Tennessee Academy of Science Collegiate Division 
Western Regional Meeting 2000
Christian Brothers University
 Program and Abstracts
E-mail:
malinda@cbu.edu
Phone: 901-321-3445
FAX: 901-321-4433
Meeting:  25 March 2000
Christian Brothers University
650 East Parkway South
Memphis, TN 38104
 
TAS Collegiate Div. Western Regional at CBU
Meeting Program: 
 
Award Ribbon

Follow 
these 
Links
to see
Abstracts
for each Session

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Go to the index to locate a particular presentor

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Meeting location
CBU in Memphis
  • CBU Research Poster Session 18 April 2000. 11:00-2:00 in the Thomas Center East Lounge, CBU
  •  


    Above: Nicole Walker, Amanda Frazier, Jarad Braddy, Amy Fallon, and Tim O'Leary.

    Above: Nesreen Ismail, Karen Hill, Neetu Pael, Tejal Patel, and Dr. Mary Ogilvie.

    Program:  TAS@CBU 2000
    Saturday, 25 March 2000
    Registration
    8:00-8:40 am
    Science Building
    Lobby, CBU
    • Registration (coffee and muffins):  8:00-8:40 am, Saturday morning, 25 March 2000

    • Lobby of the Science Building CBU
      There is a $10 registration fee.  Lunch is provided to all registrants.

    Dr. Bill Thierfelder, Ms. Sharon Frase, and Dr. Linda Brinkley
    Opening
    Remarks
    8:45 am
    S153
    ~~~
    Keynote 
    Address
    S153
    • Opening Remarks:  8:45 am in S153
      • Bro. Stanislaus Sobczyk, F.S.C., President, Christian Brothers University
    • Introduction of the Keynote speaker: 
      • Dr. Malinda Fitzgerald, Associate Professor of Biology, CBU
    • Keynote Address: 
      • Dr. Linda Pifer, Professor of Clinical Medical Sciences, U.T. Memphis
        • Brave New World: The Biotech Explosion of the 21st Century.
    Dr. Pifer's Keynote Address

      |Return to Program Contents|
    ~~~
    Session One
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    Experimental Methods
    and
    Morphological Assessment
    Moderator: Brother Edward Salgado
    ~~~
    Session One
    10:15-12:00
    Room S155
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    Session One,
    continued
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    Session One:  Experimental Methods and Morphological Assessment
    Moderator: Brother Edward Salgado, F.S.C., Ph.D., Associate Professor and Chair CBU Biology
  • 10:15-12:00
  • Room S155
  • 10:15 Changes in Rat Cranial Suture Morphology. 

  • Dr. Carolyn Jaslow and Brock Lanier. Rhodes College, Department of Biology, 2000 N. Parkway; Memphis, TN 38112
      Cranial sutures are joints between the skull bones and their structure reflects patterns of growth and applied forces. To examine the effect of incisor eruption and occlusion on the developing suture, thirty-six rat pups were sacrificed on days one, five, seven, nine, thirteen, seventeen, and twenty-three of life. The skulls of these rats were cleared and stained. Facial sutures of the skulls were measured and the complexity, or interdigitation, of these sutures was quantitatively recorded as the ratio of the length of the suture divided by its end-to-end distance. These measurements can illustrate whether a linear development of interdigitation occurs or if the rate of interdigitation is related to incisor eruption, which begins between days eight and ten, and the start of occlusion, which begins a few days later.
  • 10:30 Development of Microwave-Assisted Decalcification Protocol: Comparison with Standard Techniques. 

  • Jarad Braddy1 and S. Frase2. Dept. of Biology1, Christian Bros. University; Integrated Microscopy Center2, University of Memphis, TN. 
      In this investigation, a protocol for the decalcification of the rodent skull, Mus musculus, with ethylene diamine tetraacetic acid (EDTA) using microwave technology was developed. This newly developed protocol is described in detail and allows for adequate decalcification to occur in hours, as opposed to the many days required with routine EDTA methods. The preservation of cellular structure in specimens decalcified using this new procedure was evaluated using a control specimen decalcified using routine EDTA procedures. Hematoxylin and Eosin stained slides of both specimens were compared. The specimen decalcified using microwave technology demonstrated preservation of cellular structure equal to or better than that of the routinely decalcified sample. Funding by University of Memphis, Integrated Microscopy Center.
  • 10:45 The analysis of vaporized hydrogen peroxide parameter using design of experiments. 

  • Karen Hill, Department of Biology, Christian Brothers University and Dave Vogel, Smith & Nephew Orthopaedics. 
      The purpose of this project was to determine which process parameters or interaction of parameters were most critical to sterilant concentration in a vaporized hydrogen peroxide sterilizer. The statistical tool, Design of Experiments (DOE), was used to study the interaction of the process parameters. The process parameters studied were: load temperature load size, chamber pressure, liquid sterilant weight, and transition gas. These process parameters were randomly changed to their high and low limits while measuring the H2O2 concentration. The study demonstrated that the most significant process parameter was load volume. Other factors that had an impact were sterilant weight and chamber pressure. 
  • 11:00 Classification and Correlation of Nonpyramidal Neurons Using Morphology and Physiology. 

  • J. Michelle Chang, Dept. of Biology, Christian Brothers University, M. Galarreta and S. Hestrin, Dept. of Anat. & Neurobiol., UT, Memphis
    The purpose of this study was to determine if a morphological and physiological correlation could be found between pyramidal and nonpyramidal neurons (NP), specifically in NP of the cerebral cortex of fourteen to twenty one day old rats. The classification of some nonpyramidal neurons was also attempted. By using immunocytochemistry, pyramidal neurons showed the characteristic of having a dominant apical dendrite that passed from the cell body vertically toward the pial surface of the neuron. Nonpyramidal neurons lacked this feature characteristic of the pyramidal cells. In addition, their somata exhibited different sizes and had a variety of dendritic field shapes and few to no dendritic spines. Pyramidal neuron recordings revealed spikes that exhibited accommodation, while NP showed no accommodation. Bitufted and bipolar neurons, one type of NP, exhibited regular spiking patterns and their axon passed through several layers of the neocortex. This distribution pattern may suggest that NP are important inhibitors of neurons in vertical columns of the neocortex. The multipolar neurons, another type of NP, exhibited fast spiking patterns and showed dense local innervations. These data lead to the conclusion that multipolar cells exhibit very powerful inhibition to local areas, whereas bitufted and bipolar cells inhibit neurons in cortical columns. This suggests that the morphology of neurons is an important feature of their function. 
    Grant R07-3004-54.
  •  Award Ribbon  11:15 MORPHOLOGICAL INVESTIGATION OF NEUROSPHERES. 

  • Nicole Walker1, Eric Laywell2, Dennis Steindler2, and Malinda Fitzgerald1, 2  1CBU, BIOLOGY DEPT., MEMPHIS; 2UNIV. OF TENNESSE, DEPT. OF ANATOMY AND NEUROSCIENCE, MEMPHIS
      The subependymal zone (SEZ) is a persistently neurogenic structure that lines the periventricular region of the forebrain throughout life. The SEZ contains multipotent neural stem/progenitor cells that are capable of generating neurons, astrocytes, and oligodendrocytes. In vitro, stem/progenitor cells of the SEZ can grow as proliferative, multipotent clones called neurospheres that are also capable of giving rise to the three classes of cells found in the central nervous system. In this investigation, four mouse pup SEZs were extracted, twenty-five clones were obtained, fixed, mounted on stubs, and coated for scanning electron microscopy observation. Some cells were immunolabeled with antibodies against the cell surface and extracellular matrix proteins L1 and tenascin. The neurospheres were found to be around 90 mm in diameter, and there were different shapes the neurospheres assumed. There were single-cell outgrowths around the periphery. These single cells were around 3 mm in diameter. As for the antibodies, there appeared to be more L1 labeling than tenascin. Future studies such as these should lead to insights into the composition and behavior of these potentially therapeutic sources of neural cells.
      Funded by NIH and NINDS through the University of Tennessee, Memphis.
  • 11:30 Isolation of Ureaplasma urealyticum from Lung Tissue of Neonates. 

