Note from the Dean
Snow again this year!

The first day of class - wasn't!

Our first day of class this spring semester wasn't. We were snowed in. We also lost a second, a third, and half of a fourth class day to snow this year, and we are not out of the snowy woods yet! However, if you look at how the rest of the country got hammered with snow this winter, I guess we are pretty lucky! The faculty in the School of Sciences are using various methods to make up for the missed class and lab time. Personally, I'm adding 5 minutes onto my MWF classes, a strategy that I used when we were undergoing the new construction and renovation back in 2008. It certainly is not convenient for either me or my students, but we must adapt. What makes it very do-able for me is that I really like the physics that I teach!

The School of Sciences remains a very busy and active place as you can see by the many "News of the Moment" items. Our alums also remain very active and very successful - see the many Alumni Notes below. It makes me very appreciative of the faculty and of the students who put so much effort into their studies. Where did this desire for excellence come from? In looking back over the many years I've been here, a tradition of excellence had been established that we presently try to maintain. That tradition comes from the Lasallian mission and from the long-serving faculty, both past and present. I thought it would be appropriate to recognize those faculty members who have spent so much of their working life in the School of Sciences at CBU. To do this, we have mounted a plaque in the entryway of the Cooper-Wilson Center for the Life Sciences with the names of all of the people who have served at least 20 years and/or who have earned the status of professor emeritus. I have also created a Faculty Icon web page with the names of these dedicated people. See the featured article on this below.

I hope you are enjoying these newsletters, and I look forward to sharing more of our work with you next month. If you have comments, questions or reactions, you may send an e-mail now to jholmes@cbu.edu .


News of the Moment

Beta Beta Beta held its annual Bowlathon on Friday, November 19th at Billy Hardwick's to support Hope North in Uganda. CBU4VC members were also in attendance in efforts to raise money for Uganda via Arudo Yat jewelry, all handmade pieces from Africa! There were 19 teams that participated in bowling including an alumni and a faculty team! The winners are as follows:
1st = Sigma Alpha Epsilon
2nd = Kappa Sigma
3rd = American Society of Chemical Engineers
Individual with highest average: Velita Thornton.
Amount collected to date: $1,500. All proceeds go to benefit The Ugandan refugees. Thanks to everyone who turned out to support this incredibly important cause. Special thanks to Kelly Jeu who was the Bowlathon committee chair for Beta Beta Beta.

The following science students accepted the invitation to join Alpha Chi: Larry Anderson, chemistry and biology; Nick Selvo; chemistry; Thomas Schill, physics and math.


Brittany Course and Allan Killen at the national math meeting

Brittany Course and Alan Killen at the national
Joint Mathematics meetings in New Orleans.

Brittany Course, Mathematics & Computer Science 2011, Alan Killen, Mathematics & Civil Engineering 2011, and Professor Cathy Carter, Mathematics, presented a paper on Folding Math Together: A Senior Seminar in Origami at the Joint Mathematics Meetings in New Orleans on January 6-9. More than 6,000 other mathematicians attended the conference.

Kyle Hayes, Biology 2011, presented a paper entitled Impact of Halo Vest Stabilization in Patients with Blunt Cervical Spine Fractures at the 6th Academic Surgical Congress conducted on February 1-3 in Huntington Beach, CA. Kyle coauthored the paper with his mentors, Dr. L. Magnotti and Dr. M.Croce.

Natalie Hart, biology major, has been accepted to the University of Tennessee Health Science Center School of Medicine.


Justin Edwards at the ACS meeting

Justin Edwards at the national
ACS meeting with the President-elect
of the ACS, Dr. Shakhashiri.

Justin Edwards, Vice-President of the CBU Chapter of the Student Members of the American Chemcal Society (SMACS) received an important honor from the American Chemical Society. Justin was selected to receive a 2011 Student Leadership Award. He was only one of 17 students nationwide to receive this honor which included an all expense paid trip to the 2011 American Chemical Society Leadership Institute held each year at the Omni Hotel in Fort Worth, Texas. Justin is shown on the left with President-Elect of the American Chemical Society, Dr. Bassam Z. Shakhashiri, in a picture taken at the meeting.

