to depict a media image of women or couples. They discussed their dioramas in a journal entry. The professor displayed the dioramas for the university community.  The Barbie diorama can be created by both male and female students in a variety of courses to depict the individual’s understanding of topics such as stereotypes, discrimination, fantasy, violence, propaganda, psychopathology, drug abuse, and dreams.
    • Poster 
      8:45-11:45 a.m.
      BU 209
    The Relationship Between Faculty Use and Attitudes Toward Information Technology in Teaching and Advising and Need for Cognition
    Dr. Elizabeth Nelson, Department of Behavioral Sciences
    Universities encourage their faculty to apply information technology (IT) in teaching and advising (Brink, 2001; Murray, 2002; Ritzer & Sleigh, 2001). It was hypothesized that faculty’s attitudes toward and use of IT in education would be related to individual need for cognition. As part of the university strategic planning process, an ad-hoc on-line committee of faculty members, including the researcher, at Christian Brothers University developed a questionnaire to gather current information about the IT that CBU faculty use in teaching and advising and about faculty perceptions of the appropriate use of IT in teaching and advising. The researcher correlated responses from 58 faculty members with the 34-item Need for Cognition Scale (Cacioppo & Petty, 1982). Need for cognition was positively correlated with desire to hold electronic office hours, knowing the details of using IT in courses, knowing ways to supplement courses with IT, and willingness to financially support a school colleague as an IT resource person. The Need for Cognition Scale may be used as a strategic planning tool by universities wishing to implement change in instructional delivery. 
    The IRB Process at CBU
    Elizabeth Nelson and Rod Vogl, Department of Behavioral Sciences
    The faculty handbook contains a section on HUMAN RESEARCH POLICY.  This section states that “each student or faculty member planning research involving human subjects or animals will submit a statement to the appropriate committee which briefly indicates the nature and purpose of the proposed research and the methodology to be employed.  The Committee on Human Research is under the supervision of the School of Arts. Each committee will establish and maintain policies to assure that proposed research complies with appropriate ethical, professional, and legal guidelines in its area, and will review all research proposals submitted to it according to these guidelines.  Approval by the appropriate committee is required before the research may be conducted.”  The proposed presentation will inform the faculty of the policies, procedures and guidelines of the Committee on Human Research.
    • Poster 

    • 8:45-11:45 a.m.
      BU 209
    So Much Research…So Little Time
    Sandra Nicks, Department of Behavioral Sciences
    This poster will describe the “Psi Chi Research Group” that was established to allow students who have limited time to devote to a project the ability to gain research experience. The group meets once a week for 30 minutes and the members are given weekly assignments leading to a pre-established research goal. With weekly meetings and multiple members, the work is completed efficiently and effectively without a large time commitment. Since 1999, when the group was first established, the research group has completed three projects and is now in the process of conducting an experiment.  In addition, the research group has obtained three Psi Chi National Research Grants, presented at three regional and national conferences and have won a regional Psi Chi award for one of the presentations. The poster presentation will address the procedures used to set up the group, ways to organize the group’s work, and give student opinions about the skills they have obtained by being involved in the group.
    “It Was the Best of Times, It Was the Worst of Times; Or What the Dickens Does Writing Have to Do With What I Teach?”
    Clayann Panetta, Department of Literature and Language
    When instructors across disciplines think of writing, they often think about it in one of three different ways: (1) they wish the English department would take care of it; (2) they wish their students would be better at it; (3) they dare not say too much about #2 because the English department may pull some of that Writing Across the Curriculum (WAC) stuff, requiring instructors in disciplines outside the English department to put time into what wasn’t their job in the first place.  Because students often have problems transferring what they learned in English Composition to their own disciplines, this presentation will acknowledge the truth behind the first two viewpoints.  This truth, though, is problematic if students graduate with poor communication skills in their discipline.  Since, as the third viewpoint above indicates, may instructors may be squeamish about incorporating aspects of writing into their discipline, this presentation will also set the skeptical at ease by dismantling the myths about WAC.  Specifically, you will learn about a different (albeit not “new”) way of viewing WAC called Write to Learn.  This application of WAC is flexible, and the depth of application is instructor driven—based on your own pedagogical and work philosophies.  Come see how Write to Learn can work for your pedagogy and your students’ way of learning!
    • Poster 

    • 8:45-11:45 a.m.
      BU 209
    Development of a Peer Evaluation Scale
    Kristin Prien, Department of Management
    Few students finish an undergraduate degree without exposure to a group project. A major problem in such groups is how to recognize and suitable reward both the free-riders and those who contribute more than their share of effort.
    This presentation illustrates the steps involved in creating a peer evaluation instrument. The project was assigned to an advanced undergraduate human resource management class. Class members developed performance dimensions and items, categorized and rated items, and selected the final items for inclusion in the scale. Data from actual classes that have used the scale will also be presented to illustrate the scale’s measurement properties.
    TWO CASES IN CAPITAL BUDGETING FOR FINANCE STUDENTS:
    [One a "fun" case; the other a "real-world" investment]
    Jeffrey Schultz, Department of Finance
    The primary subject matter of this set of cases is applying the basics of capital budgeting to see if a robot should replace a human because of cost savings and should a "long position" be taken in a secured corporate bond. The first case is obviously a spoofsniffer while the second was taken from an actual research report I wrote for institutional money managers in 1994.  The cases make an interesting use of the "simplistic" basic capital budgeting model. The cases are unique since they allow the student to "plug in" numbers for future price of  a building and the initial outlay in the cost of a bond to determine if an investment should be made in the purchase of the bond. These cases can be used for finance seniors or "rookie," first-year M. B. A. students.  Another unique feature is the cases are dynamic over time; therefore, one can make new decisions based on the current information.  The major risk to the author is he may invest his own monies in the rough "model," as a "real-world" guinea pig.
    Accreditation Criteria for Electrical Engineering Program—Implementing EC-2000 Criteria
    John Ventura, Department of Electrical Engineering
    The project concentrates on two topics: (1) formulating the required learning outcomes and (2) generating a program that enables faculty to achieve the required learning outcomes. This project focuses on the application of the Accreditation Board of Engineering and Technology criteria, EC-2000, requiring engineering programs to formulate curriculum based on program outcomes. This presentation will propose a plan for the electrical engineering program at Christian Brothers University.
    • Poster 