  • Tejal Patel, Dept Biology, Christian Brothers University, Barbara Benstein, MS, Dept Clinical Laboratory Sciences, UT, and Dennis Crouse, MD, PhD, SIU School of Medicine, Division of Neonatology, Dept. Pediatrics, Springfield, IL (formerly Dept Pediatrics, Univ TN)
    [Abstract not available.]
  •  Award Ribbon  11:45 The Role of Polyamines in Migration of Cultured Retinal Pigment Epithelial Cells 

  • Amy Fallon*, D.A. Johnson#, and M.E.C. Fitzgerald*
    Christian Brothers Univ., Dept. of Biol.* and UT, Memphis, Dept. Ophthalmolgy#.
      Studies from this laboratory have shown that polyamines are necessary for the cellular migration of cultured retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells. In this study, we investigated the necessity of polyamines for migration through inhibition of ornithine decarboxylase (ODC) and S-adenosylmethionine decarboxylase (SAMDC), two of the rate limiting enzymes of polyamine biosynthesis. Cells were grown to confluency at which point they were treated with difluoromethylornithine (DFMO), diethylglyoxal bisguanylhydrazone (DEGBG), or a combination of the two. Exogenous spermine was added to selected cultures. Treatments were conducted for two days at the end of which a migration stimulus was introduced. Cell migration was determined after the allowance of a six-hour migration period. Migration of RPE cells treated with DFMO was reduced to ~40% of control levels, and the results were reversed to ~96% with spermine addition. In cells treated with DEGBG, migration was reduced to ~35% of control levels, but the ability to migrate was restored to ~70% with the addition of spermine. Treatment of cells with both DFMO and DEGBG inhibited migration ~50%. Migration was restored with concominant treatment with exogenous spermine. These data reveal the necessity of polyamines in cultured RPE cellular migration. The polyamine-depletion is believed to affect migration through rearrangement of the cytoskeleton. Further studies are needed however to investigate the role of polyamines in greater detail.
      Supported by: Fight for Sight (A. Fallon) & NEI Grant #RO1EY01655 (D.A. Johnson)
    Session One ends at 12:00
    Lunch served at 12:15 
    in the Thomas Center Conference Room
      |Return to Program Contents|
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    Session Two
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    Organismal 
    Biology 
    and 
    Behavior
    Moderator: 
    Dr. Anna Ross
    ~~~
    Session Two 10:15-12:15 
    Room S153
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    Session Two:  Organismal Biology and Behavior
    Moderator: Dr. Anna E. Ross, Associate Professor of Biology, CBU
  • 10:15-12:15 
  • Room S153
  • 10:15 THE RESPONSE OF MALE MEADOW VOLES TO THE SCENT MARKS OF FEMALE CONSPECIFICS IN DIFFERENT REPRODUCTIVE STATES

  • Danielle N. Lee and Michael H. Ferkin, University of Memphis, Department of Biology, Memphis, TN 38152
      Meadow voles, Microtus pennsylvanicus, like other mammals, use scent marks to convey information about their reproductive state to conspecifics. We predicted the rate of scent marking by female and male meadow voles is depended on their reproductive state. We also predicted that the rate of scent marking by and the reproductive state of the donor affects the scent marking behavior of an opposite-sex individual that encounters these marks. We conducted two experiments to address the predictions. In experiment 1, we hypothesized that a postpartum estrus (PPE) female deposits more scent marks than a behavioral estrus (BE) or ovariectomized (OVX) female. In experiment 2, we hypothesized that a deposits more over-marks on the marks of a PPE female than those of a BE or OVX female. The data from experiments 1 and 2 supported each hypothesis. PPE females appear to signal heightened attractivity to males and males are more responsive to scent marks of PPE females as compared to those of other females. Scent marking by females and subsequent male over-marking may serve to coordinate mating in meadow voles. 
  • 10:30  AGGRESSIVE INTERACTIONS AND BEHAVIORS OF THREE, MALE WESTERN LOWLAND GORILLAS (GORILLA GORILLA GORILLA).

  • Mandy McGill Tillery, J. A. Huggins and H. W. Wofford. Department of Biology, Union University, Jackson TN.
      In this study, the aggressive interactions among three, male western lowland gorillas (Gorilla gorilla gorilla), Tumai, Koga, and Oliver from the Memphis Zoo, were examined. Because Koga had been showing signs of aggressive behavior with Tumai, the oldest gorilla, he (Koga) was the primary subject of the observations. However, any significant aggressive interactions among the other gorillas were documented. The gorillas were observed in their outdoor exhibit in thirty second intervals for thirty minute intervals over several days. It was found that Koga rarely made any advances toward either Tumai or Oliver. However, Tumai and Oliver both made aggressive advances toward Koga. Although the harassing behaviors of Oliver toward Koga appeared to be a playful/learning behavior, Tumai’s encounters appeared to be in response to aggression. 
      This study was made possible by the assistance of Dr. Chuck Brady and the Memphis Zoo.
  •  10:45 Patterns of Self-Administration in Rats Acquiring Nicotine Addiction. 

  • Mary Carole Taylor, Biology Dept., Christian Brothers University, Victoria Brower Ph.D. and Shannon Matta Ph.D., Dept. Pharmacology, Univ. Tennessee College of Medicine, Memphis, TN. 
      Previous animal models for nicotine addiction do not mimic the human pattern of nicotine exposure through smoking. This could have significant consequence for studies characterizing neuronal changes with chronic use. The purpose of this study was to develop a rat behavioral model that more closely emulated human smoking; i.e., exposure was chronic, intermittent and motivated. Male rats were allowed to self-administer nicotine with 24 h unlimited access over a 25 day period. Nicotine was self-injected when each rat pressed a bar connected by computer to a pump that injected nicotine into the rat as a rapidly delivered bolus through an indwelling iv catheter. Daily patterns of self-administration were recorded as the number and time of injections. Results demonstrated that, during acquisition, individual patterns varied greatly from day to day, as well as between animals. As maintenance levels and addiction were achieved, these variations decreased. In addition, self-administration during the inactive (sleep) cycle increased. This model more closely resembles the actual patterns of nicotine exposure in smoking humans. (funded by NIDA DA03977)
  •  Award Ribbon  11:00 Consequences of multi-male mating in female voles. 

  • Aimee S. Dunlap-Lehtilä and Jerry O. Wolff. The University of Memphis, Department of Biology, Memphis, TN 38152
      We conducted an experiment with prairie voles, Microtus ochrogaster, to discern between two alternative hypotheses for the advantages of multi-male mating (MMM) in female mammals. The two hypotheses are that MMM increases the chance of pregnancy and increases litter size, and that multiple copulations, rather than multiple partners affects litter size and the probability of pregnancy. We recorded the time, number, and sequence of copulations and the male(s) involved. Preliminary results suggest that litter size and probability of pregnancy are not significantly different for females who mated with one or with multiple males.
  •  11:15 THE FREQUENCY AND OCCURRENCE OF AGGRESSIVE BEHAVIOR IN A MALE LION-TAIL MACAQUE (MACACA SILENUS) POPULATION AND AN EXAMINATION OF THE EFFECTS OF KAVA KAVA (PIPER METHYSTICUM) ON AGGRESSION LEVELS. 