The Science Olympiad is scheduled for Saturday Feb. 19. The Director is Dr. Andrew Diener, Assistant Professor of Mathematics. You can contact Dr. Diener by e-mail at adiener@cbu.edu and by phone at 901-321-3452.

The 57th Memphis-Shelby County Science and Engineering Fair will be held March 23-24 on the campus of Christian Brothers University (CBU). Project judging begins at 12 noon on March 24. There will be 2 judging divisions this year: one for grades 6 through 8 and one for grades 9 through 12. The Awards Ceremony will be held on April 4 in Spain Auditorium of Buckman Hall on the CBU campus. If you are interested in participating in project judging or if you know of a student who would like to enter the fair, please contact Dr. Dennis Merat at dmerat@cbu.edu.

The Forty-Second Annual Competitive Examination in High School Chemistry and the Twenty-Sixth Annual Local Examination for the Chemistry Olympiad will be held at Christian Brothers University (CBU) on Saturday, March 26, 2011. Students who earn top scores on the Local Examination for the Chemistry Olympiad will return to CBU on April 16, 2011, to take the National Exam. Top scorers on the National Exam will be invited to join the U.S. team that will compete in the 2011 International Chemistry Olympiad that will be held in Ankara, Turkey. The Competitive Examination in High School Chemistry and the Chemistry Olympiad Examination are sponsored by the Memphis Section of the American Chemical Society, the CBU Student Chapter of the American Chemical Society, and the CBU Department of Chemistry. For more information please contact Dr. Dennis Merat at dmerat@cbu.edu.

A presentation at TAS in 2010

A presentation at the 2010 TAS meeting.

The West Tennessee Collegiate Division of the Tennessee Academy of Sciences rotates its spring meeting through colleges and universities in West Tennessee. It is the turn of the University of Tennessee Health Science Center to host the event this spring. The meeting will occur on Saturday, April 9, 2011. Abstracts are due by March 25, 2011. For further information see the website.

The Fifteenth Annual CBU Student Research Poster Session will be Tuesday, April 19, 2011, in the Sabbatini Lounge of the Thomas Center. Titles of Posters are due by April 13th via e-mail to Dr. Randel Price at rprice@cbu.edu. Here are pictures from last year's session.


CBU Research Poster Session in 2010

CBU Research Poster Session in 2010.

This year's freshman Honors students taking Principles of Biology spent the fall semester (well, some of it) knee-deep in water and a little mud. Four area ponds including CBU's tiny pond located just west of Barry Hall were compared with regard to chemical content, diversity of plankton populations and numbers of bacteria/ml. A pond at the Memphis Zoo, one on the Immaculate Conception campus and a lake at the Germantown Greenway were also included in the study. Samples from each were taken regularly for two months but one outing at the Germantown Greenway (borders the Wolf River) was especially memorable. The team spent the warm afternoon sacrificing pride and even some shoes in order to collect rather odoriferous mud samples. It was initially surmised that the Greenway lake would serve as a more polluted control, but it turned out to be the model of a healthy ecosystem. In summary, good news for the fish housed in these aquatic habitats: the water quality of each appears to be excellent.


Physics demo during SPS talk

Physics demo during the SPS sponsored
show in December.

The CBU Chapter of the Society of Physics Students celebrated Christmas with a physics demonstration show on December 2nd. Demonstrations were provided by John Daffron of The University of Memphis. Mr Daffron is the scientific instrument maker for The University of Memphis Physics Department. Mr. Daffron has been designing and presenting physics demonstrations for more than 30 years. Several of Mr. Daffron's demonstrations have been featured in The Physics Teacher magazine, the monthly publication of The American Association of Physics Teachers.

Dr. Leigh C. Becker, Professor of Mathematics, is the author of the research article Resolvents and solutions of weakly singular linear Volterra integral Equations. It will appear in the March issue of the journal Nonlinear Analysis, Volume 74, Issue 5 (1 March 2011), pp. 1892-1912.