    • 8:45-11:45 a.m.
      BU 209
    GE is the BASE
    Ad Hoc GER Committee: Arthur Yanushka, School of Sciences and Poster Chair; Brother Louis Althaus, Vice President for Academic Affairs; Ron Eaton, School of Business; Jack Hargett: Institutional Effectiveness and Records; Brother Allen Johnson, School of Arts; Cayce Lawrence, Faculty Assembly President; Kris Pruitt, School of Arts; Fred Terry, School of Engineering.  Poster design and layout by Cory Dugan.
    1982 - 2002
    The only changes since the first mention of General Education Requirements in 1969 through 2002 are the reduction of the number of hours required for graduation from 138 to 122 and the number of hours in General Education from 50-37.
    Over the past two decades,
    · Our campus has changed,
    · Our faculty have changed,
    · Our students have changed,
    · Our world has changed,
    But our GERs remain substantially the same.
    .... Isn't now the time to consider a change in the GERs?
    |To the Program List|
    Updates:
  • Do you have a late abstract or correction to submit?  Please send it to aross@cbu.edu
  • Additions:
  • If you'd like to contribute additional links or other information related to any of these papers or posters, please send the information to aross@cbu.edu
  • Teaching & Learning Web Resources
      [Links checked 25 Feb. 2002]
     
  • CBU Faculty Handbook  (Access from CBU domain)
  • CBU Excellence in Teaching 2000
  •   Journals & Associations
  • American Association for Higher Education
  • The Scholarship of Teaching and Learning
  • Online Journal on Excellence in College Teaching
  •  
     
  • The Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching
  •  
  • Teaching and Learning:  Brigham Young University Faculty Center
  •  
     
  • Problem-based Learning (U Delaware)
  •  
  • Case Studies in Science (SUNY  Buffalo)
  •   Teaching with the aide of Technology
  • Teaching and learning on the web (Maricopa Community Colleges, AZ)
  • MERLOT (a collection of interactive online learning materials).
  • Role of Technology in Higher Education (National Education Association)
  • UMUC-Bell Atlantic Virtual Resource Site for Teaching with Technology
  • Teaching at an Internet Distance: the Pedagogy of Online Teaching and Learning, Univ. of Illinois
  •  
     
  • Academic Assessment U. Missouri, Rolla Educational and pedagogical resources related to improving teaching, learning and advising
  •  
  • Preventing F's:  A Guide for Tough Basic-Sciences Teachers.  Ed Friedlander, M.D.
  •  
  • Successful Students:  Guidelines and Thoughts for Academic Success.  Professor Steve Thien, Kansas State University
  •  
      Links for information on Service-Learning:
                                 (From Pete Gathje and Teri Mason)  [Links checked 25 Feb. 2002]
  • AAHE Service-Learning Project:  the site provides introductory information about service learning, syllabi, and links to other service learning sites.
  • Service-Learning on the Web at Colorado:  the site provides introductory information about service learning, syllabi, and links to other service learning sites.
  • National Society for Experiential Education
  • National Service-Learning Clearinghouse:  the site provides introductory information about service learning, syllabi, and links to other service learning sites.
  • Service Learning Center at Bentley College: best for business related service learning, though it also has some general comments about service learning.
  • Campus Compact: "a coalition of college and university presidents committed to helping students develop the values and skills of citizenship through participation in public and community service."  The site gives an overview of service learning and provides a number of publications available for purchase.
  • Dr. Thompson-Jaeger and students in Microbiology Lab March 2002.Graduation May 2001.
    Strengthening our Commitment to Teaching Excellence
    CALL FOR PAPERS

    Submission Deadline

    • Submitted by 22 March 2002.
    Submission Requirements:
    • 50-100 word abstract describing the nature of your presentation
    • Include title, all authors
    • Include preferred format (e.g. poster, presentation)
    • Include preferred length (15, 30, 45, or 55 minutes)
    • Include first author box number, e-mail, and phone number
    Send submissions to:
    Dr. Sandra Nicks
    Behavioral Sciences
    CBU Box 108
    snicks@cbu.edu
    Poster Board Format:
    Poster boards are double-sided.  There will be a poster on each side.  Each poster presentation will have one board, 72" wide, made up of four panels each 30" high by 18" wide.  Clear push pins will be available.  The boards will be displayed on tables.  The table space may be used for handouts or supplemental displays.
    (Schedule:  Posters will be set up by 8:45 am in BU209 and will remain up until 11:45 am.)
    CBU Excellence in Teaching 2002
    Christian Brothers University
    http://www.cbu.edu/~aross/teach02/Conf-Aug2002.html
      CBU Dept. of Biology
    CBU School of Sciences
    CBU Biology Webmaster:
     E-mail: aross@cbu.edu
    Anna E. Ross, Ph.D.
     Associate Professor of Biology

    [This page updated 15 August 2002 ~ AER]