  • Grigg, April, J. A. Huggins and H. W. Wofford. Department of Biology, Union University, Jackson, TN.
      Four male lion-tail macaques (Macaca silenus) were observed for a total of ten hours over several days to determine the occurrence and frequency of aggressive behavior among them. The different types of behavior observed were described and categorized as either aggressive behavior or affiliative (friendly) behavior. Also, the effects of a mild relaxant called Kava Kava (Piper methysticum) were observed. The Kava reduced the percentage of aggressive behaviors from 63.1% to 54.6%. It reduced the aggressive acts by all of the subjects except for Johan, the dominant male, and Andre, the subdominant male. Overall, the Kava Kava did have a positive effect on the observed population in regard to aggression.
      This study was made possible by the assistance of Dr. Chuck Brady and the Memphis Zoo.
  • 11:30 Factors Influencing Nest Site Selection in Sliding Turtle, Trachemys scripta, in West Tennessee Population. 

  • Yelena A. Lapova, Christian Brothers University, Department of Biology, Memphis, Tennessee; Dr. Bill Gutzke and Don Thomas, Department of Biology, University of Memphis.
      Turtles do not provide parental care. Nest location affects survivorship (and gender) of the offspring. The aim of this study was to investigate microenvironmental factors influencing nest site selection in Trachemys scripta, the red-eared slider turtles. This study demonstrated that distance of nests from the nearest pond, soil type, amount of vegetation, and elevation influence nest site choice. Most nests were located in areas with high elevation, tall and abundant vegetation, and sandy soil. Turtles may choose high elevations in order to save incubating eggs and young from seasonal or interannual flooding. Abundant vegetation provides shade, presumably lowering nest temperature. This may result in male-based sex ratio. Turtles may choose to nest at the sites with certain amount of vegetation in order to balance gender ratio in the population. Tall vegetation may also protect nesting females from predators. Sandy soil likely conserves turtles excavating effort. Nest site selection patterns may have evolved to increase reproductive success of the species. Greater understanding of nest site selection will benefit the preservation of freshwater turtles. Department of Biology, University of Memphis, supported this project. 
  •  11:45 A long-term study of vertical migration in Chaoborus (Diptera: Insecta) larvae: Patterns over time and the role of Oxygen concentration. 

  • Heidi E. Rine and David H. Kesler. Department of Biology, Rhodes College, Memphis, Tennessee.
    The aquatic insect larvae of Chaoborus punctipennis exhibit diel vertical migration, remaining in deeper waters during the day and ascending at night. This behavior reduces visual predation on the larvae, but incurs costs. For the past 19 years, data were collected over a 24-hour period in the fall on water oxygen concentrations and depths of Chaoborus larvae in Poplar Tree Lake, Shelby County, Tennessee. We determined the mean depth at which larvae were found during the night and day of each sampling period. There was no consistent change in either mean nighttime or daytime depth over time (P>0.22). We assumed that an oxygen concentration below 2.0 mg/l can not be tolerated by fish. Comparison of the depths at which this critical oxygen concentration occurred with mean larval depth showed a significant correlation (P<0.05), suggesting that diel vertical migration is driven by fish predation.
    Session Two ends at 12:00 
    Lunch served at 12:15 
    in the Thomas Center Conference Room
       |Return to Program Contents|
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    Session Three
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    Chemistry/ Biochemistry
    Moderator: 
    Dr. Trey Brown
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    Session Three
    10:15-12:15 
    Room S214
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    Session Three:  Chemistry/ Biochemistry
    Moderator: Dr. Trey Brown, Assistant Professor of Biology, CBU
  • 10:15-12:15 
  • Room S214
  • 10:15 Differential Influence of Metal Ions In The HIV Integrase Active Site 

  • Mohsen Abu-Khudeir and Abby L. Parrill, Ph.D. (presentation by Dr. Parrill)  Department of Chemistry, The University of Memphis, Memphis, TN 38152-6060.
      Previous analyses have shown that the Human Immunodeficiency Virus integrase uses either manganese or magnesium ions to assemble as a stable complex on the donor substrate and to catalyze strand transfer whereas calcium ions support only assembly and cobalt ions support only catalysis. These metal ions clearly have different impacts on the function of the enzyme. These impacts may be due to minor geometric differences in the inner coordination sphere that propagate into nearby regions of the enzyme structure, thus affecting allosteric sites at which other viral proteins involved in the preintegration complex need to interact. We are concentrating now on the influence of metal ions in the integrase active site. The interactions of Mg2+, Mn2+, Ca2+, and Co2+ with the active site of integrase were investigated using quantum mechanical computations. Our results indicate that geometric differences induced by these ions are modest, but significant.
  •  Award Ribbon  10:30 Dimethylarginine Diaminohydrolase Activity in Mouse Tissue Supernatant 

  • James Allen (Christian Brothers University); Dyette Harper, (Lane College); Dr. Ellen Kang, (Department of Pediatrics, UT, Memphis).
      Asymmetric dimethylarginine (ADMA) is synthesized by dimethylation of arginine in non-histone nuclear proteins. It is usually disposed of through excretion in the urine and is broken down into L-citrulline and dimethylamine through hydrolysis by dimethylarginine diaminohydrolase (DDAH). The inhibition of DDAH would result in an accumulation of ADMA that would inhibit nitric oxide (NO) synthase. Despite regular dialysis, some patients with chronic renal failure (CRF) still have high levels of ADMA. Characterizing DDAH activity and optimizing the assay were explored as a prelude to the testing of the inhibition of DDAH activity in patients with CRF. Liver, lung, heart, kidney and brain tissues were assayed for DDAH activity while varying the protein amount, incubation time, and substrate concentration in the reaction. The optimizing of the enzyme assays were evaluated based both on the amount of product produced and the specific activity of the enzyme. The kinetic constants Km and Vmax were derived using Lineweaver-Burke plots. The Km value in the kidney is twice as much as in the liver, lung, heart and brain. This indicates that there may be two forms of the enzyme DDAH, one requiring twice as much ADMA for maximum activation as compared to the other. The results of the study should allow for the further testing of the inhibition of DDAH activity in patients with CRF.
      Funded by the Grant Fund: Reye's Symdrome 
  •  Award Ribbon  10:45  IL-17 RECEPTOR KNOCKOUT MICE EXHIBIT REDUCED RESISTANCE TO KLEBSIELLA PNEUMONIAE INFECTION.

  • F. H. (Rusty) Rodriguez1, P. Ye2, J.J. Peschon3, J. E. Shellito2, J. K. Kolls2. 1Department of Biology, Christian Brothers University, Memphis, TN. 2Section of Pulmonary/Critical Care, LSU Health Sciences Center, New Orleans, LA. 3Immunex Corporation, Seattle, WA.
    IL-17 is a pleiotropic cytokine largely restricted to CD4+ T-cells. Since IL-17 can increase the release of pro-inflammatory cytokines, we hypothesized that signaling via the IL-17 receptor is required for in vivo pulmonary host defense against bacteria. To test this, we challenged IL-17R knockout mice or C57Bl/6 controls with intranasally administered Klebsiella pneumoniae at 3 x 103 or 104 cfu/mouse. IL-17R knockout mice were found to be extraordinarily sensitive to this challenge with a much higher mortality than control mice (p <0.05).  We found that the absolute neutrophil count (ANC) both in BALF and blood in IL-17R knockout mice was significantly lower at all time points compared to control mice (p<0.05).  Lung and spleen histology from IL-17R knockout mice showed significantly more necrosis compared to control mice. These data demonstrate that signaling through the IL-17R is necessary for lung PMN recruitment and host defenses against Klebsiella pneumoniae. We speculate that relative IL-17 deficiency may in part explain the pulmonary host defect associated with either HIV infection or congenital immunodeficiency of CD4+ T-lymphocytes.
    Funded by: NHLBI: HL62052-01
  • 11:00 Testing Methods for the Characterization of Acrylic Type Copolymers 

  • Eric C. Epps and Daniel A. Lowy. University of Memphis, Department of Chemistry, Memphis, TN 38152-6060
    One main component of miniaturized reference electrodes (MREs) is the hydrogel-type copolymer matrix, in which the central reference element is imbedded. This copolymer matrix consists of acrylic acid and acrylonitrile, de-ionized water, and a supporting electrolyte (KCl or a quaternary ammonium salt). In order to obtain reliable and reproducible MREs series of tests were performed on copolymer samples of various composition. Thus, swelling/dissolution over time was monitored over 62 days for samples stored in de-ionized water or in organic solvents (methanol, acetonitrile, or methylene chloride). Also, drying/evaporation of samples, previously immersed in a liquid phase for 7 days, was examined in air and vacuum, over a time period encompassing two weeks. These tests allow for the determination of the media in which the electrodes can be employed and give an input on the wet/dry storage conditions of MREs.
  • 11:15 Electrochemical Testing of Nonpolarizable Electrodes Based on Silver-Silver Salt Internal Reference Elements. 