Dr. Ted Clarke, Assistant Professor of Physics, had a paper accepted for publication, with coauthors, in the journal Communications in Applied Analysis. The title of the paper is THE WENTZELL TELEGRAPH EQUATION: ASYMPTOTICS AND CONTINUOUS DEPENDENCE ON THE BOUNDARY CONDITIONS. The authors are Ted Clarke, Gisele Ruiz Goldstein, Jerome A. Goldstein, and Silvia Romanelli. This paper is the work that Dr. Clarke did in his Ph.D. thesis that includes a section on continuous dependence of the boundary conditions.

Last November, Dr. Pascal Bedrossian, Professor of Mathematics and Computer Science, and Professor Cathy Carter, Mathematics, attended the Huether Conference in Cincinnati, OH. The Huether Conference is a gathering of Lasallian educators. This year’s conference theme was STEM education. They presented a paper on MIFE: Mathematical Immersion for Freshman Engineers.


Alumni News
Melody and David

Melody Allensworth and David James at their wedding.

Melody Allensworth, Biology 2009, and David James, Civil Engineering and Electrical Engineering 2009, were married December 11, 2010. They spent their honeymoon in Brazil on Santa Catarina Island. Melody spent the summer there in 2008 with MHIRT. She is currently working on a Ph.D in Neuroscience at UAMS, Little Rock. There were a lot of current and past alumni at and in the wedding.

Christy Harwell Mostert, Natural Science 2006, doctorate in Physical Therapy from UT Memphis in 2009, and her husband, Eon Mostert, Computer Science 2004, just had a baby. Dominic Pierce Mostert was born on 11/28/10 at 1:50am weighing 7 lbs 3 oz and 19 in long. From Christy: Eon and I are esctatic that he's here in time for the holidays!

From Rebekkah Griffith Robbins, Biology 2005: I just wanted to pass along a note that some of my research from Cornell has been published (finally!!!) in Nucleic Acids Research. I'm only a secondary author, but I'm hoping it's the first in a long line to come. Here is the complete citation (with a link to the pubmed entry): Protein inactivation in mycobacteria by controlled proteolysis and its application to deplete the beta subunit of RNA polymerase by Kim JH, Wei JR, Wallach JB, Robbins RS, Rubin EJ, Schnappinger D. Nucleic Acids Res. 2010 Nov 12.

Jackie Dover Ramberg, Business Administration 2005 (but active in the School of Sciences area) and Christopher Rambert, Electical Engineering 2006 announced that: Aiden Alexander Ramberg was born November 2, 2010 at 10:23 PM. He was 8 lbs, 7. 9 oz and 21 1/4" long! He is completely healthy and doing great :) .

Christina Brown, Biology 2006, and David Tran, Chemistry 2005, are engaged.

Bobby Lawrence, Biology 2007, was accepted into Lincoln Memorial University Debusk College of Osteopathic Medicine.

Wallace Coy Lock, Biomedical Science 2010, has been accepted to the Lincoln Memorial University Debusk College of Osteopathic Medicine in Harrogate, TN.

Amy Fallon, Biology 2000, M.D. in OBGYN, and her husband, Christopher Phillips, just had a baby, Fallon Ansley Phillips, born 12/19/10, 6 lbs. 14 oz, 20 in long!

Janet Atkins, Natural Science 2006, is attending the Sacred Heart University Doctorate of Physical Therapy program in Fairfield, CT. From Janet: It is a problem based learning program and I absolutely love it, lots of group work, research, and presentations. I hope all is going well for you! I heard there is a new science building at CBU, that must be really nice.

Michael Beebe, Chemistry 2005, MD, 2010 UTCHS, and his wife, Kelly, had a baby boy: William Michael Beebe, 8 lbs 13 oz. Born on 12/11/10 at 2:24 PM at the University of Utah Hospital. Michael is currently doing an orthopaedic residency at the University of Utah.