  • Nicholas I. Buss and Daniel A. Lowy The University of Memphis, Department of Chemistry, Memphis, TN 38152-6060
      We prepared nonpolarizable electrodes based on internal reference elements of silver wire coated with a low solubility silver salt, immersed in an acrylic type copolymer matrix. Next, we evaluated the stability of their electrode potential. For this, open circuit potential vs. time curves were recorded in chloride solutions, in the concentration range from 0.0001 to 3.0 mol L-1. Low sensitivity towards chloride ions and protons was determined as being 1.8-5.2 mV/log[Cl-] and 0.25 mV/pH, respectively. These electrodes can be used as miniaturized reference electrodes in potentiometric and voltammetric applications. They were employed successfully in both aqueous systems and organic supporting electrolytes (acetonitrile or methanol), without special pre-treatment or conditioning being necessary. Special attention was paid to determining the rate at which the electrode can adapt to its changing environment, when moved from water to an organic solvent, back and forth.
  • 11:30 Synthesis and Characterization of Substituted Cyclopentadienyl Cobalt Dicarbonyl Complexes that may form Chelates. 

  • Joseph Lovett and Randy Johnston. Union University, Department of Chemistry, Jackson, TN
      Two different cyclopentadienyl ligands which have substituents that may chelate to a metal center were prepared via nucleophilic substitution reactions of a thiol acid chloride and a thiol ether with sodium cyclopentadiene. The sodium or thallium salts of these ligands were isolated and characterized by FTIR. These salts were further reacted with Co(CO)4I in an attempt to form the corresponding cobalt dicarbonyl derivatives (i.e, (C5H4R)Co(CO)2 where R= C(O)CH2SCH3 and C(O)CH2CH2SCH3 ) . The compounds were characterized be FTIR and 1H NMR and were found to be impure and air sensitive.
  • 11:45 Detecting Pharmaceuticals in Wastewater, 

  • Kahalia Harris, Patrice Jackson, and Delphia Harris, Chemistry, LeMoyne-Owen College, 807 Walker Ave., Memphis, TN 38126.
      For years the major focus of environmental analysis and remediation has been devoted to priority pollutants. An emerging concern is the possible impact of Pharmaceuticals and Personal Care Products in the Environment. The first symposium on this topic in the United States will be held at the National American Chemical Society Meeting in San Francisco, March 26-30. Two additional conferences will address this issue in upcoming months. The purpose of this project is preliminary method development for the analysis of wastewater for acetaminophen, caffeine, and ibuprofen using gas chromatography- mass spectrometry.
  • 12:00 The Effects of Transline Herbicide on the Soil Nutrient Content when used in the Eradication of Kudzu Vine. 

  • Deborah Sloan, Dept. of Biology, Christian Brothers and Scott Franklin, Ph.D., Dept. of Biology,University of Memphis, Memphis, TN
    This research is part of a kudzu vine eradication study that has been in progress for several years by the faculty of the University of Memphis. This is a qualitative study of the soil nutrient content of three areas of the Meeman Shelby Forest Biological Center: Payne’s Pond, the control site, which had no kudzu vine growing on its banks; the South side of Kudzu Pond, which had kudzu vine growing on its banks that was previously treated with Transline herbicide; and the North side of Kudzu Pond, where kudzu vine grew unchecked. Transline herbicide is a product with the chemical name 3,6-dichloro-2-pyridinecarboxylic acid. Transline is a ‘hormone’ herbicide that promotes lethally abnormal growth in treated plants. Four soil samples, each containing seven random cores, were collected from each of the 3 test sites. These 12 samples were analyzed for the following: nitrogen, water pH, phosphorus, potassium, calcium, magnesium, zinc, iron, manganese, and soluble salts. The results were analyzed using the SAS system using a MANOVA procedure. Pillai’s Trace statistic for phosphorus levels and pH levels showed significant differences between the three sites. The project was funded by the University of Memphis. 

    Above: Session 3 in S214.  Jim Allen, Dr. Dennis Merat, Dr. Marguerite Cooper.
    Session Three ends at 12:15.
    Lunch served at 12:15
    in the Thomas Center Conference Room
    |Return to Program Contents|

    Lunch
     ~~~
    Session Four
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    Cell and 
    Molecular 
    Biology: 
    Role in Identification 
    of Diseases
    Moderator:  Dr. Mary Ogilvie
    ~~~
    Session Four: 1:30-3:00 
    Room S153
    ~~~
    Session Four:  Cell and Molecular Biology and Their Role in Identification of Diseases
    Moderator:  Dr. Mary Ogilvie, Associate Professor of Biology, CBU
  • 1:30-3:00 
  • Room S153
  • 1:15 Association of Bronchial Pulmonary Dysphasia and Mortality. 

  • Neetu Patel1 Malinda Fitzgerald1 and Dennis T. Crouse2. Department of Biology, Christian Brothers University1 and SIU School of Medicine, Division of Neonatology, Dept. of Pediatrics, Springfield, IL (formerly Department of Pediatrics, University of TN. Memphis2)
       [Abstract not available.]
  • 1:45 N-Benzyladriamycine-14-valerate (AD 198) circumvents Bcl-2 but does not directly induce cytochrome c release from mitochondria. 

  • Amanda Frazier, Dept.of Biol. Christian Brothers University and Len Lothstein, Dept. of Pharmacol. UT, Memphis.
      Apoptosis is a cellular response to cytotoxic drugs in which cytochrome c (cyt c) and apoptosis inducing factor (AIF) are released from mitochondria to effect cell death through controlled dismemberment of cell structure. Overexpression of the mitochondrial membrane protein Bcl-2 blocks the release of cyt c and AIF. Consequently, Bcl-2 is an impediment to drug-induced apoptosis and is a significant clinical problem in the treatment of cancer. However, apoptosis induced by the doxorubicin analog, AD 198 is unaffected by Bcl-2 through a mechanism which may either inactivate Bcl-2 or circumvent the effects of Bcl-2. The goal of this research project was to determine whether AD 198 could directly induce the release of cyt c from mitochondria expressing Bcl-2, and, in doing so, circumvent Bcl-2 activity directly. Purified mitochondria from 32D mouse myeloid leukemia cells (C1) and 32D cells overexpressing Bcl-2 (C3) were treated with AD 198 followed by immunological detection of cyt c released from the mitochondria. AD 198 was unable to directly induce the release of cyt c in C1 cells at levels higher than solvent controls or the positive control, betulinic acid, a compound previously shown to directly induce cyt c release from mitochondria. These results suggest: AD 198 may be circumventing Bcl-2 by releasing cyt c from the mitochondria indirectly or by stimulating the execution phase of apoptosis without the need for cyt c release. 
      Funded by the UT Medical Group/Moreton Cancer Research Endowment and the Susan G. Komen Breast Cancer Research Foundation.
  •  Award Ribbon  2:00 Upregulation of MDR1 by mutant p53 requires interaction with a cellular protein 

  • Amisha Gandhi1, J. Sampath2, L. H. Shapiro3, G. P. Zambetti4, K. W. Scotto5, J. D. Schuetz2 Departments of 1Biology, Christian Brothers University, Memphis, TN; 2Pharmaceutical Sciences, 3Pathology, 4Biochemistry, St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital, Memphis, TN; and 5Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Institute, New York City, NY
       We have recently shown that endogenous MDR1 (multi drug resistance) gene is up regulated by mutant p53-281G. To determine the mechanism, deletion analysis was performed and revealed upregulation of the MDR1 basal promoter (-107/+30) by p53-281G and other p53 mutants. Further deletions identified a specific region required for upregulation by mutant p53. This region contained an Ets binding site. Loss of the Ets-site (deletion or specific mutation) decreased basal MDR1 transcription. Specific mutation of the Ets-site in the basal MDR1 promoter abrogated transactivation by mutant p53s. However, decreased basal transcription was not responsible for impaired mutant p53 transactivation because MDR1 NFY promoter mutants retain transactivation by mutant p53 despite dramatically reduced basal activity. Previous studies suggested that mutant p53s required and interacted with cellular proteins. Because of these findings, we used invitro studies to demonstrate p53-281G specifically interacted with the Ets-1 protein in pull down assays. Cumulatively, these studies suggest that MDR1 activation in vivo by mutant p53s require the cellular protein, Ets-1.
      Supported by NIH Grant ES/GM 5851 and the American Lebanese Associated Charities
  •  Award Ribbon  2:15 GENETIC POLYMORPHISMS IN TUMOR NECROSIS FACTOR-ALPHA GENE AND THE DEVELOPMENT OF PREECLAMPSIA-- a preliminary study. 

  • Kathrin L. Brown, Department of Biology, Christian Brothers University and Jeffery Livingston, M.D., Dept of Obstetrics and Gynecology, UT Memphis.
      Objective: The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship between the severity of preeclampsia with the occurrence of the genetic polymorphism in the TNFa gene and the plasma levels of TNFa. Study Design: In a prospective case controlled study, genetic polymorphisms in the TNFa gene associated with increased TNFa levels were studied in 114 women with severe preeclampsia and 94 normal pregnant controls. Maternal and umbilical chord blood was obtained at the time of delivery and DNA extracted. Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR) was performed and separated by gel electrophoresis. Phenotype frequencies were calculated. Plasma levels of TNFa were measured using an ELISA. Results: The mean maternal TNFa plasma levels in preeclampic patients were not significantly different from control patients. Moreover, there were no differences in phenotype frequencies between the TNFa mutation and the normal phenotype. Conclusion: We conclude that maternal and fetal TNFa polymorphisms may not be associated with severe preeclampsia. In addition, plasma levels of TNFa are not elevated in severe preeclampsia. 
      Supported by: Department of Obstetrics and Gyncology, UT Memphis.
  • 2:30 THE EXPRESSION OF IL-6, ICAM-1, AND CRP IN NECROTIZING ENTERCOLITIS (NEC). 

  • Nesreen Ismail*, Malinda E.C. Fitzgerald* and Dennis T. Crouse#. Biol. Dept., Christian Brothers University, Memphis, TN* & SIC School of Medicine, Division of Neonatology, Dept. of Pediatrics, Springfield, IL#.
      [Abstract not available.]
  • 2:45 PLASMA, URINARY, AND SALIVARY 8-EPI-PROSTAGLANDIN F2_ LEVELS IN NORMOTENSIVE AND PREECLAMPTIC PREGNANCIES. 

  • Sean Hunt*, Elizabeth T. McKinney#, Reza Shouri#, Robert A. Ahokas#, and Baha M. Sibai#. Dept. of Biology, Christian Brothers University *, and Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, UT Memphis#.
    • Objective: To measure and compare plasma, urinary and salivary 8-epi-prostaglandin F2_ (8 isoprostane) concentrations in women with normotensive pregnancies to respective concentrations in pregnancies complicated by preeclampsia. Study Design: Plasma, urinary and salivary 8-isoprostane levels were measured in preeclamptic (n=40), normotensive (n=20) and nonpregnant women (n=10). One-way analysis of variance was used to determine significant differences. Results: plasma free 8-isoprostane concentrations were increased in women with severe preeclampsia (342 ± 50 pg/ml) compared to nonpregnant (129 ± 17 pg/ml) and normotensive (150 ± 11 pg/ml) pregnant women (p=0.003, and 0.0001, respectively). Urinary excretion of 8-isoprostane was slightly, but not significantly decreased in preeclampsia (1200 ± 227 pg/ml) as compared to nonpregnant (1625 ± 364) and normotensive pregnant women (2149 ± 432 pg/ml). Salivary concentrations of 8-isoprostane were increased in normotensive pregnancies (496 ± 113 pg/ml) compared to nonpregnant women (150 ± 27 pg/ml) but were not related to preeclampsia (419 ± 96 pg/ml), p <= 0.003. Conclusions: Free 8-isoprostane concentrations are increased in the plasma of women with severe preeclampsia. Further studies are warranted to determine whether such increases are due to an increase in phospholipase A2 activity, or in lipid peroxidation, or to a decrease in renal excretion.
    Session Four ends at 3:00 
    Awards Ceremony in Room S153 at 3:30
    |Return to Program Contents|
    ~~~
    Session Five
    ~~~
    Physics/ 
    Physical 
    Science
    and
    Mathematics
    Moderator:  Dr. Marguerite Cooper
    ~~~
    Session Five: 
    1:30-2:45
    Room S155
    ~~~
    Session Five:  Physics/ Physical Sciences 
    and Mathematics
    Moderator: Dr. Marguerite Cooper, Associate Professor of Chemistry, CBU
  • 1:30-2:45
  • Room S155 
  • 1:30 Locally strong ground shaking suggested by a possible liquifaction field above the Saline River fault zone in the Southern Mississippi Embayment. 

  • Cox, R.T. and Jeremy McHugh. University of Memphis, Department of Geological Sciences, Memphis, TN 38152
    Recent field studies, geomorphic analysis, and aligned earthquakes outline a newly recognized Quaternary fault system in the Southern Mississippi Embayment. Eight earthquakes M>3 (two M>4) have been recorded along the Saline River fault zone. At the southeast limit of the fault zone there is a 10-km diameter field of surficial sand bodies that have many of the characteristics of seismically generated sand blows. An electrical conductivity survey of one sand body revealed a linear pattern of anomalously low conductivity running through it. Grain size analysis of another sand body showed a fining up trend. The diameter of this possible liquifaction field suggests a M 5 to 6 event during the mid to late Holocene.
  • 1:45 Cancelled A Re-examination of Heliacal Rise and Set Phenomena for Bright Stars in the Mayan Sky 

  • Shabnam Kaderi, Department of Physics-Univ. of Memphis, Memphis, TN
      The annual appearance of a bright star on the horizon in the pre-dawn or post-sunset sky is a visual event that constitutes a manifestation of nature’s calendar. As a result, such rise-set occurrences were of great importance to ancient civilizations such as the Native-Americans, and were recorded and predicted by early astronomers in order to establish important civil, religious, and agricultural dates in their year. The Maya, in particular, recorded their observations in ancient texts called codices. Mathematical calculations of these dates based on modern astronomy have been made for comparison with the Mayan codices. In the present work, planetarium software is used to simulate heliacal rising and setting dates of stars in the Mayan sky and the results compared to earlier mathematical calculations and ancient Mayan texts.
  • 2:00  Measuring the Densities of Solar Prominences. 