Ashley Prevost, Biochemical Engineering 2007, has been working as a LaSallian Volunteer in California from 2007-2009. She then returned to Memphis and is currently working at St Jude Children's Research Hospital. She is engaged to Daniel Salvaggio, Psychology 2006 and M.A.T. from CBU. Daniel is currently a 3rd grade teacher at De La Salle Blessed Sacrament elementary school. Daniel proposed to Ashley on the day she received her acceptance to medical school at UTCHS, class of 2015!

Alan Fredricks, Biology 2009, is currently at Life Chiropractic school in Atlanta. In response to Dr. Fitzgerald's question, how do you like school, he said: I like it, it's rigorous but CBU standards are "too" high. Things seem easy here for now. Taking biochen, histo, embryo, osteo , A'n'P, and 4 more classes this quarter. It's definitely an advantage graduating from CBU.

Ashley Miller, Natural Science 2006, is currently in a masters program in epidemiology at the University of Tennessee Health Science Center, and she has an abstract accepted for publication: Children’s Exposure to Domestic Violence (DV) - Results from a Survey in Shelby County, Tennessee by Ashley C. Miller;a Simonne S. Nouer, MD, PhD;a Pamela D. Connor, PhD,a Nathan G. Tipton, MA; a from the Department of Preventive Medicine, University of Tennessee Health Science Center, Memphis, Tennessee. It will be presented at the The Academy on Violence and Abuse (AVA) Conference on April 14th-16th, 2011, in Minneapolis, Minnesota.

Dustin James and his wife Becky had a little girl, Smith Audrey, on 02-03-2011. Dustin is working part time with the MHIRT program and teaching in the forensic anthropology class with Ms. Hanebrink.

Jenny Wells Kiesel, Natural Science 2004, M.A.T. 2007, and her husband, Bill Kiesel, Business Administration 2003, had a baby girl, Claire Annabelle Kiesel, born on 10-25-2010. Claire is the grand niece of the previous president, Bro. Michael McGinnis.

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Featured Story: Faculty Research
2010 Student Research Session

The image above shows Dr. Katie Sauser and Caitlin Ashley
by Caitlin's research poster at the 2010 Research Poster Session.

Faculty development in the School of Sciences at CBU happens in many different ways. All faculty work on their courses, both keeping up with constantly expanding content and improving the course materials and delivery. Work on developing course web pages and web resources keeps many of our faculty active throughout the year. Work on new and improved laboratory experiments also keeps many of us busy and involved in the lab. Work on using the power of the computer to aid instruction also is a source of continued faculty effort. While many of our students do their senior research with researchers at local research institutions, some of the Sciences' faculty are able to work with students on their student research. In particular, Dr. Malinda Fitzgerald and Dr. Stan Eisen have worked with students in biology, Ms. Lynda Miller has worked with natural science students, Dr. Dennis Merat has worked with chemistry students, Professor Cathy Carter has worked with math students, and Dr. John Varriano has worked with physics and even some engineering students on their senior research projects. In Computer Science, Dr. Arthur Yanushka oversees the Computer Science internships.

Dr. John Varriano, Professor of Physics, has worked to develop some web based resources for some of his physics courses, and was recently asked by the Educational Technology division of the Ministry of Education in Singapore to allow them to link to some of his on-line resources. Dr. Anna Ross, Professor of Biology, has also created impressive resources for the web and has received numerous requests for permission to use those resources. Br. Walter Schreiner, Associate Professor of Mathematics, has developed statistics manuals for the calculators we use and for SPSS that are regularly used by other schools. He has also developed several Maple worksheets including a new set for Calculus III.

Some of us are able to find the time to devote to the traditional form of faculty development: publishing our research. Listed below are some areas of active interest and some of the papers that were published by the Sciences faculty recently.

Dr. Leigh C. Becker, Professor of Mathematics, is the author of the research article "Resolvents and solutions of weakly singular linear Volterra integral Equations." It will appear in the March issue of the journal Nonlinear Analysis, Volume 74, Issue 5 (1 March 2011), pp. 1892-1912.