  • Lauren E. Mize, Thomas E. Holzer, Holly R. Gilbert, and Robert M. MacQueen. High Altitude Observatory National Center for Atmospheric Research, and Rhodes College, Memphis, TN
      Solar prominences are semi-stable structures which appear to protrude off the edge, or limb, of the sun. They can be characterized as cool (5000-6000 K) plasma suspended in the hot (1-2 million K) solar corona by complex magnetic field structures. Prominences may erupt, resulting in an ejection of material from the sun, but the exact causes of such eruptions are not known. In order to better understand the structure and activity of solar prominences, we devised a new method of determining their densities. We acquired data from a satellite-borne instrument which creates images of the sun in extreme ultraviolet wavelengths. Using these images, we measured the intensity of radiation in the region of the prominence and accounted for radiation originating in front of the prominence as well as that originating behind it. 
  •  Award Ribbon  2:15 A study of Ray-like Solar Coronal Mass Ejections. 

  • Elizabeth Serex, Holly Gilbert, Tom Holzer, and Robert MacQueen. High Altitude Observatory National Center for Atmospheric Research, and Rhodes College, Memphis, TN.
      Coronal mass ejections happen when the sun emits enormous amounts of its mass and energy into interplanetary space. These events, which are not well understood, can occur several times daily, reaching speeds of several hundred kilometers per second. Named for their appearance, ray-like CME's appear to be physically simpler than other types of CMEs. Using various wavelengths of electromagnetic energy, this study aims to examine some properties of several ray-like events in order to gain insight into understanding the physics of all CMEs. 
  •  Award Ribbon  2:30 A Generalization and Analysis of Lambert’s W-Function.

  • Roberto E. Martinez and Leigh Becker. Department of Mathematics, Christian Brothers University. Memphis TN.
    The W-function proposed by Johann Heinrich Lambert was modified into a general transcendental form and studied. Also, the lb-function, an infinitely-iterated logarithmic function, and the hb-function, an infinitely-iterated exponential function—both of base b —were found to be fundamental to the construction of the solution sets of the modified W-function. Certain solution sets, however, exhibited unstable and stable equilibria, period-2 and period-4 behavior, and self-similarity upon tetration.
    Session Five ends at 2:45
    Awards Ceremony at 3:30 in Room S153
      |Return to Program Contents|
    Corrections to Abstracts? Abstracts as they appear in the printed program will be forwarded to TAS for publication.
    TAS
    @
    CBU
    2000

    ~~~

    Index of
    Presenting
    Authors
     
     
     

    ~~~
     

    Click the 
    "hot link"
    (name)
    to jump
    to the
    abstract
     
     

    ~~~
     
     
     
     

    Index of Presenting Authors
     
     
     

    ~~~
     

    Click the 
    "hot link"
    (name)
    to jump
    to the
    abstract
     
     

    ~~~
     
     

    Click the 
    "hot link"
    (name)
    to jump
    to the
    abstract
     
     

    ~~~
     

    Click the 
    "hot link"
    (name)
    to jump
    to the
    abstract
     

    ~~~

    Index of Presenting Authors
     
     