Dr. Malinda Fitzgerald, Professor of Biology, is currently on sabbatical and has been traveling a lot conducting research and presenting seminars. This past summer/ fall she has been to: Rome, Italy; Sao Paulo, Rio, and Florianopolis, Brazil; San Diego, California; Albuquerque, New Mexico; Philadelphia, Pennsylvania; and Boston, Massachusetts. Two manuscripts have been published and two are under review/ revision (see her UT website for titles). In addition to traveling and presenting papers at meetings, Dr. Fitzgerald has been working in the lab of Dr. Anton Reiner at the University of Tennessee Health Science Center (UTHSC). She continues to be involved with the MHIRT program and student research through UTHSC and planning the Tennessee Academic of Sciences (TAS) meeting. Currently she is serving on the Ph.D. graduate committees at UTHSC of two CBU alumni Jennifer Paxson Saputra and Michael Herr.

Dr. Ted Clarke, Assistant Professor of Physics, had a paper accepted for publication, with coauthors, in the journal Communications in Applied Analysis. The title of the paper is THE WENTZELL TELEGRAPH EQUATION: ASYMPTOTICS AND CONTINUOUS DEPENDENCE ON THE BOUNDARY CONDITIONS. The authors are Ted Clarke, Gisele Ruiz Goldstein, Jerome A. Goldstein, and Silvia Romanelli. This paper is the work that Dr. Clarke did in his Ph.D. thesis that includes a section on continuous dependence of the boundary conditions.

Ms. Julia Hanebrink, Adjunct Lecturer and MHIRT Program Director, and Dr. Miles Richardson from Louisiana State University have had their manuscript, You, Me, and the Neandertals, accepted for publication by Qualitative Inquiry. The article is scheduled for the June 2010 publication of Qualitative Inquiry, Vol. 16:6.

Br. Edward Salgado, Professor of Biology and Chair of the Biology Department, is doing research on ferns. He made a presentation at an international conference in Singapore in August, 2010.

Dr. William Peer, Assistant Professor of Chemistry, has been awarded two patents:
* US patent 7,732,525 B2 Polymers for Paper and Paperboard Coatings to Randy Branston, William Peer, Tamal Ghosh, Howard Roger Dungworth, published June 8, 2010;
* EP 2186845 A1 (A1 means it's an application that has not been examined) Ammonium Functionalized Polymers as Antistatic Additives to Fabien Jean Brand, Balint Koroskenyi, William Joseph Peer, Published May 19, 2010.

Dr. Stan Eisen, Professor of Biology and Director of CBU's Pre-Health Programs, presented a poster at the 2010 biennial meeting of the National Association of Advisors for the Health Professions (NAAHP) held in Atlanta, June 16-20. The title: Communicating with Pre-Health Students While Conserving Electrons: The Caduceus Newsletter. The poster is on display on the Preprofessional Health Programs bulletin board on the first floor of Assisi Hall.

In November of 2010, Dr. Pascal Bedrossian, Professor of Mathematics and Computer Science, and Professor Cathy Carter, Mathematics, attended the Huether Conference in Cincinnati, OH. The Huether Conference is a gathering of Lasallian educators. This year’s conference theme was STEM education. They presented a paper on MIFE: Mathematical Immersion for Freshman Engineers.


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Featured Story: Faculty Icons
Br. Dominic Dunn, F.S.C., 1921-1987, Professor of Biology

Br. Dominic Dunn, F.S.C., 1921-1987
Professor of Biology
28 years of service at CBU.


One of the main advantages of a small university dedicated to teaching is that students get a great opportunity to interact with and know individual faculty members. That opportunity certainly exists in the School of Sciences at CBU.

In my many years at CBU I have been privileged to work with some really good teachers. Many of those have taught at CBU for a long time, and so have interacted with quite a few students. As a way of recognizing those long-serving faculty members, we have created a plaque that now stands in the lobby of the Cooper-Wilson Center for the life Sciences with the names of those faculty members who have been awarded Professor Emeritus status and/or who have served at least twenty years in the School of Sciences at CBU. We also have a link off of the Sciences' main web page that goes to a new web page that lists these individuals.

If any of our alums would like to contribute a short note of remembrance about any of these professors, please forward that note to me and I'll see about creating a web page on which to post such notes. If you are visiting the CBU campus, we welcome you to come to the Cooper-Wilson Center for the Life Sciences and see the plaque.


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Featured Alums:
Some of the recent MHIRT participants
CBU MHIRT participants

Click on picture for larger image.

MHIRT Alumni Update

Dr. Antonio Padua Carobrez came to Memphis on November 10th for a few days prior to the Society for Neuroscience meeting in San Diego California. He gave two lectures while in town, one at the University of TN Health Science Center (UTHSC) to first year medical students and one at CBU. The purpose of these lectures was to help recruit students to the MHIRT program. Also while he was in Memphis, a dinner was held at Dr. Malinda Fitzgerald’s house and several MHIRT alumni attended. It was an opportunity for the students that had been to Florianopolis , Brasil to catch up and visit with Dr. Carobrez.

Pictures from left to right are:
1. Jennifer Paxson Saputra, Biology CBU 2006, MHIRT 2005. Jennifer is currently working on her PhD at the UTHSC in Neuroscience with Dr. John Boughter.
2. Annette Diggs, Biology U of M, 2006, MHIRT 2005. For the past three years, Annette has worked at Cargill as a qualitative management chemist. She is currently applying to pharmacy school.
3. Dr. Malinda Fitzgerald, Dr. Padua Carobrez
4. Ashley Miller, Biology CBU, 2006, MHIRT 2004. After graduating from CBU, Ashley worked as a LaSallian volunteer in Providence RI. When she returned to Memphis she worked in the admissions department at CBU as an admissions counselor for three years. She is currently in the masters program in epidemiology at UTHSC, Memphis.
5. Phong Nugyen, Biology UT Martin 2009, MHIRT 2008. Phouongdinh Nguyen graduated from UTM and worked full time as a research assistant at UTHSC. She is currently in nursing school at UTHSC and working part time as a research assistant in Dr. Anton Reiner’s laboratory.
6. Vanessa Walker, Biology CBU 2011, MHIRT 2010. Vanessa is currently finishing her BS degree at CBU. She presented her research at the Society for Neuroscience meeting in November 2010.
7. Ting Wong, Biology CBU, 2010, MHIRT 2009. Ting is currently working at UTHSC full time as a research assistant in Dr. Anton Reiner’s laboratory, while she considers her graduate school options.
8. Vicky Ruleman, Biology Vanderbilt 2010, MHIRT 2010. Vicky is currently a first year medical student at UTHSC, Memphis.

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Thank You Notes to Sciences Faculty
screen shot of orbits

Above is a screen shot of the Gravity program run by the student.

This month we have a thank you note to Dr. John Varriano, Professor of Physics, from Josh Swillum, an electrical engineering major, in his PHYS 150 class this year.


This is my physics homework. It looks freaking amazing. With a change of v^2/r=a to v^(1.8)/r=A, this is what the orbit looks like. Ten cycles around the sun in under 10 years to create the suns new orbit. Physics is AWESOME!!!!!!!


This physics homework is part of the Computer-Assisted Homework for Physics (CAHP) that has been developed by Drs. John Varriano and Johnny Holmes for use in the survey physics courses at CBU.


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Featured Major: Chemistry
Students in the Organic Chemistry lab

The picture above shows students
working in the Organic Chemistry lab.

The CBU Chemistry Department offers a four-year program leading to a Bachelor of Science degree in Chemistry and a degree in Biochemistry that we featured in our September 2008 newsletter. Four paradigm options are available with the chemistry degree: a traditional paradigm designed for students interested in graduate school or working in a chemistry lab, a paradigm designed for pre-med students, a paradigm for pre-pharmacy students, and a paradigm for pre-forensic science students. The biochemistry degree is designed to provide a strong preparation for both the workplace and professional schools, including pharmacy school, medical school, or dental school. The program places emphasis on development of a wide range of laboratory skills that are needed in today’s biomedical laboratories, whether they are found in industry or academia.