    ~~~
     

    Click the 
    "hot link"
    (name)
    to jump
    to the
    abstract

    ~~~

    Award Ribbon1. James Allen, Dyette Harper, and Dr. Ellen Kang. Dimethylarginine Diaminohydrolase Activity in Mouse Tissue Supernatant. Department of Biology, Christian Brothers, Lane College, Department of Pediatrics, University of Tennessee, Memphis TN.  Session Three: Room S214 10:30
    2. Jarad Braddy1 and S. Frase2. Development of Microwave-Assisted Decalcification Protocol: Comparison with Standard Techniques. Dept. of Biology1, Christian Bros. University; Integrated Microscopy Center2, University of Memphis, TN. Session One: Room S155: 10:30
    Award Ribbon  3. Kathrin L. Brown, and Jeffery Livingston, M.D., GENETIC POLYMORPHISMS IN TUMOR NECROSIS FACTOR-ALPHA GENE AND THE DEVELOPMENT OF PREECLAMPSIA-a preliminary study. Department of Biology, Christian Brothers University Dept of Obstetrics and Gynecology, UT Memphis. Session Four: Room S153: 2:15 
    4. Nicholas I. Buss and Daniel A. Lowy. Electrochemical Testing of Nonpolarizable Electrodes Based on Silver-Silver Salt Internal Reference Elements. Department of Chemistry, The University of Memphis, Memphis, TN.  Session Three: Room 214: 11:15.
    5. J. Michelle Chang*, M. Galarreta# and S. Hestrin#, Classification and Correlation of Nonpyramidal Neurons Using Morphology and Physiology. Dept. of Biology, Christian Brothers University* and Dept. of Anatomy and Neurobiology, University of TN#. Session One: Room S155: 11:00
    Award Ribbon  6. Aimee S. Dunlap-Lehtiläand Jerry O. Wolff. Consequences of multi-male mating in female voles. , Department of Biology, The University of Memphis, Memphis, TN. Session Two: Room S153: 11:00.
    7. Eric C. Epps and Daniel A. Lowy. Testing Methods for the Characterization of Acrylic Type Copolymers. Department of Chemistry, The University of Memphis, Memphis, TN. Session Three: Room S214: 11:00
    Award Ribbon  8. Amy Fallon*, D.A. Johnson#, and M.E.C. Fitzgerald* The Role of Polyamines in Migration of Cultured Retinal Pigment Epithelial Cells. Christian Brothers Univ., Dept. of Biol.* and UT, Memphis, Dept. Ophthalmolgy#. Session One: Room S155: 11:45
    9. Amanda Frazier, and Len Lothstein. N-Benzyladriamycine-14-valerate (AD 198) circumvents Bcl-2 but does not directly induce cytochrome c release from mitochondria. Dept.of Biol. Christian Brothers University and Dept. of Pharmacol. UT, Memphis.  Session Four : Room S153: 1:45
    Award Ribbon  10. Amisha. Gandhi1, J. Sampath2, L. H. Shapiro3, G. P. Zambetti4, K. W. Scotto5, and J. D. Schuetz2. Upregulation of MDR1 by mutant p53 requires interaction with a cellular protein.Departments of 1Biology, Christian Brothers University, Memphis, TN; 2Pharmaceutical Sciences, 3Pathology, 4Biochemistry, St. Jude Children's Research Hospital, Memphis, TN; and 5Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Institute, New York City, NY. Session Four: Room S153: 2:00.
    11. April Grigg, J. A. Huggins and H. W. Wofford. The frequency and occurrence of aggressive behavior in a male lion-tail macaque (Macaca silenus) population and an examination of the effects of Kava kava (Piper methysticum) on aggression levels. Department of Biology, Union University, Jackson, TN. Session Two: Room S153: 11:15.
    12. Kahalia Harris, Patrice Jackson, and Delphia Harris. Detecting Pharmaceuticals in Wastewater.  Department of Chemistry, LeMoyne-Owen College, 807 Walker Ave., Memphis TN. Session Three:  Room S214: 11:45
    13. Karen Hill, and Dave Vogel. The analysis of vaporized hydrogen peroxide parameter using design of experiments. Department of Biology, Christian Brothers University and Smith & Nephew Orthopaedics. Session One: Room S155: 10:45
    14. Sean Hunt*, Elizabeth T. McKinney#, Reza Shouri#, Robert A. Ahokas#, and Baha M. Sibai#. Plasma, urinary, and salivary 8-epi-prostaglandin F2_ levels in normotensive and preeclamptic pregnancies. Dept. of Biology, Christian Brothers University *, and Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, UT Memphis#. Session Four: Room S 153: 2:45
    15. Nesreen Ismail*, Malinda E.C. Fitzgerald* and Dennis T. Crouse#. The expression of IL-6, ICAM-1, and CRP in Necrotizing Entercolitis (NEC).Biol. Dept., Christian Brothers University, Memphis, TN* & SIU School of Medicine, Division of Neonatology, Dept. of Pediatrics, Springfield, IL# (formerly of Department of Pediatrics, UT-Memphis).Session Four Room S153: 2:30.
    16. Shabnam Kaderi. Cancelled. A Re-examination of Heliacal Rise and Set Phenomena for Bright Stars in the Mayan Sky Department of Physics-Univ. of Memphis, Memphis, TN.  Session Five: Room S 155: 1:45
    17. Mohsen Abu-Khudeir and Abby L. Parrill. (presentation by Dr. Parrill)  Differential Influence of Metal Ions In The HIV Integrase Active Site. Department of Chemistry, The University of Memphis, Memphis, TN. Session Three: Room S214: 10:15. 
    18. Brock Lanier and Dr. Carolyn Jaslow. Changes in Rat Cranial Suture Morphology. Rhodes College, Department of Biology, Memphis, TN. Session One: Room S155: 10:15. 
    19. Yelena A. Lapova*, Dr. Bill Gutzke# and Don Thomas#, Factors Influencing Nest Site Selection in Sliding Turtle, Trachemys scripta, in West Tennessee Population. *Christian Brothers University, Department of Biology, Memphis, Tennessee and #Department of Biology, University of Memphis. Session Two: Room S 153: 11:30.
    20. Danielle N. Lee and Michael H. Ferkin. The response of male meadow voles to the scent mark of female conspecifics in different reproductive states. Department of Biology, University of Memphis, Memphis, TN. Session Two: Room S 153: 10:15. 
    21. Joseph Lovett and Randy Johnston. Synthesis and Characterization of Substituted Cyclopentadienyl Cobalt Dicarbonyl Complexes that may form Chelates. Department of Chemistry, Union University, Jackson, TN. Session Three: Room S 214: 11:30. 
    Award Ribbon  22. Roberto E. Martinez and Leigh Becker. A Generalization and Analysis of Lambert's W-Function. Department of Mathematics, Christian Brothers University, Memphis TN. Session Five: Room S155: 2:30
    23. Jeremy McHugh and Cox, R.T. Locally strong ground shaking suggested by a possible liquifaction field above the Saline River fault zone in the Southern Mississippi Embayment. Department of Geological Sciences, University of Memphis, Memphis, TN. Session Five: Room S155: 1:30. 
    24. Lauren E. Mize, Thomas E. Holzer, Holly R. Gilbert, and Robert M. MacQueen. Measuring the Densities of Solar Prominences. High Altitude Observatory National Center for Atmorspheric Reserch, and Rhodes College, Memphis, TN. Session Five: Room S155: 2:00. 
    25. Neetu Patel1, Malinda Fitzgerald1 and Dennis T. Crouse2. Association of Bronchial Pulmonary Dysphasia and Mortality. Department of Biology, Christian Brothers University1 and SIU School of Medicine, Division of Neonatology, Dept. of Pediatrics, Springfield, IL. (formerly of Department of Pediatrics, UT- Memphis2).Session Four: Room S 153: 1:15
    26. Tejal Patel, Department of Biology, Christian Brothers University, Barbara Benstein, MS, Department of Clinical Laboratory Sciences, UT, and Dennis Crouse, MD, PhD, SIU School of Medicine, Division of Neonatology, Dept. of Pediatrics, Springfield, IL. (formerly of Department of Pediatrics, University of TN,  Memphis). Isolation of Ureaplasma urealyticum from Lung Tissue of Neonates.  Session One: Room S155: 11:30
    27. Heidi E. Rine and David H. Kesler. A long-term study of vertical migration in Chaoborus (Diptera: Insecta) larvae: Patterns over time and the role of Oxygen concentration.  Department of Biology, Rhodes College, Memphis, Tennessee. Session Two:  Room S153 11:45.
    Award Ribbon28. F. H. (Rusty) Rodriguez1, P. Ye2, J.J. Peschon3, J. E. Shellito2, J. K. Kolls2. IL-17 receptor knockout mice exhibit reduced resistance to Klebsiella pneumoniae infection. 1Department of Biology, Christian Brothers University, Memphis, TN.  2Section of Pulmonary/Critical Care, LSU Health Sciences Center, New Orleans, LA. 3Immunex Corporation, Seattle, WA.   Session Three : Room S 214: 10:45
    Award Ribbon  29. Elizabeth Serex, Holly Gilbert, Tom Holzer, and Robert MacQueen. A study of Ray-like Solar Coronal Mass Ejections. High Altitude Observatory National Center for Atmospheric Research, and Rhodes College, Memphis, TN. Session Five: Room S 155: 2:15. 
    30. Deborah Sloan, and Scott Franklin, Ph.D.  The Effects of Transline Herbicide on the Soil Nutrient Content when used in the Eradication of Kudzu Vine. Dept. of Biology, Christian Brothers and Dept. of Biology, University of Memphis, Memphis, TN. Session Three: S214: 12:00
    31. Mary Carole Taylor*, Victoria Brower Ph.D#. and Shannon Matta Ph.D#. Patterns of Self-Administration in Rats Acquiring Nicotine Addiction. *Biology Dept., Christian Brothers University, and #Dept. Pharmacology, UT-Memphis. Session Two: Room S153: 10:45
    32. Mandy McGill Tillery, J. A. Huggins and H. W. Wofford. Aggressive interactions and behaviors of three, male Western lowland gorillas (Gorilla gorilla gorilla). Department of Biology, Union University, Jackson TN.  Session Two: Room S153: 10:30
    Award Ribbon  33. Nicole Walker1, Eric Laywell2, Dennis Steindler2, and Malinda Fitzgerald1, 2 Morphological investigation of neurospheres. 1CBU Biology Dept. and  2Univ. of Tennessee, Dept.of Anatomy and Neuroscience, Memphis. Session One: Room S155: 11:15.
    |Return to Program Contents|
    Session
    Judges
    Session Judges for the Best Paper Awards

    Session One: Experimental Methods and Morphological Assessment

    • Dr. Charlie Biggers, Department of Biology, University of Memphis
    • Mr. Zach Maxwell, School of Medicine, UT Memphis 
    • Ms. Sharon Frase, Integrative Microscopy Center, University of Memphis
    Session Two: Organismal Biology and Behavior
    • Dr. Chris Meade, Department of Anatomy and Neurobiology, UT Memphis
    • Ms. Lyndsey Woodward, Maternal and Fetal Research, UT Memphis
    • Dr. Linda Brinkley, Vice Provost for Research, University of Memphis
    Session Three: Chemistry/Biochemistry
    • Dr. Bill Busler, Department of Chemistry, CBU
    • Dr. Bill Thierfelder, Department of Biology, Crichton 
    • Brother Matthew Smith, Department of Chemistry, CBU
    Session Four: Cell and Molecular Biology and Their Role in Identification of Diseases
    • Dr. Linda Brinkley, Vice President for Research, University of Memphis
    • Dr. Jay Blundon, Department of Biology Rhodes College
    • Dr. Bill Thierfelder, Department of Biology, Crichton College
    Session Five: Physics/Physical Sciences and Mathematics
    • Dr. John Varriano, Chariman Department of Physics, CBU
    • Dr. Bill Busler, Department of Chemistry, CBU 
    • Brother Matthew Smith, F.S.C., Department of Chemistry, CBU

    Above: Zach Maxwell, Dr. Charle Biggers, Sharon Frase.