The Department also offers, in conjunction with the Department of Education, a four-year program leading to a Bachelor of Science degree in Natural Science with teaching licensure in chemistry or chemistry and biology for grades 7 through 12. The Chemistry program provides students with an understanding of chemical principles in the areas of analytical, biochemistry, inorganic, organic, and physical chemistry. Students gain laboratory skills and the ability to select and utilize appropriate instrumentation to investigate and solve specified problems.

One of the main aspects of our chemistry program that contributes to its success is the number and quality of the labs that support the lectures. Labs are a place where students get to know the subject by working with the subject and working closely with the chemistry faculty. The CBU lab instructors are usually the same professors that teach the lecture component of the course. The Chemistry Department regularly offers 16 different courses and 12 of those 16 have labs attached. The labs have excellent equipment thanks to some large grants from the Assisi Foundation as well as others. The department has a web page showing and explaining their major instruments.

Chemistry is very much a three dimensional subject, and the imaging capability of computers has greatly enhanced our ability to visualize in three dimensions. The Chemistry Department has recognized the importance of this kind of tool, and with the help of donors has obtained software to help with this visualization.


Chemistry Lab Assistants

The picture above shows chemistry student workers
Justin Edwards, Kelsey Coolican, Anna Birg, and Yusef Akbik.

The Chemistry Department has adopted a philosophy that the best way to learn to do chemistry is to do it in real world settings. In addition to the research requirement in the department, we offer a variety of opportunities through either work-study or direct employment in the department for students to begin working in the laboratories throughout their entire course of study with us. Four students currently working in the department are pictured on the left in our Principles of Chemistry lab; form left to right, they are Justin Edwards, Kelsey Coolican, Anna Birg, and Yusef Akbik. Justin, Anna, and Yusef are Biochemistry majors; and Kelsey is a Chemistry major. Students begin as Laboratory Assistants; juniors and seniors have the opportunity to be selected as Laboratory Specialists. Two students who have been in our work-study program for at least two years have the opportunity to be selected each year as Associate Lab Coordinators. The Laboratory Specialist and Associate Lab Coordinator positions include supervisory responsibilities, giving students the opportunity to gain valuable leadership experience. Riley Pace (not pictured) and Justin Edwards (pictured above) have been chosen as the department’s first Laboratory Specialists.


SMACS meeting

The picture above shows SMACS president, Eric Scott
at one of the meetings

We are very fortunate to have a very active chapter of the Student Members of the American Chemical Society, SMACS, associated with the Chemistry Department. The President of SMACS, Erik Scott, is shown on the right outlining this year’s activities at a Fall meeting of the club. The club was recently notified that the CBU SMACS Chapter received a national award for their work from the American Chemical Society. Other officers in the club include Larry Anderson, Justin Gallagher, and Justin Edwards who are pictured below. Cathlyn Chan, Demario Smith, Catherine Gluszek, and Justin Burt round out this year’s slate of officers. The club is one of the sponsors of the Shelby County Science and Engineering Fair. Members of the club serve important roles in the Fair handling registration, judging middle school projects, helping with general set-up, and serving as courtesy guides. SMACS members handle registration for the Greater Shelby County High School Chemistry Olympiad and Local High School ChemistryCompetitions which are sponsored by the American Chemical Society. The club participates in a wide range of additional service activities including chemical demonstrations for grade school and high school students, participation in the Science Olympiad, participation in activities that promote environmental awareness, and presenting demos for National Chemistry Week, Science and Engineering Day, and Alumni Weekend.

SMACS

The picture above shows SMACS
members Larry Anderson, Justin Gallagher,
and Justin Edwards.

The Chemistry Department serves not only its own majors, but many others including other science and engineering majors. For the electrical, mechanical and civil engineers, the department has developed a one semester chemistry course with lab, Chem 115, that is more solid state than the traditional wet chemistry necessary for biology, chemistry, and chemical engineering students.

The results of a CBU chemistry degree, and with any of the CBU science degrees, is quite impressive. See our statistics for the past five years for acceptance into medical, pharmacy, and other health professional schools. The department is also successful in getting is graduates into graduate programs and directly into the workforce.