    Above: Lindsay Woodward, Zach Maxwell,  Radha Gandhi.
    |Return to Program Contents|
    Award Ribbon

    Best
    Paper
    Awards

    Awards
    are
    presented
    for the
    best
    paper(s)
    in each
    of the
    five
    sessions.

    ~~~

    Click the 
    "hot link"
    (name)
    to jump
    to the
    abstract

    ~~~

    Best Paper Awards

    Best Paper Award Winners (from left to right): Elizabeth Serex (Rhodes), Amy Fallon (CBU), Roberto Martinez (CBU), Amisha Gandhi (CBU), Kathrin Brown (CBU), Rusty Rodriguez (CBU), and Aimee S. Dunlop-Lehtila (U. Memphis).  Winners not pictured are Nicole Walker (CBU) and James Allen (CBU).
  • Session One: Experimental Methods and Morphological Assessment
    • Amy Fallon  Christian Brothers University

    • The Role of Polyamines in Migration of Cultured Retinal Pigment Epithelial Cells.  Amy Fallon*, D.A. Johnson#, and M.E.C. Fitzgerald* Christian Brothers Univ., Dept. of Biol.* and UT, Memphis, Dept. Ophthalmolgy#.
    • Nicole Walker Christian Brothers University

    • Morphological investigation of neurospheres. Nicole Walker1, Eric Laywell2, Dennis Steindler2, and Malinda Fitzgerald1, 2  1Christian Brothers Univ., Dept. of Biol.; 2UT Memphis, Dept. of Anatomy and Neuroscience.
  • Session Two: Organismal Biology and Behavior
    •  Aimee S. Dunlap-LehtiläUniversity of Memphis

    • Consequences of multi-male mating in female voles. Aimee S. Dunlap-Lehtilä  and Jerry O. Wolff. University of Memphis, Department of Biology, Memphis, TN 38152
  • Session Three: Chemistry/Biochemistry
  • James Allen  Christian Brothers University

  • Dimethylarginine Diaminohydrolase Activity in Mouse Tissue Supernatant.  James Allen(Christian Brothers University); Dyette Harper, (Lane College); Dr. Ellen Kang, (Department of Pediatrics, UT, Memphis).
  • F. H. (Rusty) RodriguezChristian Brothers University

  • IL-17 Receptor knockout mice exhibit reduced resistance to  Klebsiella pneumoniae  infection. F. H. (Rusty) Rodriguez1, P. Ye2, J.J. Peschon3, J. E. Shellito2, J. K. Kolls2. 1Department of Biology, Christian Brothers University, Memphis, TN. 2Section of Pulmonary/Critical Care, LSU Health Sciences Center, New Orleans, LA. 3Immunex Corporation, Seattle, WA.
  • Session Four: Cell and Molecular Biology and Their Role in Identification of Diseases
    •  Kathrin L. Brown Christian Brothers University

    • Genetic polymorphisms in tumor necrosis factor-alpha gene and the development of preeclampsia-- a preliminary study.  Kathrin L. Brown, Department of Biology, Christian Brothers University and Jeffery Livingston, M.D., Dept of Obstetrics and Gynecology, UT Memphis.
    • Amisha. Gandhi  Christian Brothers University

    • Upregulation of MDR1 by mutant p53 requires interaction with a cellular protein.  Amisha Gandhi1, J. Sampath2, L. H. Shapiro3, G. P. Zambetti4, K. W. Scotto5, J. D. Schuetz2 Departments of 1Biology, Christian Brothers University, Memphis, TN; 2Pharmaceutical Sciences, 3Pathology, 4Biochemistry, St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital, Memphis, TN; and 5Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Institute, New York City, NY
  • Session Five: Physics/Physical Sciences and Mathematics
    • Roberto E. Martinez Christian Brothers University

    • A Generalization and Analysis of Lambert’s W-Function. Roberto E. Martinez and Leigh Becker. Department of Mathematics, Christian Brothers University.
    • Elizabeth Serex  Rhodes College

    • A study of Ray-like Solar Coronal Mass Ejections. Elizabeth Serex, Holly Gilbert, Tom Holzer, and Robert MacQueen. High Altitude Observatory National Center for Atmospheric Research, and Rhodes College, Memphis, TN.
    Summary
    ~~~
    Schedule
    of
    Events

    ~~~

    TAS
    @
    CBU
    2000

    Tennessee Academy of Science
    March 25, 2000
    Christian Brothers University
    • Registration in the Lobby of the Science Building (Outside of Rooms S151, S153, S155)
      • Coffee and Muffins 
      • 8:00-8:40 Science Building Lobby
    • Welcoming Remarks by CBU President Brother Stan Sobczyk 
      • 8:45 Room S153
    • Introduction of Keynote Speaker by Dr. Malinda Fitzgerald  S153
    • Keynote Address Room S153
      • Dr. Linda Pifer, Professor of Clinical Medical Sciences University of TN, Memphis "Brave New World: Biotech Explosion of the 21st Century"
    Morning Paper Sessions
    • Session One: Experimental Methods and Morphological Assessment
      • 10:15 to 12:00 Room S155
      • Moderator: Brother Edward Salgado, F.S.C., Ph.D. Associate Professor and Chair of Biology, CBU
    • Session Two: Organismal Biology and Behavior
      •  10:15 to 12:15 Room S153
      •  Moderator: Dr. Anna Ross, Associate Professor of Biology, CBU
    • Session Three: Chemistry/Biochemistry
      •  10:15-12:00 Room S214
      •  Moderator: Dr. R. Trey Brown, Assistant Professor of Biology, CBU
    LUNCH
    12:15-1:20 Thomas Center Conference Room

    Afternoon Paper Sessions

    • Session Four: Cell and Molecular Biology and Their Role in Identification of Diseases
      •  1:30 to 3:00 Room S153
      •  Moderator: Dr. Mary Ogilvie, Associate Professor of Biology, CBU
    • Session Five: Physics/Physical Sciences and Mathematics
      •  1:30 to 2:45 Room S155
      •  Moderator Dr. Marguerite Cooper, Associate Professor of Chemistry, CBU
    • Break from 3:00-3:30 for Judges Meeting
    • Award Ceremony Room S153 Beginning at 3:30 
      • General Business Meeting for TN Academy
    |Return to Program Contents|
    TAS 2000 ~ Photo Gallery
    Registration and coffee break in the Auditorium Lobby

    Above: Dr. Bill Thierfelder, Ms. Sharon Frase, and Dr. Linda Brinkley

    Dr. Pifer's Keynote Address

    Above: Some of Dr. Pifer's audience in S153

    Lunch


    Above: Session 3 in S214.  Jim Allen, Dr. Dennis Merat, Dr. Marguerite Cooper.

    Above: Judges confer.  Zach Maxwell, Dr. Charle Biggers, Sharon Frase

    Left: Lindsay Woodward, Zach Maxwell,  Radha Gandhi.

    Best Paper Award Winners (above, from left to right): Elizabeth Serex (Rhodes), Amy Fallon (CBU), Roberto Martinez (CBU), Amisha Gandhi (CBU), Kathrin Brown (CBU), Rusty Rodriguez (CBU), and Aimee S. Dunlop-Lehtila (U. Memphis).  Winners not pictured are Nicole Walker (CBU) and James Allen (CBU).

    Above: Nicole Walker, Amanda Frazier, Jarad Braddy, Amy Fallon, and Tim O'Leary.

    Above: Nesreen Ismail, Karen Hill, Neetu Pael, Tejal Patel, and Dr. Mary Ogilvie.

     
    TAS @ CBU 2000
    Biology Department
    Christian Brothers University
      CBU Biology Webmaster:
    E-mail: aross@cbu.edu
     Anna E. Ross, Ph.D.
     Associate Professor of Biology

    [This page updated July 2000 ~ AER]